Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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March 28, 2006
By: Kevin Drum

NEW BOSS....Apologies for the lack of posting this morning. I woke up sick, and now that I'm down at the computer I just can't work up any excitement over today's big news: the resignation of Andy Card and his replacement by Josh Bolten. However, feel free to sneer in comments while I try to find something else to write about.

Kevin Drum 12:51 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (61)

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Comments

I guess Card's decided to spend more time with his lawyers.

Posted by: Derelict on March 28, 2006 at 12:54 PM | PERMALINK

I guess "Brownie" wasn't available.

Posted by: David W. on March 28, 2006 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

From what I read, it's the same stuff on a different day. Fiercely loyal to Bush to a fault, which means that it is very likely that nobody will see any improvement out of the White House in the policy department.

Posted by: Christopher Smith on March 28, 2006 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

* sneer *

Posted by: Doofus on March 28, 2006 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

It signifies a return to glory for the White House.

Posted by: Red State Mike on March 28, 2006 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

One possibility I haven't seen explicitly raised is that this admin may not be able to bring in 'new blood' from outside their clique because there is so much dirt there they can't risk the chance that someone see it who wouldn't personally 'go down' if it were to come out. I'm 40, and have never seen an administration so unwilling to bring in new personnel. Surely there is some explanation for it, whether rational or not.

Posted by: nightshift66 on March 28, 2006 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

Derelict: I guess Card's decided to spend more time with his lawyers.

Superb!

Andy was always telling people he wanted to top Truman's guy's record for longest-lasting chief of staff. He's coming up about a year short. A little pushy-shovey out the door for Card?

Posted by: shortstop on March 28, 2006 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

It signifies a return to glory for the White House.

Oh yeah. Card was the problem.

Posted by: frankly0 on March 28, 2006 at 1:00 PM | PERMALINK

Well, Weinberger died and the AP failed to mention Iran contra, his indictment, or his Christmas Eve pardon from Bush I in their initial story. They get a couple of nice quotes ("a great American," "one of the best Cabinet officers I've known") from Republicans though. I suppose we all should really miss him.

Posted by: JJF on March 28, 2006 at 1:00 PM | PERMALINK

nightshift66: One possibility I haven't seen explicitly raised is that this admin may not be able to bring in 'new blood' from outside their clique because there is so much dirt there they can't risk the chance that someone see it who wouldn't personally 'go down' if it were to come out.

Interesting and highly plausible. The fact that the Rove and Card factions have been warring thus puts Bush in an even worse situation.

Posted by: shortstop on March 28, 2006 at 1:01 PM | PERMALINK

The old cliche about rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic comes to mind.

Posted by: Joe Buck on March 28, 2006 at 1:01 PM | PERMALINK

What I asked Kevin was whether he thought Card was forced out (talk for two weeks now of shaking up the cabinet) or whether he's a rat jumping ship. I vote for the latter as WH chiefs of staff only have as much power as the president grants them. In other words, he probably had very little, and I doubt Uncle Dick and Rummy pay attention to anything anyone tells them anyway.

Posted by: Jeff II on March 28, 2006 at 1:01 PM | PERMALINK

I thought there was so much talk for so long about Card taking a different position in the administration. Isn't it possible there is something else going on here? A straight-out resignation?? Hmmm. Not like a Bushie appointee not to continue the ride on the Free Money Train.

Posted by: Walt on March 28, 2006 at 1:03 PM | PERMALINK

Abramoff for director of the Office of Management and Budget!

Gotta stay in the clique.

Posted by: Jeremy on March 28, 2006 at 1:03 PM | PERMALINK

With Card gone, someone else is going to have to fetch W's cheeseburgers. Read Billmon (second block quote).

Posted by: JJF on March 28, 2006 at 1:05 PM | PERMALINK

Prediction: This presidency will get worse.

Posted by: gq on March 28, 2006 at 1:06 PM | PERMALINK

Thank god the adults are back in charge! the way Bolten ran the country's finances means he's obviously well qualified to be the chief of staff of a lame duck presidency.

Posted by: northzax on March 28, 2006 at 1:06 PM | PERMALINK

Just more whitewash.

Meaningless nothingness disguised as accomplishment.

Posted by: kmsor on March 28, 2006 at 1:08 PM | PERMALINK

How I love to watch the morn,
With golden sun that shines,
Up above to nicely warm
These frosty toes of mine.

The wind doth taste of bittersweet,
Like jasper wine and sugar,
I bet its blown through others feet,
Like those of Caspar Weinberger.

