Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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February 5, 2006
By: Amy Sullivan

MO TOWN....I don't have much interest in this year's Super Bowl (being mostly a basketball and college football girl), but I have been curious to see how my (kind-of) hometown Detroit handles hosting duties. A few years ago, it seemed like the incentive of hosting both the MLB All-Star game and the Super Bowl within the same year would be enough to get the city (and perhaps the state) to embark on an Extreme Makeover. Sadly, Detroit has mostly dropped the ball, opting for short-term cosmetic changes without fixing some of the underlying problems that have made it America's third world city.

On the plus side, after an original musical line-up that inexplicably failed to include a single Motown star, Aretha Franklin sang the national anthem and Stevie Wonder is scheduled to join the halftime show.

For more on Detroit's missed opportunities, read this Slate piece that I wrote with a friend of mine who is an architect in Detroit.

UPDATE: Apparently Stevie Wonder sang as part of the pre-game entertainment. Meaning that the halftime show was a Motown-free performance by the showing-their-age-Rolling Stones. It boggles the mind--would a Nashville-based Super Bowl halftime show fail to showcase country musicians?

Amy Sullivan 7:33 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (75)

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Here's a football story for the fans:

http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060206/zirin

Suck it up.

Cheers,

Alan Tomlinson

Posted by: Alan Tomlinson on February 5, 2006 at 7:37 PM | PERMALINK

I thought aron nevell sang.

Are we the only society that sings our N.A. (and sometimes prays) before any team sport event on almost every level?

Posted by: Keith G on February 5, 2006 at 8:04 PM | PERMALINK

Take him to Detroit.

Posted by: Kentucky Fried Movie on February 5, 2006 at 8:14 PM | PERMALINK

They censored 'you made a dead man cum'.

Posted by: Al on February 5, 2006 at 8:17 PM | PERMALINK

Detriot is not going to have any sort of make-over unless A Katrina like catacylsm cleans out the corrupt and racist local politicans. As long as they are in power, who in their right mind out want to move to Detriot?

Posted by: Freedom Fighter on February 5, 2006 at 8:27 PM | PERMALINK

Al:

Which is a pretty good epigram for a geriatric Stones concert, come *cough* to think of it :)

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on February 5, 2006 at 8:40 PM | PERMALINK

At the very least, the Stones could have acknowledged the venue with their rendition of "Ain't Too Proud to Beg".

Pitchers and catchers report in two weeks, and that's good enough for me.

Posted by: Wally Ballou on February 5, 2006 at 8:52 PM | PERMALINK

Amy

just to musically nitpick, your post makes it sound like you think Aretha's a Motown artist-she's not. she is one of the finest of a bunch of fine singers to come out of the Motor city, but most of her classic recordings were cut in the South (Muscle Shoals, Alabama & Miami) and released on Atlantic.

I'm mqad that they knocked down the old Motown studio too-for parking! After that the only thing that would have made me happy for a half time show would be the re-formed MC5 (touring as DKT/MC5 now) and Iggy and the Stooges.

Posted by: URK on February 5, 2006 at 9:21 PM | PERMALINK

I don't know if this is apocryphal or not. I seem to recall reading it in The Economist when Detroit hosted the G7 summit (sometime during what I guess is know to wingnuts as the Blowjob Era). One of the participants was looking down from the Renaissance Center and pointing south and saying to an American official that that part over there looks pretty nice. "Ah... um... that's Canada" was the answer.

A Smug Canadian.

(and I can't name a single band out of Windsor)

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 5, 2006 at 9:25 PM | PERMALINK

The Stones sounded like shit.

Posted by: Chris on February 5, 2006 at 9:27 PM | PERMALINK


AMY SULLIVAN: Meaning that the halftime show was a Motown-free performance by the showing-their-age-Rolling Stones. It boggles the mind--would a Nashville-based Super Bowl halftime show fail to showcase country musicians?

