Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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February 22, 2006
By: Kevin Drum

DEAD AIR....If you're wondering where I've been all day, I was up in Culver City trying out to be a contestant on Jeopardy. I think about a quarter of the applicants were attorneys. What's up with that?

As for me, I did OK except for the fact that I have a voice made for blogging. All that's left now is to wait and see if they call me to be on the show sometime over the next year. Tick tick tick.....

Kevin Drum 1:14 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (71)

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Comments

Oh man, that'd be awesome. Totally trippy.

Posted by: Patrick on February 22, 2006 at 1:18 AM | PERMALINK

Interesting. I think the folks on Jeopardy are aliens - they know way too much arcane shit.

Unless, of course, you got "Bush Fuckups" for $200. Then you're in.

Posted by: craigie on February 22, 2006 at 1:18 AM | PERMALINK

Tick tick tick.....

or rather: "Final Jeopardy" theme....

Posted by: exasperanto on February 22, 2006 at 1:22 AM | PERMALINK

Hey, I've got this secret transmitter you can wear on your back so I can feed you the answers.

Of course, it might make a lump in your shirt, so wear a loose jacket.

I get fifty percent.

Posted by: tbrosz on February 22, 2006 at 1:25 AM | PERMALINK

http://www.qwantz.com/index.pl?comic=722

Posted by: cld on February 22, 2006 at 1:25 AM | PERMALINK

"I've got to ask you about the Penis Mightier."

Posted by: Monstertron on February 22, 2006 at 1:27 AM | PERMALINK

Who was Harry Whittington??

Posted by: exasperanto on February 22, 2006 at 1:28 AM | PERMALINK

My wife passed the tryouts once and was told she would definitely get the call to be on the show. Then 9-11 completely screwed with their schedule and she never got the call. Too bad, she's super smart.

Posted by: The Screed on February 22, 2006 at 1:34 AM | PERMALINK

"This man jumped between Dick Cheney and a WMD-wielding quail without announcing his presence."

Posted by: JIm Bartle on February 22, 2006 at 1:36 AM | PERMALINK

Tbrosz: OK, I'll take you up on that. But who's going to be on the other end of the transmitter? Ken Jennings?

Posted by: Kevin Drum on February 22, 2006 at 1:37 AM | PERMALINK

That's so cool! I was on four years ago...ping me and I'll give you some tips.


A.L.

Posted by: Armed Liberal on February 22, 2006 at 1:41 AM | PERMALINK

Congrat on passing. I tried out 3 times & failed all 3 times. Second time went with friends, and we knew 10 questions into the test that we were toast - went to Barney's Beanery to lick our wounds.

We'll all watch & cheer you if you do make it on.

Posted by: tarylcabot on February 22, 2006 at 1:42 AM | PERMALINK

I hope you didn't spend any time studying-up or cramming for it. I've read that people do that, which seems pretty pathetic to me.

Posted by: tom f on February 22, 2006 at 1:45 AM | PERMALINK

Good Luck Kevin. I was on Family Feud many many years ago. As long as you dont care about the money you dont win, it a blast.

PS Attorneys dont have anything to do these days. There is a gap this month between the house closings and the foreclosures.

Posted by: troglodyte on February 22, 2006 at 1:47 AM | PERMALINK

A.L.: Oh sure, they'd love you, with your foghorn voice, wouldn't they? I'll bet they didn't bug you to talk louder, did they?

Tom: Nah. I really don't know just what you'd study for Jeopardy anyway.

Posted by: Kevin Drum on February 22, 2006 at 1:47 AM | PERMALINK

As an attorney and former Jeopardy contestant (came in second, loved my trip to Hawaii, humiliated to this day that I missed a question about my own home town), I can clear up your mystery for you. Attorneys are often bored liberal arts majors who never figured out what to do with their lives. Such people are often drawn to dilettantism, absorbing a little bit about every subject. They (we?) are generalists, as opposed to, say, doctors, who are wicked smart but usually do badly on Jeopardy. Which leads me to my next point - people often assume, after learning that I was on the show, that I'm "smart." I always remind them - and more importantly, myself - that there is a big difference between having a head stuffed with trivia and being intelligent.

Posted by: rod on February 22, 2006 at 1:59 AM | PERMALINK

The Sony studios are about a half dozen blocks from where I live. Was that you honking outside?