RIB

Posted by: Matt on March 28, 2006 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

Any relation to Dick Chaney's "protg" John Bolton?

Posted by: Jon Karak on March 28, 2006 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

Perfect time to roll out a new product.

Posted by: lib on March 28, 2006 at 1:14 PM | PERMALINK

Ben Domenech was not available?

Posted by: nut on March 28, 2006 at 1:15 PM | PERMALINK

Finally, somebody (lib) mentions his greatest achievement.

How long before articles start appearing in the Emm Ess Emm about how "already, the shakeup in the White House is having a positive results"? I give it 6 days or whenever NEWSWEEK first has a chance to write about it, whichever comes first. Bonus points if the article tells us we the people believe it was a good move. Wait for it.

Posted by: KPatrick on March 28, 2006 at 1:19 PM | PERMALINK

When there were reports of fault-lines in the White House particularly focussed on Fitzgerald's investigation, Card was generally portrayed as being on the opposite side of those lines from Rove. Don't know about Bolten.

Perhaps something to that? I don't know, thought I'd throw it out, though.

Posted by: cmdicely on March 28, 2006 at 1:19 PM | PERMALINK

Do you suppose the Tony is some other guy sub-plot is over with on the Sopranos?


Posted by: Ace Franze on March 28, 2006 at 1:28 PM | PERMALINK

Now Andy Card reacquires his title "Secretary Card".

Cheney was "Secretary Cheney prior to becoming VeeP.

Like he's been Knighted for life.

Posted by: ejstevens on March 28, 2006 at 1:29 PM | PERMALINK


KEVIN DRUM: I just can't work up any excitement over today's big news: the resignation of Andy Card and his replacement by Josh Bolten. However, feel free to sneer in comments while I try to find something else to write about.

Yeah, that story is so much more important than the little trifle about fraudulent Senate floor transcripts being submitted as evidence before the Supreme Court. Much bigger too than a panel of five FISA judges telling a Senate committee that Bush is bound by the FISA law.

But Republican senators and presidents breaking laws is nothing new. Nothing to write home about. How about some more incisive religious commentary?


Posted by: jayarbee on March 28, 2006 at 1:35 PM | PERMALINK

cmdicely: Perhaps something to that? I don't know, thought I'd throw it out, though.

Thanks. I already had.

Posted by: shortstop on March 28, 2006 at 1:38 PM | PERMALINK

Card is the "shake-up"!

Wow, with changes like these it's same old line Bush has been using with the Iraq war, "stay the course". And look where that has gotten the US and Iraq - one bad decision after another into the long hard slog and that gets slogger by the week.

The Nations sez...

...the transplant operation that removed Andrew Card (a former lobbyist for the automobile industry) as White House chief of staff and replaced him with Joshua Bolten, the White House budget director. George W. Bush did not select someone who might have a slightly different perspective on his administration. Bolten has been in the White House since Bush was first inaugurated. Moreover, he has overseen one of the larger disasters of the Bush presidency: its fiscal policy. Here's how those radicals at The Washington Post editorial board recently described the situation:

President Bush has presided over a 46 percent increase in the federal debt, from about $5.6 trillion [to about $8.8 trillion]. By contrast, during President Bill Clinton's two terms, the debt grew from less than $4 trillion to $5.6 trillion, a 28 percent increase -- and during the last few years of his presidency, Mr. Clinton actually began to pay down the country's "real" debt....

I wonder if Howard Kurtz is going to write that "it's that wonderful old Bush" (Bush cultims dies hard) that one hat everyone use to love - and Kutz just loved the way Bush came out and took reporter Helen's questions to task and how that supposedly made the liberals look bad again.

But it was a bust speech that made Bush look as bad as ever, still determined not to make changes. The American public saw the same old Bush and that's the problem - and I noted how Howard Kurtz woke up and smelled the coffee on his very next column - what a laugh.

And it seems that Patrick Fiztgerald is still making inroads to the heart of Bush sickness.

Rove is cracking and it is suppose to be giving libby "heartburn" but I'm sure it must be giving Dick Cheney's pace-maker the need for an overhaul. Patrick must be back by some conservatives whom seem genuinely intent on cracking this administration and making it bleed. Libby is going to have to make a pleading to Patrick - Patrick might as well be working Libby over with a tire iron. torture does work the words do and as they old saying goes, word are mighter then the sword, especially legal wording, and when that happens Dick Cheney is toast.