In the interest of unboggling your mind, I should like to point out that you are wrongly equating Motown with country. The Motown sound was an offshoot of rhythm and blues and a passing phenomenon of the 60's, while country music is a bonafide genre which has endured and grown into a market force unsurpassed by any other musical category (save possibly, hip-hop).

As for the Stones "showing-their-age," or being "geriatric," as a commenter remarked, that smacks of ageism. Is there some reason men in their sixties shouldn't show their age? But had you actually watched their performance, had you seen Mick Jagger's lean body and boundless energy, had you witnessed the ecstatic reception and involved enjoyment of the fans present, you might have been a bit less ready to insult the world's last remaining super-group. Mick Jagger and the Stones in general show their age with admirable grace and impressive vigor. They should be models for anyone who aspires to reach senior citizenship, not mocked because--up close--they couldn't be mistaken for 20-something rockers.


Posted by: jayarbee on February 5, 2006 at 9:43 PM | PERMALINK

too bad the Stones didn't sing "Sweet Neo Con"

http://www.keno.org/stones_lyrics/sweet_neo_con.htm

Posted by: peg on February 5, 2006 at 9:45 PM | PERMALINK

Detroit talent, Detroit talent. What part of the Rolling Stones are the greatest rock band of all time do you not understand? Mick Jagger's performance at halftime was transcedent. Could Bob Seger done a better job? Doubtful. Bitch about civil slighting all you want but one day soon ALL the legendary figures of rock and roll will be gone and you'll be pining for the day that you saw the Rolling Stones or Paul McCartney or Ray Charles or Johnny Cash or Bo Diddley play ANY show, let alone the Super Bowl. Quit complaining about trivial matters and embrace what we still have because once it's gone it's gone for good!

Posted by: panda man on February 5, 2006 at 9:52 PM | PERMALINK



PEG: too bad the Stones didn't sing "Sweet Neo Con"

Yes, I was hoping to hear that also. I suspect that ABC made it abundantly clear, probably contracturally, that they wanted no political controversies to arise from their performance. But the right-wing hasn't forgotten or forgiven that song; so there'll be no shortage of ugly remarks about Jagger from their side of the blogosphere.


Posted by: jayarbee on February 5, 2006 at 9:56 PM | PERMALINK

I've been watching Everybody Loves Raymonf re-runs all night.....what are you people talking about?

Posted by: murmeister on February 5, 2006 at 10:04 PM | PERMALINK

Nashville would have anything the NFL said they could and they would like it. You act like Detroit has any power in the matter.

Posted by: Rob on February 5, 2006 at 10:10 PM | PERMALINK

snicker-snack: (and I can't name a single band out of Windsor)

What? You've never witnessed a Windsor Police Pipe Band performance? Philistine!

Ah, that story is too long to tell, and I'm too tired from my exciting weekend. But let me just say that you're missin' something.

(Let me also say, as I do once every year: Why do people like football?)

Posted by: shortstop on February 5, 2006 at 10:12 PM | PERMALINK

I saw the Rolling Stones in Mobile in 1970 and Stevie Wonder opened that concert. It was the greatest show I have seen. Can't compare today's bowl game, as I passed it up.

Posted by: Davei on February 5, 2006 at 10:23 PM | PERMALINK

Can everybody say "Governor Lynn Swann" ??

Posted by: GOPGregory on February 5, 2006 at 10:25 PM | PERMALINK

To celebrate the fact that the SuperBowl was in the Motor City, they should have had Ted Nugent drive a Ford monster truck on to the field during halftime and have him get out and get pistol-whipped on the 50 yard line.

By the way, the Rolling Stones sound mix was so muddy during half-time, I thought I was listening to them on the 8-track tape deck in my old 1964 Falcon. Hisses to the sound crew on that debacle...

Posted by: Stephen Kriz on February 5, 2006 at 10:25 PM | PERMALINK

Last year: Paul McCartney. This year: the Rolling Stones.