I've had a couple friends make it onto the show. The last one is an absolutely brilliant PhD and pretty much knew all of the answers (you could see her clicking away on the buzzer) but had problems buzzing in. If you press the button too soon, it locks you out for a few moments. It took a little bit before she got used to it (which cost her).

Then during a commercial break, they made her change her posture and the way she was holding the buzzer (she sort'uv folder her arms so as to support the buzzing hand) to look better on TV and that threw her off a bit more. She did reasonably well but didn't win.

Her main recommendation was to practice the timing of buzzing in (I think they had a light go on when you could buzz in, but I forget. Whatever the queue, I couldn't see it from the audience). Also, practice with distractions (preferably with people around you so you can get past some of the initial nervousness of going in front of an audience).

Best of luck! If you make it on, let us know. I might be able to sneak down to watch the taping and cheer you on (at least until I get thrown out of the audience for unruly behavior... again). =)

Posted by: Augustus on February 22, 2006 at 3:37 AM | PERMALINK

If you need any coaching on the music biz, or music in general, I might be able to help.

Or baseball, or science, or most anything.

Good luck!

Posted by: SteveAudio on February 22, 2006 at 3:38 AM | PERMALINK

Good luck - don't forget to bone up on your foods that start with the letter 'Q.'

Posted by: Death Rabbit on February 22, 2006 at 4:04 AM | PERMALINK

If that doesn't explain everything... :)

Posted by: Jimm on February 22, 2006 at 4:33 AM | PERMALINK

I hate the very thought of them casting something like Jeopardy.
What happened to seeing all kinds of human weirdness come creeping out of the woodwork to compete in completely unfathomable questions. I want quizshows that make me feel like Homer, not the old tired "WTF! I could have won this round?!"

Carl Barks nailed the whole thing so beautifully in the one about Donald and the talking dog.

One feels compelled to say to Kevin:
"Times are tough, huh, bud?"

Posted by: OmniDane on February 22, 2006 at 6:07 AM | PERMALINK

I hate the very thought of them casting something like Jeopardy.
What happened to seeing all kinds of human weirdness come creeping out of the woodwork to compete in completely unfathomable questions. I want quizshows that make me feel like Homer, not the old tired "WTF! I could have won this round?!"

Carl Barks nailed the whole thing so beautifully in the one about Donald and the talking dog.

One feels compelled to say to Kevin:
"Times are tough, huh, bud?"

Posted by: OmniDane on February 22, 2006 at 6:11 AM | PERMALINK

Oh, in stereo! Connection error, my ...well, behind!

Posted by: OmniDane on February 22, 2006 at 6:17 AM | PERMALINK

Good luck,my daughter was on college jeopardy,it's great fun. If you do get on,practice you button-pushing reflexes. It's the most important thing. It doesn't matter how much you know,it's how quick you are. Everybody who makes it is fairly bright. You have to be quick.

Posted by: TJM on February 22, 2006 at 7:56 AM | PERMALINK

My college English professor George Soule, a Shakespeare specialist, made it onto the show in the early 90's. He won his regular season five in a row and made it to the Tournament of Champions. He was doing well in the tournament when he got a gift from heaven in the second round: a "Shakespeare" category in double jeopardy. He was merrily running the category down when - mirabile dictu - he gets a daily double. He is close to the lead, and he really knows Shakespeare, so he decides to go for it, and makes a big bet, for most of his money. If he gets it, he's pretty much guaranteed to advance. The answer is "This play begins and ends with the same seven letter word."

George, shocked by the difficulty of the question, begins to scan his memory for the opening and closing speeches of the great plays. He is coming up with nothing, and when time is up he answers, lamely "What is...Hamlet?" Alex looks pained and say "No, I'm sorry, the answer is 'Measure for Measure."

That was it; he didn't recover and was eliminated. He made a bunch of money on the show, but he still winces when he thinks of that day (or, at least it did when I knew him, as he told the story over beers with a wry twinge).

Posted by: st on February 22, 2006 at 8:09 AM | PERMALINK

One big advantage for you Kevin is that they like to have locals come in "in case.."

*someone they have picked gets ill (happens ALL the time)

*someone up there freezes like a deer in the headlights and can't even talk to Alex

*someone's head explodes in frustration (all the notes about the button-pushing-timing are right f'ing on).

If they call you once to be an alternate and you don't get on, they promise you will get on the next time they call. That happened to me when I lived in Ventura in 1984.