Since I think Cheney is the key to everything awful in this whole ugly, corrupt administration - taking out Cheney will also make his sock puppet fold. Bush doesn't know what to say without his both his baby-sitter's Karl and Cheney. I say the light at the end of the tunnel is going to be a legal locomotive by the name of Patrick Fiztgerald.

Posted by: Cheryl on March 28, 2006 at 1:43 PM | PERMALINK

If Kevin Drum wants something to write about, here's an idea.

The Georgia "immigration" rally was organized by a former Mexican Consul General.

Was he ordered or allowed to organize that "mobilization" by his former employer?

Has the Mexican government obtained not just political power but physical force inside our country?

What will most Americans think of those who give in, such as by passing any sort of amnesty or "guest" worker scheme? Won't many Americans think of those responsible as little more than Quislings?

Should the Democratic Party support Bush's goal of flooding the U.S. with cheap labor and the concomitant loss of U.S. sovereignty, or should they oppose that?

Posted by: TLB on March 28, 2006 at 2:04 PM | PERMALINK

i also tend to agree with nightshift66, although my particular version has always been that however pathetic we all think bush probably is in person, he's worse, and they wouldn't dare bring in an outsider who didn't know all the behavioral cues and codes and so forth.

Posted by: howard on March 28, 2006 at 2:07 PM | PERMALINK

please get better soon, my wonderful darling.

Posted by: lucretius on March 28, 2006 at 2:23 PM | PERMALINK

Should the Democratic Party support Bush's goal of flooding the U.S. with cheap labor and the concomitant loss of U.S. sovereignty, or should they oppose that? Posted by: TLB

Oppose it. America is overpopulated. We only need so many day laborers and gardners. And as the Republican party is hostile to public education to the point that it won't fund it properly, our school system is sure to produce plenty of poorly educated, language "challenged" yoot to replace the Mexicans we will be excluding.

On the bright side, before long our neglected public education system will be turning out so many academic failures that we will be able to compete with China again in manufacturing!

"Behind every cloud . . ."

Posted by: Jeff II on March 28, 2006 at 2:29 PM | PERMALINK

TLB,

Don't you ever get tired of paranoid speculation and scaremongering about Mexico conquering the US?

Posted by: cmdicely on March 28, 2006 at 2:31 PM | PERMALINK

as far as i'm concerned the only staff change that would have made any difference would have been Karl Rove being exiled to, i dunno, Iraq or say, Antarctica without a sat phone.

this? means nothing.

Posted by: e1 on March 28, 2006 at 2:33 PM | PERMALINK

Don't you ever get tired of paranoid speculation and scaremongering about Mexico conquering the US?

cmdicely, clearly TLB doesn't. so why sweat it?

Posted by: e1 on March 28, 2006 at 2:35 PM | PERMALINK

Dan Froomkin bolsters JJF's remark:

"Card spent many hours of his legendarily long work days aggressively monitoring -- and limiting -- the information flow to the president. 'The president has to have time to eat, sleep and be merry, or he'll make angry, grumpy decisions,' Card said in a 2004 radio interview described in this column . 'So I have to make sure he has time to eat, sleep and be merry. But I also have to make sure he has the right time to do the right thing for the country, and that he gets the right information in time, rather than too late.'"

So I guess we'd all better hope the new guy can draw Bush's bath at just the proper temperature, or else we might be seeing even worse decisions....

Posted by: sglover on March 28, 2006 at 2:36 PM | PERMALINK

Rove channeling the General?

Hes soft-spoken but very clear thinking, said Karl Rove, Bushs chief political adviser. I love him in an entirely appropriate way. Hes a wonderful person. Hes professionally and personally one of the best people Ive ever worked with.

http://www.law.stanford.edu/publications/lawyer/issues/69/bolten.html

Posted by: es on March 28, 2006 at 2:43 PM | PERMALINK

Card said in a 2004 radio interview described in this column . 'So I have to make sure he has time to eat, sleep and be merry.

eat, sleep and be merry for tomorrow we die {sic}

Posted by: e1 on March 28, 2006 at 2:49 PM | PERMALINK

card will forever be seen on videotape whispering into gwb's ear in that florida classroom on 9-11 telling the frat boy wonder...

"america is under attack.."

and gwb did what any red blooded american would do...

he showed chutzpah and courage as he stated "bring it on" and flew back to d.c.


eventually...

Posted by: thisspaceavailable on March 28, 2006 at 3:05 PM | PERMALINK

Andy Card resigning is not the big news of the day.