During American football's Big Game.

Call me a xenophobe if you must, but I join our host in being shocked and disgusted. Next year, let me suggest a fine American band like Styx, Bachman Turner Overdrive, or Grand Funk Railroad.

-- HuffAndBlow

Posted by: TLB on February 5, 2006 at 10:26 PM | PERMALINK

(Let me also say, as I do once every year: Why do people like football?)

The answer begins and ends with violence. Well, and maybe a little latent homosexuality. You heard it here last.

while country music is a bonafide genre which has endured and grown into a market force unsurpassed by any other musical category

Yeah, yeah, whatever...

Posted by: craigie on February 5, 2006 at 10:26 PM | PERMALINK

Republican state representative champions legislation to make South Dakota the first state to ban abortion since Roe v. Wade

Hello out there in television land. Hello..hello.. hello.. any body remember the real world? Any body figure out the correlation between circuses and the State of the Union? Hello? Hello?

Posted by: murmeister on February 5, 2006 at 10:27 PM | PERMALINK

The answer begins and ends with violence. Well, and maybe a little latent homosexuality. You heard it here last.

But I like violence and latent homosexuality! How is it that football manages to make both of them so boring!?

Posted by: shortstop on February 5, 2006 at 10:37 PM | PERMALINK

Any of the locals here experience the storm that coated everything with wet, sticky snow this morning? I lived about sixty miles NW and we had limbs down everywhere, lost a tree, and were without power the entire day.

I woke up and thought, "man, what terrible timing for Detroit's day in the sun," as it were, particularly because the weather's been so mild all week. But I guess the city didn't get hit as bad as we did.

We drove to Brighton for breakfast and met a number of sullen people in the restaurant who'd planned on hosting parties today and woke up without power.

They were bummed!

As for me, like shortstop I don't really see the attraction. I'd rather hear the Windsor Police Pipe Band -- particularly if they know "The Highland Cradle Song" and "Scots Wha Hae."

Posted by: Windhorse on February 5, 2006 at 10:38 PM | PERMALINK

I'd rather hear the Windsor Police Pipe Band...

Don't go there, Windy!

Posted by: shortstop on February 5, 2006 at 10:43 PM | PERMALINK

Amy Sullivan wrote:

...would be enough to get the city (and perhaps the state) to embark on an Extreme Makeover.

Takes money, honey...Tough choice: funding schools or renovating some of these great old buildings. Does your architect friend have kids that go to public school in the city?

On the plus side, after an original musical line-up that inexplicably failed to include a single Motown star.

Yeah, and U2 is actually from Lafyette, Louisiana...

For more on Detroit's missed opportunities, read this Slate piece that I wrote with a friend of mine who is an architect in Detroit.

Read it. Disagree with parts of it; guess you two missed the Claudel-Rodin exhibit at the DIA or missed the opening of Andiamo's or Seldom Blues...The problem seems to be twofold: Not enough money and not enough people willing to handle what little money there is properly.

It boggles the mind--would a Nashville-based Super Bowl halftime show fail to showcase country musicians?

How could a Super Bowl in New Orleans fail to include Harry Connick Jr. or Dr. John? Oh yeah: The networks probably wanted halftime to be entertaining...

Posted by: grape_crush on February 5, 2006 at 10:45 PM | PERMALINK

Isn't ABC a Disney property? Isn't the Stones tour sponsored by Disney? 'Nuff said.

Posted by: Jack Lindahl on February 5, 2006 at 10:47 PM | PERMALINK

TLB, you might not be a xenophobe, but you are a doofus. BTO was a bunch of Canadians.

Posted by: SteveK on February 5, 2006 at 10:53 PM | PERMALINK

But I like violence and latent homosexuality! How is it that football manages to make both of them so boring!?

John Madden?
Time outs?
A narrative that demands that every player be overcoming adversity, instead of just playing football?
Dunno...