I came in second after everyone missed the final J answer:

"This candidate, among all of those who ran against FDR, garnered the most electoral votes.:

In my mind's eye I looked at that f'ing headline on the paper in Truman's hands and COULD NOT see the name. I have it on good authority (my mom) that my dad was screaming "Dewey! Dewey!" at the TV in the hopes that I would retroactively receive that information by ESP.

It was a blast! It was disappointing! But Alex Trebek is the class act he seems to be: gracious, kind, charming, and impeccably dressed.

Posted by: dsc on February 22, 2006 at 8:51 AM | PERMALINK

"I'll take 'Game Show Contestants' for $800, Alex."

"This type of person typically auditions for trivia-based games shows, like this one."

"What is 'a know-it-all?'"

"I'm sorry, 'elitist snob' is what we were looking for. That brings you down to -$8,400. Good luck in Double Jeopardy!

Posted by: jf on February 22, 2006 at 8:55 AM | PERMALINK

Can I retract that? I never get more than two or three questions in a category. Though I bet I could do well with the button pushing.

Posted by: jf on February 22, 2006 at 9:04 AM | PERMALINK

Al Gore would make a good Jeopardy contestant, too.

Posted by: Monkey See on February 22, 2006 at 9:14 AM | PERMALINK

I was on Jeopardy in 1995. Won on the Friday (which was the last of five shows taped that day) went back to my hotel and tried to sleep and showed up the next morning where I got plowed (couldn't do the buzzer, blew Daniel Moynahan on Double Jeopardy, could only think of this equivalent in the House but couldn't get my brain to the Senate believe it or not) and lost because I mispelled the currency of Poland in Final Jeopardy (zloty has no "n" in it.)

Incidently, I auditioned twice. I too have the voice for blogging and was poor in the second audition. But they remembered me from the first time so they put me through. Then they waited a year and a half before finally calling me.

Was a great experience. But I did lose to a lawyer (who lost to a lawyer who went on to win five).

Posted by: gord brown on February 22, 2006 at 9:29 AM | PERMALINK

Attorneys make excellent contestants in the early going, but they have a lot of trouble with Double Jeopardy.

Posted by: Dennis Doubleday on February 22, 2006 at 9:30 AM | PERMALINK

Kevin, I've seen you on TV, (C-span, I think it was) and I think you'd make a fine contestant! Hope you make the cut and win big. You deserve it.

Posted by: natavist on February 22, 2006 at 9:45 AM | PERMALINK

Regarding the voice made for blogging - there are classes available for that. Seriously.

I'm always a little surprised that people will spend thousands and thousands on a college degree, 90% of which they will never use or which will become obsolete in 5 years, and they will not spend one dime on easily fixable things like their voice, which will be with them their entire life and will impact nearly everything they do.

This is a trememdous blind spot in our alleged meritocracy.

Posted by: Tripp on February 22, 2006 at 9:47 AM | PERMALINK

I've heard from two people who wre on it that Jeopardy is all in the trigger finger--buzz in right away if you think there's any chance at all you know the answer!!

Lots of people who are really smart lose to creepy, less-smart just because they're not aggressive enough... oh my God -- Jeopardy is just like politics!!

Posted by: sullijan on February 22, 2006 at 9:51 AM | PERMALINK

Tbrosz: OK, I'll take you up on that. But who's going to be on the other end of the transmitter? Ken Jennings?
Posted by: Kevin Drum

I quit watching during the KJ business. The 'contestants' they started putting up against him after the first week or so would have been challenged to tie their own shoelaces.

Can you say: 'Rigged to boost ratings?"

Terbeck's fawning was such that I wondered if he was auditioning for his own show on FauxNews. Or was the KJ himself?

All it took was a REAL Jeopardy Champ to show up and blow little Kennie up outta the water.

Wish Chuck 'the Destroyer' had found time to be there. Bye, bye little impostor.

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 10:15 AM | PERMALINK

The Mandarin has passed the test and made it into the contestant pool every year for the past five years and lives about 30 minuts from the studio. Phone hasn't rung. Good luck, big guy.

Posted by: TheMandarin on February 22, 2006 at 10:22 AM | PERMALINK

You know, watching Ken Jennings I became convinced that he had somehow figured out how to beat the buzz-in system.