The BIG news of the day (though you wouldn't know it from CNN MSNBC, etc.) is here:

"According to one source close to the case, Rove is providing information on deleted emails, erased hard drives and other types of obstruction by staff and other officials in the Vice President's office. Pentagon sources close to Rove confirmed this account."

http://www.rawstory.com/news/2006/Roves_cooperation_seen_to_advance_inquiry_0327.html

Posted by: Robert Earle on March 28, 2006 at 3:09 PM | PERMALINK

Off topic but did anyone eles notice CN hasn't been back since his ass was handed to him for linking to a Ann Coulter site.Not very proud anymore.

Posted by: Right minded on March 28, 2006 at 3:22 PM | PERMALINK

I thought it was sweet of W to bring in Bolton, who can sing his hit "How Am I Supposed To Live Without You" as a going-away present for Andy.

Oh, wait. Wrong Bolton. Never mind. ;-)

Is there any chance that Karl arranged for Card to be implicated in the "missing" emails he's allegedly tipped Fitz to? Throwing Card under the train to distract investigators from his own trails sounds like Captain Karl to me.

Posted by: biggerbox on March 28, 2006 at 3:22 PM | PERMALINK

"free to sneer in comments while I try to find something else to write about"

Wow - is this a passive aggressive one-finger salute to the comments section? Why not get rid of it altogther if you view it as worthless? Hopefully, I'm misreading this comment

Posted by: Aidan on March 28, 2006 at 3:58 PM | PERMALINK

My criticism of Card is the same as with Kinsley and Forbes: they never blink! Something has to be wrong with a fellow who never blinks.

Posted by: Hedley Lamarr on March 28, 2006 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

Hedley,
What about someone like Bush who blinks too much? Perhaps Card and Bush balance each other out so, on average, they are closer to the mean.

Posted by: gq on March 28, 2006 at 4:48 PM | PERMALINK

Kevin--

I'm on the 4th day of the shortest cold I've had in my life. Not even coughing today, when usually I can count on 2-3 days sore throat, 3-5 days runny nose/stuffy head, a month of coughing. I've been taking one oreganol pill and 3 doses of sambucol elderberry extract a day. I'm having a lot of insomnia, but it is well worth it.

(Just thought I'd pass that along, in case it's useful to you.)

Posted by: catherineD on March 28, 2006 at 5:28 PM | PERMALINK

Aidan -- I don't read Kevin's comment as flipping us off-- I think it's just a light remark.
Also -- has no one made a joke about "Card shuffling"?

Posted by: Barry on March 28, 2006 at 5:45 PM | PERMALINK

Matt on March 28, 2006 at 1:09 PM:

I bet its blown through others feet, Like those of Caspar Weinberger.

OPUS!...Oh how I miss the halcyon days of Bill the Cat...

shortstop/cmdicely:

Perhaps something to that?

Yep, I remember something like that as well...From MSNBC:

HOWARD FINEMAN, NBC CHIEF POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT: Thats the point of the lance of this whole thing.
Right now, my sense, in reporting this, Chris, is that the Bush family, political family, is at war with itself inside the White House. My sense is, its Andy Card, the chief of staff, and his people against Karl Rove, the brain.
MATTHEWS: Right.
FINEMAN: And that runs through a whole lot of things, whether its Harriet Miers or Katrina. But it all starts with Iraq.
And some submerged, but now emerging divisions within the administration over why we went into that war, how we went into that war and what was done to sell it. There are people are out for Karl Rove inside that White House, which makes his situation even more perilous.
My understanding, from talking to somebody quite close to this investigation, is that they think there are going to be indictments and possibly Karl Rove could be among them, if not for the act of the leaking information about Valerie Plame, then perhaps for perjury, because hes now testified four times.
And there are conflicts between what Matt Cooper told the grand jury and what Rove evidently told the jury himself. And Patrick Fitzgerald, the prosecutor, is an absolute stickler for detail who has no political axe to grind here, other than keeping his own credibility. Having put Judy Miller in jail, having gone to the lengths he had, my understand is, he has got some people here, not only Rove, but perhaps Scooter Libby, the vice presidents chief of staff.
MATTHEWS: Let me ask you, you just raised a curtain-raiser for me. I didnt even know this.
You believe that the fight between those who may be headed toward indictment, the vice presidents chief of staff, Karl Rove, there is a war between them and the people who are going to survive them, Andy Card, etcetera.
FINEMAN: Yes.

'The people who are going to survive them, Andy Card, et cetera'...A wee bit off on that one...