Posted by: craigie on February 5, 2006 at 11:00 PM | PERMALINK

shortstop on February 5, 2006 at 10:12 PM:

What? You've never witnessed a Windsor Police Pipe Band performance?

Nah. snicker-snack strikes me as more of a fan of the Windsor Ballet...Windhorse probably knows what I'm talking about...or 'aboot'...

Windhorse on February 5, 2006 at 10:38 PM:

Any of the locals here experience the storm that coated everything with wet, sticky snow this morning?

Me and the little_grape were driving through the mess last night...which was a bummer because I wanted to take her downtown to the winter festival that's been running all week long to teach her how to ice skate. No power outages in my neigborhood, though.

Posted by: grape_crush on February 5, 2006 at 11:10 PM | PERMALINK

What? You've never witnessed a Windsor Police Pipe Band performance? Philistine!

I plead guilty - but I used to play in a pipe band when I was a teen (does this partly exonerate me?).

I'm with you on football. What kind of sport is it when you don't have blades and boards to crash into?
.
.
.
.
- ah, figure skaing

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 5, 2006 at 11:11 PM | PERMALINK

grape_crush, there was a point when it seemed any and every bar in Canada hosted its own ballet. Almost became part of the furniture. During the playoffs (you know, that game with sticks), I can even recall one scene with all the guys their backs to the ballet and eyes on the TV - priorities. The ballet stars were not amused.

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 5, 2006 at 11:21 PM | PERMALINK

Yep, snicker-snack...Hockey is to Canadians as high school football is to Texans, something akin to a religious experience, even one that trumps the -ahem- beauty of the ballet...

Posted by: grape_crush on February 5, 2006 at 11:42 PM | PERMALINK

George Will's definiton of football is the only remotely witty thing he ever said:
"Football represents the worst aspects of American life: violence punctuated by committee meetings."

And every time I try to watch the Super Bowl, I find myself trying to access Paul Verhoeven's commentary track.

Posted by: Steve Paradis on February 5, 2006 at 11:44 PM | PERMALINK

I admit to enjoying a good violent hockey game. No doubt my secret (well, sort of secret) joy at a little lyrically executed high sticking reflects some visceral baseness that I'm supposed to be trying to civilize out of myself. But we are not renowned for our subtlety in Chicago. And winter makes us mean.

I like ballet, too. A lot. Ah, the complexities of human experience.

Posted by: shortstop on February 5, 2006 at 11:49 PM | PERMALINK

So, of course, if Grand Funk Railroad. Canadian, that is. But Dennis DeYoung -- the lead singer of Styx -- is American. Perhaps he was grouping the three together because they all share the common trait of sucking.

Posted by: Pat on February 5, 2006 at 11:51 PM | PERMALINK

It boggles the mind--would a Nashville-based Super Bowl halftime show fail to showcase country musicians?...

If there's a God in heaven it would.

But a point well-taken anyway. It almost seems like the Stones unearthed Little Red Rooster just to pay some respect.

Posted by: secularhuman on February 5, 2006 at 11:52 PM | PERMALINK

By the way, while it's a nice thought to clean up Detroit, there's a little thing missing that most people tend to think is required for such an endeavor. It's called a "tax base." And Detroit doesn't have one. It is literally too broken to fix. Which is a shame, because it was at one time a living city.

But who is going to pay for a reformation of Detroit? Not the people in suburbs like Northville or Grosse Point or Plymouth, where Amy is from. Most young people in those towns have been to Detroit -- if at all -- one or two times in their entire life. And folks, it's about 25 miles away. You think I'm kidding? I'm not.

Posted by: Pat on February 5, 2006 at 11:59 PM | PERMALINK

Awk! You guys got me good. Suddenly I suspected that these words "Windsor ballet" might not mean what I think they mean. And so, I discover, they do not! Naive much?!

Posted by: shortstop on February 6, 2006 at 12:03 AM | PERMALINK

Awk! You guys got me good.