I'm not trashing how much he knows, he did really well. He answered lots of hard questions that I couldn't, so more power to him. But I also noticed that he was always the first to ring in on easy questions, too.

The button that you ring in with is a clicker, right? You push it down, then release it, and you don't ring in until it clicks back up, right?

Well, what if you push it down way early, while Alex reads the clue, and then release it when the light comes on? Maybe then the penalty lockout is expired by the time you're allowed to ring in? Or maybe the penalty doesn't apply until you release the clicker. If that works, and doesn't lock you out, wouldn't it make you faster than everyone who is trying to go down, then up?

Posted by: Doctor Jay on February 22, 2006 at 10:26 AM | PERMALINK

Doctor Jay,

Good theory. Electronically it could work either way. Switches have debounce circuitry so they don't give multiple false positives due to the mechanical bounce when the metal pieces make contact.

The actual button 'detection' could be programmed to take effect when the button is pressed or when it is released. They could even take note of both events, so I guess I'm saying unless someone explains how the Jeapordy buttons are 'programmed' we really don't know exactly how it works on the show.

Way back on the olden days I was on a local high school quiz show. The problem there was that the question cards were too far away to read and our contestant stand was the farthest from the host and it was hard to hear him read the question.

Posted by: Tripp on February 22, 2006 at 10:40 AM | PERMALINK

Doctor Jay,

I was on Jeopardy in 2000. The buzzer doesn't work that way. If you touch the button early, you are locked out until three seconds after the lights (which signal that Alex is done with the clue) flash.

BTW, I think just about everyone who gets on the show knows the answer to almost all of the questions, aside from brain farts like Gord's (mine was saying "Poconos" when I meant "Appalachians"). What separates the winners from the losers is buzzer timing. If I were you, Kevin, I would sit around watching Jeopardy with a pen in you hand, practicing ringing in.

Posted by: Samba00 on February 22, 2006 at 10:43 AM | PERMALINK

The wife was on in '91 while she was still nursing our daughter. She had qualified a year before here in Austin. She got the call just before Thanksgiving and we had to make incredible arrangements to get the kiddo taken care of. Not much we could do with Mom who was terrified about leakage, but took an industrial sized breast pump anyway. She was not comfortable but survived.

They taped 5 the first day and she ended up in the 6th group. So she was first the next day. A cold kicked in that night and her other newbie was a professional grad student who had been on 2 college bowl championships. She was toast, but got 2nd, a nice ski vacation to Killington.

And the buzzer is really key. I still remember her looking at the buzzer in her hand with a puzzled look.

Posted by: Nat on February 22, 2006 at 10:56 AM | PERMALINK

Assuming the buzzer is key a tiny tip is to press the button with the inside first knuckle of your index finger, not the finger tip.

The flesh is thinner there and it can shave a tiny amount off your response time.

I was taught this when manually timing high school track events, so it comes anectdotally, but it might be true, and it doesn't hurt.

Posted by: Tripp on February 22, 2006 at 11:13 AM | PERMALINK

Congratulations and good luck. Keep your perspective though, amongst the smarties I know who have won,lost and been shoved aside by jeopardy, its a soul challenging series of moments. Stay tuff and remember who you are regardless...

Posted by: Shrink in SF on February 22, 2006 at 11:33 AM | PERMALINK

Kevin - I know what you mean about "a voice made for blogging." That's why I never bothered calling in to radio talk shows.

Posted by: RT on February 22, 2006 at 11:45 AM | PERMALINK

Jeez, there's a huge bunch of people here who seem personally to know Jeopardy constestants.

This must mean something important about blogs. God knows what.

Time for a panel.

Posted by: frankly0 on February 22, 2006 at 11:49 AM | PERMALINK

Kevin, If you get on, and get stumped by a "Jeopardy" answer, pull out the all-purpose correct question: "What is 9/11 CHANGED EVERYTHING?"

Posted by: ferd on February 22, 2006 at 12:12 PM | PERMALINK

I've always wondered how Alex reads the questions so fast. Is there a crew member assigned to punch in the answer/question, once the contests calls the catagory? Does Alex use a computer monitor to read it? Sometimes he reads from a card, what is that? Sometimes the contestant uses an abbreviation to call the catagory and goes very fast? Anybody know how this stuff works?

Posted by: the fake Fake Al on February 22, 2006 at 12:15 PM | PERMALINK

I feel really cool and special and iconoclastic and shit because I seem to be the only person here who hasn't been on Jeopardy, tried out for it or knows someone who's done either.

