Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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June 17, 2006
By: Kevin Drum

BLOGGING vs. REAL LIFE....I don't suppose I really have a serious point to make here, but I was browsing the New York Times this morning and noticed that their list of Top 10 emailed stories doesn't have a single entry in common with their list of Top 10 blogged stories. Draw your own conclusions.


Kevin Drum 2:32 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (31)

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I didn't read all twenty articles. However, I can't help but notice that-- based on the headlines-- the "MOST BLOGGED" appear far more hard news-y than the most emailed ones. Advantage: BLogosphere.

It's also a question of how meaningful "Most blogged" is. Does an obscure blog that 12 people read count as much as dailykos? If so, it's not exactly clear what it's meaningful in measuring.

Posted by: American Hawk on June 17, 2006 at 2:40 PM | PERMALINK

Cheney did it!

Posted by: Keith G on June 17, 2006 at 2:43 PM | PERMALINK

In addition to the good points raised by American Hawk, just how many emails does "most emailed" represent? What they don't know, btw, is how many people simply paste the link into their own email and send it to their friends, rather than give their friends' email addresses to the story publisher. I don't think I've ever used anything but my own email or Instant Messenger to give a friend a heads' up.

If the story is already being blogged on dK or some other blog I read (including Political Animal), and there's a link in the blog post to the story, I'll be more likely to send the blog's permalink instead of the newspaper story.

Posted by: Ducktape on June 17, 2006 at 2:45 PM | PERMALINK

I suspect that "most e-mailed" is the modern equivalent of news clippings that parents and grandparents send young people living away from home with the note "I thought you might be interested in this." The only exception I see to that in the list is #6 about the Hudson decision. The rest are the "human-interest/this is helpful to read" sort of articles.

Posted by: Constantine on June 17, 2006 at 3:02 PM | PERMALINK


KEVIN DRUM: BLOGGING vs. REAL LIFE

Emailing is more real life than blogging? I guess it depends on one's life...and one's reality.


Posted by: jayarbee on June 17, 2006 at 3:02 PM | PERMALINK

It shows the NYT being more a business with broader appeal than the blogs. Many readers of the former simply don't care what is happening to the country.

Posted by: Hedley Lamarr on June 17, 2006 at 3:03 PM | PERMALINK

I would go even farther than jayarbee and say POLITICAL blogging vs real life.

I'm sure that many people are blogging about things on the most e-mailed list, but because many of those blogging sites are specialized, the news doesn't get so widespread. OTOH, political blogs are so interconnected that even a minor story can become blogged widespread in the political arena.

Posted by: zAmboni on June 17, 2006 at 3:18 PM | PERMALINK

Simple. If it's getting covered in the blogs, you don't have to email an MSM story about it.

Posted by: lina on June 17, 2006 at 3:31 PM | PERMALINK

Kevin,

I think the third of those tabs is the most interesting - Search. It tells you what people are looking for at the NYT:

1. ring tone
2. world cup
3. china
4. immigration
5. iraq
6. bush
7. college
8. india
9. iran
10. ann coulter

All three tabs lack the one thing that would make the information truely relevant, which is how much traffic does this represent? How often was something emailed, blogged or searched? On searches, what kind of results are the searchers getting? When they get their search results, which news items are they clicking on?

This is interesting information, but not very informative without a sense of how much actitivity it represents.

fercryinoutloud

Posted by: fercryinoutloud on June 17, 2006 at 4:27 PM | PERMALINK

I confess I didn't read that "Your Money: Advice to All You Graduates: Let's Start With that Daily Latte..." but I think we can predict in advance what it says.

The kids graduating from college today are from generation y, but I'll bet the writer of the article is a boomer, and I'll bet it speaks volumes about all the ways boomers never quite figured out how to market to my generation (x).

One doesn't like to engage in unhealthy stereotyping, but I think I know something about my own tribe, and it happens to be fleshed out by market research. We don't skip the lattes - life is too short. What we skip are the 55k BMWs and SUVs that drop to nothing in value five years from now, the 5k shabby chic sofas, and the $2500 Gucci luggage - all the vain, stupid junk the boomers blew their potential retirement savings on in the 1980s and 90s.

In my view, and apparently the view of many in my generation, everyone should a live a little everyday, but blowing your hard earned dough on stupid status symbols that will not just likely but certainly depreciate in value in a few years is plainly braindead. If you're going to buy nice things, make sure they're old and likely to increase in value or otherwise likely to increase in value.

Posted by: Linus on June 17, 2006 at 5:13 PM | PERMALINK

For what it's worth, most of the people I email articles to are sure to have already read the "hard news."

Posted by: Moe is me on June 17, 2006 at 5:19 PM | PERMALINK

Most net savvy bloggers wouldnt waste their time trying to use the NYT due to their cumpuslory registration quackeries.

http://nytimes.blogspace.com/genlink

http://www.majcher.com/nytview.html


Posted by: Rove on June 17, 2006 at 5:48 PM | PERMALINK

How do I fit into all of this?

Posted by: As Seen On TV on June 17, 2006 at 6:27 PM | PERMALINK

The emailed articles seem to mostly be regular people showing each other private interest - whereas the blogged articles are of public interest.

The emailed ones are what I might share over the water cooler, the blooged ones are what I might personally search out, read, and use.

Posted by: Crissa on June 17, 2006 at 6:29 PM | PERMALINK

Also, I don't think emailed really matters - email is not instant communication. None of the emailed articles are ones of instant importance.

Blogged means someone put a live link, now, not some note to look up later.