An admission. I had to google the words "Windsor Ballet" too.

A second admission: I like the other kind too.

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 6, 2006 at 12:10 AM | PERMALINK

the Windsor Ballet...Windhorse probably knows what I'm talking about

Ah, nights spent at the ballet! ;)

A younger and unmarried Windhorse had occasion to attend performances there once or twice. I liked to go early and watch the dancers work the barre to limber up. I can't recall what ballets I attended but I seem to remember one about a forest with magical silver poles, a scene replete with balancoire, ciseaux, and of course, plis.

Posted by: Windhorse on February 6, 2006 at 12:18 AM | PERMALINK

I'd be more partial to watching a Spandau Ballet.

Posted by: osama_been_forgotten on February 6, 2006 at 12:58 AM | PERMALINK

Pat on February 5, 2006 at 11:59 PM:

You think I'm kidding? I'm not.

You are exaggerating, but not by much.

shortstop on February 6, 2006 at 12:03 AM:

Suddenly I suspected that these words "Windsor ballet" might not mean what I think they mean.

You're not naive; you just got caught by a local euphemism...Hope no one was at work when they Googled that phrase...

Posted by: grape_crush on February 6, 2006 at 1:48 AM | PERMALINK

Oh, and how 'bout those wonderful fans who loudly booed every single Dallas Super Bowl MVP - most particularly Roger Staubach. What a show of 'good sportmanship' that was.

So the Steelers finally make it back to The Big Game and there's, ya know, Franco and all but...where's Terry?

No one even mentions Terry Bradshaw? QB who led them to 4 wins.

Much less do you even see a shot of him watching the game. Nada. It's like he doesn't exist.

'Cause he works for ESPN? ABC owns fracking ESPN. What's up wid dat?

I don't get it.

Posted by: CFShep on February 6, 2006 at 8:08 AM | PERMALINK

That whole big MVP thing and I'm sitting there as Super Bowls XIII and XIV are MIA.

XIII Steelers 35 - Cowboys 31 Bradshaw throw 4 TD passes.

XIV Steelers 31 - LA Rams 10 Bradshaw passes for over 300 yards

Terry Bradshaw was the MVP in both games.

I noticed this immediately. This huge gap. My dear but occasionally idiot friend Steve in Mississippi tries to tell me Terry never won MVP and I know that's wrong (I saw Terry play back when he was at LATech) so I looked it up.

Now he owes me not only the $5 we'd wagered on the outcome of this game but a big whopping apology, too.

Posted by: CFShep on February 6, 2006 at 8:21 AM | PERMALINK

No one even mentions Terry Bradshaw? QB who led them to 4 wins.

Much less do you even see a shot of him watching the game. Nada. It's like he doesn't exist.

'Cause he works for ESPN? ABC owns fracking ESPN. What's up wid dat?

Terry Bradshaw is a commentator for Fox Sports, not ESPN. However Troy Aikman works for Fox Sports as well and he was included in the program.

Posted by: "Fair and Balanced" Dave on February 6, 2006 at 8:38 AM | PERMALINK

Thanks, Dave. You're right, of course, he works for Fox - but I try think about Fox as little as possible. My own personal 'black hole' on this is "The Shield".

So WTF? How and why did XIII and XVI vanish?

Posted by: CFShep on February 6, 2006 at 8:44 AM | PERMALINK

Amy, long ago I loved visiting the DIA - Detroit Institute of Arts. Given the white flight and what seemed the reluctance of City Council to fund the DIA fully later on, is there a political movement to relocate the DIA in a more affluent area?

Just wondering. From a distance, it seems like it could be greeted as a good idea benefiting both communities -- or it could be derided as blatant racism/elitism.

For those of you not from Detroit, odd facts: I grew up in Windsor, Ontario, but I lived closer to downtown Detroit than most Detroiters, even back then, when Detroit's suburbs had not exploded with white flight. Also, you know the US is south of Canada, but do you know Detroit is north of Windsor? So Windsor is sometimes referred to "South Detroit" (coined after my time, but I laughed when I heard it).