Posted by: shortstop on February 22, 2006 at 12:17 PM | PERMALINK

Er, reviewing my writing in the last post, I can see why my personal acquaintance with Jeopardy is nil.

Posted by: shortstop on February 22, 2006 at 12:18 PM | PERMALINK

I know it's all now lumped into 'trivia' but it used to be called "Stuff you'd damned well better know cold if you have any hope whatsoever of passing the Foreign Service Exam'.

I understand, though, that the FSE has been dumbed down three times since I passed it back in the 70's.

This explains so much, really.

'Trivia' is rightly being able to name both actors who played Darrin on "Bewitched" or the names of The Limelighters. (extra points awarded)

That history, arts, sciences, geography or literature should be consigned to this category and demeaned as 'useless information' is, frankly, depressing as all get out.

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 12:18 PM | PERMALINK

Dick Sargent and Dick York.

Posted by: shortstop on February 22, 2006 at 12:21 PM | PERMALINK

I couldn't help it, CF. I got excited.

Posted by: shortstop on February 22, 2006 at 12:22 PM | PERMALINK

Best of luck, Kevin. Maybe they'll have catblogging questions.

Posted by: b on February 22, 2006 at 12:30 PM | PERMALINK

Short: I was going for Alex Hassilev, Lou Gottlieb & Glenn Yarbough

"Have some Maderia, my dear.
You really have nothing to fear."

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 12:35 PM | PERMALINK

I tried out in 1993, passed the two written tests and failed the live audition. (I made my only two trips ever to Atlantic City that spring in order to audition.) I had trouble with the buzzer (see above.) When I finally figured it out, I was stunned into near catatonia, and was deemed not to have the right kind of personality to be on Jeopardy. I should add that (a) I am a lawyer and (b) I was doing LIVE improv performances before unfriendly audiences once a week at that time. Not the right personality, indeed! Just make the f------ buzzers more user-friendly!

Posted by: StCheryl on February 22, 2006 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

Dick Sargent and Dick York.

I'm sorry, your answer must be in the form of a question.

Posted by: Alf on February 22, 2006 at 1:11 PM | PERMALINK

The most important thing to remember is to disconnect the other two contestants' buzzers just before Double Jeopardy starts. This helped me immensely, although I was arrested later.

Posted by: adios on February 22, 2006 at 1:24 PM | PERMALINK

Indeed.

Not the right personality, indeed! Just make the f------ buzzers more user-friendly!
Posted by: StCheryl

Ain't what you know. Too right. Video game reflexes trump actual knowledge.

What, I'm wondering, constitutes the 'right' personality? And why exactly is that an issue?

Right up there with the policy which still requires female contestants to wear skirts.

Huh?

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 1:40 PM | PERMALINK

I passed the test at a tryout in NYC, but never got called.

Posted by: Randy Paul on February 22, 2006 at 2:07 PM | PERMALINK

"Alex, Who are Rick Daugherty, Bill Zorn, Mark Baiey, Andy Corwin, Red Grammer?"

No, git, the question was "Who were the Orginal Limelighters"

"it tastes so much better than beer"

Posted by: stupid git on February 22, 2006 at 2:07 PM | PERMALINK

Alex, I'll take any topic for 100,000 please.

Killer show.

Kevin, start working on your buzzer finger/thumb. Speed counts on that show.

Posted by: MarkH on February 22, 2006 at 2:56 PM | PERMALINK

Okay,Git.

Made me laugh.

"I know that girl who lives on the hill"

(Hey li lee li lee hey li lee li lee lo)

"She won't kiss me me but her sister will."

(Hey li lee li lee hey li lee li lee lo)


Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 2:57 PM | PERMALINK

And besides, it is inclined to affect me prowess...

The actual verse is "It's ever so much nicer than beer."

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 3:00 PM | PERMALINK

(Hey li lee li lee hey li lee li lee lo)

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 3:01 PM | PERMALINK

CFShep,

What, I'm wondering, constitutes the 'right' personality? And why exactly is that an issue?

You are kidding, right?