Posted by: Crissa on June 17, 2006 at 6:30 PM | PERMALINK

You guys have some good thoughts, but you miss the point that the "most blogged" to "most emailed" comparison on the NYT site is an apples to oranges comparison in multiple ways.

First, the default screen for most emailed is the last 24 hours, while the default for most blogged is the last 3 days. You can view 24 hours, 7 days or 30 days for most emailed; 3 days, 7 days or 30 days for most blogged.

Second, most bloggers are a relatively small subset of the universe of people who would email stories to other people. Technically, they may not be a subset, as there may be bloggers who would never email a story through the NYT interface. Regardless, whether they are intersecting groups or one is a subset of the other the fact remains that bloggers are a smaller group that is not randomly selected from among emailers. It is no surprise then that their selection of topics - over any time period - would vary significantly.

Peace.

- Southjaw
ImpeachableTreason.com

Posted by: Southjaw on June 17, 2006 at 7:21 PM | PERMALINK

"Draw your own conclusions."

By the time I checked the list, one story--the one on wikipedia--was in the top 10 on both lists. And the editorial about "don't bother to knock" was 10 on the email list and 18 on the blogger list.

Posted by: PTate in MN on June 17, 2006 at 8:11 PM | PERMALINK

Hmm. Gives me an excuse to rant about the patheticness of the Pogue article. With a title like "A Flash Drive that holds your Computer", I fscking well expect an article on some breakthrough technology that has dramatically lowered the cost of flash. But no, what we get is some PR puff piece on some people selling some weirdo version of Win XP that can boot from Flash --- ooh, what a breakthrough in technology.

Great David, when you're done kissing these guy's asses, perhaps you'll explain to me exactly how a 1GiB flash drive will hold "my computer", a laptop which right now has about 50GiB of data stored on it. Moron.
And it's not even like he can argue "Well, by computer, I meant your text-based computer environment". He says in the article
"Ceedo is working on fixes for some programs, including iTunes and Microsoft Outlook. That's fortunate, because your e-mail and music collections are great candidates for portability."
Sure they are. My 1 GiB mail and 22 GiB audio collections will fit just fine on a 4GiB flash drive. Moron, moron, moron.

Posted by: Maynard Handley on June 17, 2006 at 8:31 PM | PERMALINK

The article from today's NYT on "'Star Trek' Fans, Deprived of a Show, Recreate the Franchise on Digital Video" wasn't on either list.

What can we conclude from THAT?

Posted by: PTate in MN on June 17, 2006 at 8:42 PM | PERMALINK

RE: New York Times article Iceland's Ring Road: The Ultimate Road Trip

Perhaps readers are encouraging frinds and relatives to see it before all the glaciers melt ...

Posted by: Donald from Hawaii on June 17, 2006 at 8:43 PM | PERMALINK

Seems pretty straightforward to me: Bloggers are interested in the issues of gravitas. I'm sure the road-trip in Iceland is breathtaking, but right now I am more stunned and breathless at the audacity of my government.

Posted by: Global Citizen on June 17, 2006 at 8:55 PM | PERMALINK

I some how doubt that there is any utility gained from comparing (political) blogging to real life. About real life, it ain't.

Posted by: Keith G on June 17, 2006 at 8:56 PM | PERMALINK

Global Citizen, long time no see. It's good to see ya round these parts.

Posted by: Keith G on June 17, 2006 at 8:58 PM | PERMALINK

Keith g: Thanks! I've been really busy - switched jobs, finished the semester, started summer school, teaching and studying...My own site went untouched for a couple of weeks!

Posted by: Global Citizen on June 17, 2006 at 9:14 PM | PERMALINK

Global Citizen: Don't miss out on a chance to link whore! Assuming your website is for public consumption, how about a link?

Posted by: American Hawk on June 18, 2006 at 12:04 AM | PERMALINK

Globe! How the hell you been?!

Posted by: shortstop on June 18, 2006 at 12:08 AM | PERMALINK

Hey Globe, nice to see you back. Hope you and the colonel are well.

Glad to see you're still out there keeping Matt Blunt honest -- or at least reminding him that there is such a concept -- and attempting to explain it to him with shadow puppets and flash cards.

Posted by: Windhorse on June 18, 2006 at 12:30 AM | PERMALINK
One doesn't like to engage in unhealthy stereotyping, but I think I know something about my own tribe, and it happens to be fleshed out by market research. We don't skip the lattes - life is too short. What we skip are the 55k BMWs and SUVs that drop to nothing in value five years from now, the 5k shabby chic sofas, and the $2500 Gucci luggage - all the vain, stupid junk the boomers blew their potential retirement savings on in the 1980s and 90s.

Bullshit.

If people from generation X haven't bought expensive houses or cars it is probably because they are too heavily in debt and cannot afford them (many buy or even worse lease expensive new cars anyway). And who says lattes are not status symbols in their own way?

The baby boomers do not have a monopoly on borrowing money to buy stupid shit that they cannot afford. If anything, my generation (whatever they are labeling it these days) will be much, much worse.

Posted by: Anonymous on June 18, 2006 at 12:49 AM | PERMALINK

"And who says lattes are not status symbols in their own way?"

Not if you drink them in secret.

Posted by: Linus on June 19, 2006 at 2:07 AM | PERMALINK

Men blog, women e-mail.

Posted by: Steve Sailer on June 19, 2006 at 2:09 AM | PERMALINK

明星
here
here
here
song

star

Posted by: 45454 on June 19, 2006 at 5:18 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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