Now I live west of Toronto, or as I can say to Americans, "north of Buffalo".

Posted by: Bob M on February 6, 2006 at 9:26 AM | PERMALINK

That's a typo - Rams 19 not 10.

Sorry.

Posted by: CFShep on February 6, 2006 at 9:34 AM | PERMALINK

shortstop,

As you say, you like violence, and in general Americans love violence and winning, hence their initial support for invading Iraq and their growing unease now.

Football should be the perfect American sport - hyper violence, enhanced masculinity, and a guuranteed winner every time. As a nod to our "southern" brethren the uniform even covers up almost any aspect of race.

But I think they may have pushed the envelope a little too far. Football is starting to seem a little unreal. We are starting to lose the sense that there are actually real people bashing each other. Without the human element the violence doesn't thrill nearly as much.

Fear not, though. The Ultimate Fight club steps up to the plate. You've got raw man on man violence, and when the action moves to the floor you've got obvious homosexual images to boot.

I think that perhaps, in the quest for bigger and bettre

Posted by: Tripp on February 6, 2006 at 10:03 AM | PERMALINK

Do not fear Nashville showcasing their country artists in a Super Bowl. Unless Nashville puts a roof over its stadium, you'll never see a Super Bowl here; it gets a touch too cold in the winter.

But yeah, the Super Bowl entertainment is pretty much what the NFL and the networks dictate. If they want the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards to play bagpipes, you'll hear bagpipes. If they want Janet Jackson to show some tit...

Posted by: dr sardonicus on February 6, 2006 at 10:06 AM | PERMALINK


    A Smug Canadian.
    (and I can't name a single band out of Windsor)

Well the late Skip Spence was from Windsor. He was a founding member of Jefferson Airplane and Moby Grape.

Posted by: G.Kerby on February 6, 2006 at 10:16 AM | PERMALINK

Absolutely a Nashville-based Superbowl would fail to showcase country musicians. If musicians in that genre had revealed their boobs on national television the year before, that is.

Posted by: Bah Humbug on February 6, 2006 at 11:07 AM | PERMALINK

"....had you witnessed the ecstatic reception and involved enjoyment of the fans present."

You mean the paid extras in the infield, the ones waving their hands over their heads just as they were instructed to do? I like the Stones as much as anybody but, please, this is the Superbowl halftime show, the very definition of tasteless kitsch.

Posted by: wally on February 6, 2006 at 11:31 AM | PERMALINK

[i]It (Detroit) is literally too broken to fix.[/i]

It's fixable, but the first step that Detroit needs to take is to get rid of their crook of a mayor, Kwame Kilpatrick. Until that step is taken, every dollar that goes into Detroit will be nothing more than wasted money.

Posted by: tam1MI on February 6, 2006 at 11:39 AM | PERMALINK

Ever wonder how the NFL poo-bahs can pick Super Bowl sites years in advance and consistently manage not to have a team play in its home stadium?

Posted by: C.J.Colucci on February 6, 2006 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

Keith Richard is testament to the War on some drugs.

Posted by: sister morphine on February 6, 2006 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

Well, I can certainly understand why anyone from Chicago would prefer ballet.

If it had not been for George Halas, Chicago would have never been able to appreciate the many fine ballets of the world.

As an Impressario, George, referred to as Papa Ballet, brought some of the finest male dancers in the world to Chicago. Perhaps the Company has never achieved the fame it so richly deserves, because the Company was rather weak on the feminine side. Can anyone actually recall a female dancer, let alone a prima ballerina, from that group?

But, George brought Bronko Nagurski, Red Grange, Doug Atkins, George Blanda, the scintilating Dick Butkus, Dan Hampton, Sid Luckman, Walter Payton, Mike Singletary, and my personal favorite, Gale Sayers.