Posted by: grape_crush on March 28, 2006 at 6:04 PM | PERMALINK

'The people who are going to survive them, Andy Card, et cetera'...A wee bit off on that one...
Posted by: grape_crush

Maybe. I guess it depends on whether he pays a "courtesy" call to Mr. Fitzgerald or not.

Posted by: Jeff II on March 28, 2006 at 6:21 PM | PERMALINK
'The people who are going to survive them, Andy Card, et cetera'...A wee bit off on that one...

Andy Card survived, in tenure in public office, "the Vice President's Chief of Staff."

It remains to be seen if "etcetera" outlasts Karl Rove, I suppose.

Posted by: cmdicely on March 28, 2006 at 6:32 PM | PERMALINK

Jeff II on March 28, 2006 at 6:21 PM:

I guess it depends on whether he pays a "courtesy" call to Mr. Fitzgerald or not.

Wouldn't that be an interesting development...

cmdicely on March 28, 2006 at 6:32 PM:

It remains to be seen if "etcetera" outlasts Karl Rove, I suppose.

More fun stuff, this time from Slate:

"This, you know, will be seen as one of those crossroads, a moment of causation, and everything after this will be prefaced by 'After Karen Hughes left.' " Then he stops. He sees it clearly, and it's very personal. "She's leaving when the president has one of the highest approval ratings on record. From here, it can only go down. And when it does, you know who they're going to blame." He taps his chest. "They're gonna blame Andy Card!"
..."I'll need designees, people trusted by the president that I can elevate for various needs to balance against Karl." And then he ticks off a fewlike Tucker Eskew, Dan Bartlett, Mary Matalin, Ari Fleischer, speechwriter Michael Gerson. "They are going to have to really step up, but it won't be easy. Karl is a formidable adversary."

I wonder if any of the names listed above qualify as 'et cetera?...Eskew and Bartlett still show up on the white house bio pages...The others, not so much...

Oh, and maybe add Colin Powell to the 'et ceteras' as well.

Posted by: grape_crush on March 28, 2006 at 7:12 PM | PERMALINK

Tucker Eskew, Dan Bartlett, Mary Matalin, Ari Fleischer, speechwriter Michael Gerson.

so, per an upthread link to a Rawstory story, Rovie is essentially throwing the Veep's office under the bus in order to save himself.
Card-o-man hoped that the above mentioned people would be still be around after Rovie chewed him up and spit him out in order to "balance against" ole TurdBlossom. 'cept, as grape_crush notes, most didn't even last that long.
So, what we've got here, is, even less of a balance against Rovie, who's trying to do anything to stay outta jail. and powerful desperate people are scary indeed.

Posted by: e1 on March 28, 2006 at 8:19 PM | PERMALINK

Setting aside the Fitzgerald aspect for the moment, this will I believe have significant long term ripples on the political dynamic both within the WH and without. Whatever else one wants to say about to what goals Card was willing to place his skills towards he certainly was one of the most competent people within the WH senior levels from the outset. Not only in terms of managing Bush's schedule to keep him comfortable and well rested (Incidentally, does that seem as strange to others as it does to me? I mean really, how often prior to this President was the well rested and well recreated President as significant an issue within a Presidency aside from one recovering from a serious medical aliment of some type? I wouldn't have thought a lack of such stamina was a good quality for the job but the reverse.) but also in implementing the nuts and bolts of running the day to day operations of this WH.

Rove is the strategist and certainly encroached on the traditional turf of the WH CoS, yet it was Card that made the machinery work more than anyone else. I have to wonder just how many rough spots he has been smoothing over for the last five years are suddenly going to start a multiple cascade failure throughout the machinery that has been the Bush WH. Frankly I do not get the sense that Bolton is up to the job, it is not like he has performed well in his current position from the looks of things.

In terms of this being anything remotely resembling a shake-up of the Bush WH in terms of overall strategy and positions, not one whit I'd say. As others have already noted Bolton is also someone involved in this Administration from the outset and was Card's CoS before his current position. In almost any other WH the loss of such a senior CoS would be far more significant on the policy side of the WH, but since this is a purely political and not at all policy structured/orientated WH most of the real power here lies still with Rove.

Now, if Rove is gone for whatever reason then I think one would see a real drastic impact within this WH's operations and abilities to cope with the world around them, not that they have been doing all that good a job to begin with. Card I think will be most felt in his ability to manage Bush through his day to day "hard work" being a "war President" making "the hard decisions" to protect America from the "terrorists". Unfortunately though Bush appears to think terrorists work a standard business day schedule by the way he actually operates, not to mention take month long vacations in the summer and at least another month or two broken up through the rest of the year.