Posted by: Tripp on February 22, 2006 at 3:16 PM | PERMALINK

Yep, it is indeed all in the buzzer. I got on about 10 years ago, and even now, if you watch the show, you can see people fiddling wildly with their buzzers. Most contestants know (or think they know) most answers, so it really is a battle of the buzzer. The problems really begin when, frustrated by your inability to buzz in, you fall behind in cash, then start essentially trying to buzz on every question. Once in a while you actually get in, and then are forced to take a wild guess in a category you know little about. Before you know it your cash total is moving rapidly in reverse, you become even more desperate, and so on: you can see where this heads. Still, I had a great time. Confession: I am a lawyer. Anecdote: I mentioned to a friend (another lawyer) that I was heading out to LA to be on Jeopardy. He alowed as how being a lawyer was likely an advantage. I agreed: we're used to appearing in public, dealing with langauge every day, yada, yada. No, he said, I mean that as a lawyer you're incapable of public embarrassment.

Posted by: mainer on February 22, 2006 at 4:08 PM | PERMALINK

CFShep,

What, I'm wondering, constitutes the 'right' personality? And why exactly is that an issue?

You are kidding, right?
Posted by: Tripp

I've had Tetra with more personality than Ken Jennings. I don't see that a game which purports to be about knowledge should care about 'right personality' as a reason to exclude contestants.

Are you misunderstanding my point, sugar?

Posted by: CFShep on February 22, 2006 at 4:44 PM | PERMALINK

How was the qualifying test? Is it as full of bible questions as it was when I took it 20 years ago?

Posted by: charlie don't surf on February 22, 2006 at 6:07 PM | PERMALINK

I too was on Jeopardy about 15 years ago. It is indeed all in the buzzer. As it was explained to me at the time, you can't buzz in until Alex says the last syllable of the last word in the clue (too many people were jumping in right awat and ending up at minus $5000.) If you do, you are shut out for a period of time (I'm not sure how long, but three seconds seems like a lot.) They tape five shows in one day, so you have to bring changes of clothes in case you're on multiple days.

I had an interesting experience when I answered the question "The name of this daughter of King Lear is also Irish Gaelic for "little king." I guessed O'Regan, figuring the "O" would translate to the little part. Alex told me I was wrong, but a judge yelled out I was right. Alex said "no, he's wrong,it's Regan," and the judge said "he's right." They cut out all of the talking when they edited the show, but you can see me looking back and forth. You can imagine who's side I was on. They didn't give it to me, and I spent months sure that I'd been robbed, until I actually got to see the show. The daughter of King Lear is Regan, so the whole Gaelic translation thing is moot. This is a long way of saying that there's often a giveaway in the clue, like "This first President of the US collected stamps," which gets people trying to figure out who collected stamps, and ignoring the first President part.

By the way, I finished second (the only one to get final jeopardy right) and got a La-Z-Boy recliner and love seat, which I didn't even take because they valued them so high the taxes wouldn't have been worth it. All in all, a very disappointing experience.

Posted by: Chris on February 22, 2006 at 7:40 PM | PERMALINK

awesome kevin, go get em

Posted by: forgetting on February 22, 2006 at 11:12 PM | PERMALINK

Ok, me too - was on Jeaporday way back in 86, to toatally screwed up by the buzzer, and after leading the whole way, lost by $100 to a guy who went on to win 5 times (the maximum allowed back then) - was so distraught, spent the evening drinking in a hot tub in Venice to console myself!

If you get on, I'd ggogle every interview with Ken Jennings - because the guy really did have the buzzer part down cold.

And just out of curiosity wonder how many readers/commenters on the Right-Wing blogs have passed the Jeopardy test or been on? I don't imagine they'd accept "The Lord God Almighty: if the correct answer was "Charles Darwin."

(Hoping to atone, tried out twice for Who wants to be a Millionaire, passed the test both times, never got called - - anybody got any clues for getting on THAT show?

Posted by: mldos on February 23, 2006 at 6:59 AM | PERMALINK

>>"The name of this daughter of King Lear is also Irish Gaelic for "little king." I guessed O'Regan, figuring the "O" would translate to the little part. Alex told me I was wrong, but a judge yelled out I was right. Alex said "no, he's wrong,it's Regan," and the judge said "he's right." They cut out all of the talking when they edited the show, but you can see me looking back and forth. You can imagine who's side I was on. They didn't give it to me, and I spent months sure that I'd been robbed, until I actually got to see the show.


Hey, Chris, I remember this. I still think you wuz robbed, guy.

Posted by: CFShep on February 23, 2006 at 10:30 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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