Ah, Butkus in the Nutcracker, Sayers doing Balanchine, Nagurski's stunning rendition of Bejart's Bolero.

Wonder why they cut Mark Morris? He could have been, at least, a coach.

Posted by: stupid git on February 6, 2006 at 12:16 PM | PERMALINK

I asked this same little Q over in letters to King Kaufman at Salon and got a relply saying that 'Steelers great Terry Bradshaw had chosen to spend time with his family."

Terry can read. Yes, really.

I read maybe a couple of dozen articles and columns before the game. Every single one gave lip service to Chuck Noll or mentioned Franco Harris and the four previous championships. Not one said one word about Terry. Not one.

I think maybe he 'chose' not to be there if no one was willing to acknowledge his contribution. Not once. Like just maybe he got the impression that no one gave a shit.

Ditto the articles and columns about XL. Lots of ink re 'one for the thumb' - that is that this makes 5. Terry's not mentioned at all. Not once.

The guy with 4 SB rings.

Sucks like an Electrolux.

Posted by: CFShep on February 6, 2006 at 12:29 PM | PERMALINK

C.J.,

I don't think there is a conspiracy. The first ten or so Super Bowls were not played at any NFL team's field.

After that there was a big preference for southern locations because of the weather, and it was generally understood that warm weather teams don't do as well.

Finally we see some super bowls at nothern domed stadiums, but again dome teams aren't known for being excellent.

So I think it is the case where the fields that produce a champion football team are not the fields where they want to hold the Super Bowl in the middle of winter.

Posted by: Tripp on February 6, 2006 at 12:30 PM | PERMALINK

stupid git,

I once shared an airplane ride with Gale Sayers. True story. Of course he was in first class and I was in coach.

Posted by: Tripp on February 6, 2006 at 12:31 PM | PERMALINK

As you say, you like violence, and in general Americans love violence and winning, hence their initial support for invading Iraq and their growing unease now.

Don't take that joke seriously, Tripp; I think my posting history here pretty much demonstrates I don't love violence, with the exceptions of a good hockey game and a well-executed smackdown of GOP bullshit.

But your point is well taken. Were we actually winning in Iraq, many of our countrymen would be orgasmically excited about our being there. Sick freaks.

Posted by: shortstop on February 6, 2006 at 1:03 PM | PERMALINK

"Keith Richard is testament to the War on some drugs."

And they said this war couldn't be won!

Posted by: Kenji on February 6, 2006 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

Wow, Amy "Lieberman" Sullivan briefly morphs into a liberal, but only on something too abusrd and preposterous to matter.

Posted by: jim on February 6, 2006 at 4:40 PM | PERMALINK

Amy
you remain an uninformed spreader of crap

Posted by: Katherine Graham Cracker on February 6, 2006 at 5:06 PM | PERMALINK

But who is going to pay for a reformation of Detroit? Not the people in suburbs like Northville or Grosse Point or Plymouth, where Amy is from. Most young people in those towns have been to Detroit -- if at all -- one or two times in their entire life. And folks, it's about 25 miles away. You think I'm kidding? I'm not.

Oh I know you're kidding... because I used to live in Windsor and saw every 19 and 20-year old from SE Michigan come over the border every weekend. Legal gambling and prostitution are one thing to lure young bodies, but a 19-year-old drinking age is like a frickin' magnet.

Posted by: Pyrrho on February 6, 2006 at 5:42 PM | PERMALINK

Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick's not that bad, from what I've seen, and I've lived in Detroit for 26 years. He got a lot of terrible press, but most of it was for relatively minor stuff like partying in the mayor's mansion, and for common stuff like hiring cronies and spending too much city money on fancy cars.

He was reelected this year, in surprising come from behind fashion. I didn't vote for him, and suspect that dirty tricks played a significant role in the outcome. On the other hand, he comes across well to me in his public statements. He's not combative like former mayor Coleman Young, and has admitted mistakes.