So in terms of altering the direction and intent of this WH I see Card's departure as having no impact. In terms of managing Bush himself through his days and interfacing that with the day to day requirements on the President of the United States of America though I suspect a fairly significant impact will be noticed, and I suspect it may well increase in strength over time rather than decrease it. Not exactly what they would want going into the midterms. This all of course presupposes no other departures over the next several months. I rather doubt additions without departures will occur, especially in the seats where the power truly flows through in this Administration. If or no other reason who would be willing to carry the stink of failure through the rest of their career if they were brought in to help turn things around but couldn't, particularly because the people that brought you in did not let you do the job they asked of you in the first place. Not exactly an unlikely scenario in this Administration.

Posted by: Scotian on March 28, 2006 at 9:12 PM | PERMALINK

What if Card WAS the only marginally competent person in the Bush White House?

Posted by: scotus on March 28, 2006 at 9:22 PM | PERMALINK

So, let's see ... why would someone quit? Hmmm. Could it have to do with bad pay (relative to the private sector)? Or not wanting to deal with some folks you really don't like or enjoy, who are against you at key points? If that's not enough, just consider what a crappy role it is. In good times, you are just a cog, a virtual traffic cop in the highway travelled by sycophants and egotists. In bad times you are in the lilne of fire big time; the following was copied from Macsmind blog: "Andy had a better memory than Clinton's absent minded COS, who testified in court or before Congress said that they didn't remember, didn't know, or something similar during their (short) service.

To wit:

Mack McLarty 233 times.
John Podesta 264 times."

Only a masochist would want this job, and 2-3 years in the role should be about enough to have one staring at the door. He did 5.5 years and that's pretty impressive as a mesure of loyalty. And we are looking for "the reason"?

Posted by: Terry Ott on March 28, 2006 at 11:02 PM | PERMALINK

Terry, you destroy a perfectly fine point (not one i agree with: only a week ago, the bush regime was saying that there was no need for any change) about burnout in a difficult job with a perfectly inane quote from some know-nothing. who would take the time to count up "don't remember" or "don't know" in congressional testimony and consider it a valid indicator of anything?

meanwhile, let's see what happens if card testifies in the libby trial. I'll bet you any reasonable sum you'd care to name as a donation to any charity you'd care to identify (mine is www.heifer.org) that card will manage to "not remember" something if he does....

Posted by: howard on March 29, 2006 at 1:09 AM | PERMALINK

The more things change, the more they stay the same....

Posted by: Stephen Kriz on March 29, 2006 at 6:48 AM | PERMALINK

Terry Ott, If burnout due to politics was the issue for Card, why wouldn't it have occurred earlier in his political career? The guy's been a legislator, government official, or lobbyist since 1975...

There's this from the article Kev linked to:

Card offered his resignation earlier this month, saying it would be best for the president.

Huh? No mention of stress...Then there's this article from the Boston Globe:

"I have always found Andy Card to be reasonable, professional, and a man of his word," said Senator Richard J. Durbin, Democrat of Illinois. "If the White House is looking to change course, they picked the wrong person to toss overboard."
They need to bring in some experienced hands to give them a hand," said Senator Trent Lott, Republican of Mississippi. ''I do think they need some more disparate voices over there at the White House."
Massachusetts GOP lobbyist Ron Kaufman, Card's close friend, said Card probably has offered his resignation "more than once. I think it was hard for the president."

Don't get me wrong, burnout in just about any job is more than possible, but it looks like Card was born for this job...So, yes, I'm looking for a reason.

Posted by: grape_crush on March 29, 2006 at 7:03 AM | PERMALINK

Setting aside the Fitzgerald aspect for the moment, this will I believe have significant long term ripples on the political dynamic both within the WH and without. Posted by: Scotian

What "long term"? The Bush presidency has effectly one more year to fuck up the country, and then he wouldn't be able to pass legislation proclaiming that swimming can be fun.

After next Fall, there will be a significant change in one if not both houses. Even if there isn't a Democratic majority in either house, there will be a number of scummy Republicans replaced - Ney, DeLay and about half of California's representatives will be replaced. There are probably more between now and next Fall who will be linked to Abramoff or some other pathetic malfesance.

Again, the biggest mistake that the Dems since they did not have the power to fight legislation was not preventing Roberts and Alito from being confirmed.

Posted by: Jeff II on March 29, 2006 at 10:46 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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