He has followed through on some of the successes of former Mayor Archer, who capitalized big time on the booming economy of the '90s. Kilpatrick seems to work well with the white metro-Detroit power structure, and the unified effort they put forth to host the superbowl was amazing.

I've worked in downtown Detroit for 26 years, and I've never seen downtown so beautiful and vibrant. A lot of the changes were cosmetic and a lot of energy was temporary, but still, I was impressed as was just about everyone who was down here this past weekend...

Posted by: Detroit Dan on February 6, 2006 at 5:52 PM | PERMALINK

Terry wasn't snubbed, he refused to attend -like Joe Montana- the NFL didn't pay his appearance fee. I dunno what Terry's is, but Montana demanded 100K.

Oh, and my Seahawks wuzzed robbed!

Posted by: Frinklin on February 6, 2006 at 7:33 PM | PERMALINK

I agree that the Seahawks got the wrong end of the whistle...

Posted by: Detroit Dan on February 6, 2006 at 8:42 PM | PERMALINK

The Stones were terrific, as was McCartney the year before. These guys are performing because (1) they're rock icons; and, (2) so many home grown artists are just plain bad and therefore desperately resort to stupid tricks to jazz their shows up, e.g., Janet Jackson. And how about those Stones? Are they testaments to clean living or what?

Why in the world the NFL decided to hold the Super Bowl in Detroit is beyond me. I know Detroit. And Detroit is no New Orleans (pre-Katrina). Or Miami. Each of these cities is seriously flawed, but they did (do) have their charms for visitors. Detroit is.....Detroit. Detroit basically sucks. It is one of those formerly important big cities whose liveblood has been sucked out of it by stupid capitalists, race hustlers, criminal public officials and just plain criminals.

Time for the NFL to start putting their championship game in the city of one of the two teams. Rotate it each year: NFC, AFC. The Super Bowl now is a joke. Exactly what did any of those high rollers in Detroit do to deserve the windfall they've gotten? And what did the Detroit taxpayersfew of them as there may bedo to deserve paying for all of these high rollers?

Posted by: Nixon Did It on February 6, 2006 at 10:34 PM | PERMALINK

Detroit basically sucks

Well, there's always one argument in Detroit's favor. That there is a St. Louis.

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 6, 2006 at 10:46 PM | PERMALINK

I grew up in Detroit (first, then later in the burbs) and I worked as a teenager in a shortening factory down at the Eastern Market. One of the most shattering images of latter-day Detroit was a photograph published in the NY Times Sunday Magazine about ten years ago, a picture of cows grazing on "pasture" land, land that was actually a block not far from the Eastern Market on which every dwelling had been burned over the years so completely that the land had gone back to meadow. And for those not from the Motor City, this is perhaps 20 blocks from downtown.

I have also lived in Richmond Virginia for quite a few years, and the two cities share the same problem. The inner part of each city has been substantially destroyed, and will not rebuilt, because the white power structure in both cases has given entirely up on the city. Both Richmond and Detroit have booming and stylish "edge cities" that make trips downtown unnecessary and pointless. And in both cities, I have heard suburbanites one-upping each other at cocktail parties to see who had failed to set foot in each respective city the longest.

When it's a joke, it's O-V-E-R.

Posted by: jprichva on February 6, 2006 at 11:20 PM | PERMALINK

Both Richmond and Detroit have booming and stylish "edge cities"

Which is the nub of the problem. Suburbs and downtown need to be combined into one entitiy, one tax base. Living in the suburbs that take advantage of the amenities of the city is a case of having your cake and eating it too.

But very American, this idea of the relatively well-to-do opting out of the paying but never out of the getting.

Posted by: snicker-snack on February 6, 2006 at 11:29 PM | PERMALINK

Overlooked in the Motown discussion, was that Stevie Wonder highlighted the 99 Superbowl halftime, and as I recall, performed superably.

Posted by: Steve Crickmore on February 7, 2006 at 8:55 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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