Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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January 3, 2007
By: Kevin Drum

I'M BACK....Happy New Year! Many, many thanks to Steve Benen for filling in for the past week. His blogging has been great, and if you know what's good for you you'll bookmark his regular site and visit it daily. He blogs at The Carpetbagger Report (http://www.thecarpetbaggerreport.com).

Regular blogging will start up on Wednesday morning after I have a chance to catch up on the news. I understand that a new Congress will be in session shortly. Along with a new speaker? Nancy somebody, I think. I imagine that will be worth a blog post or three.

POSTSCRIPT: An emailer reminds me that since I was off for the past week, I didn't get a chance to gloat about USC's trouncing of the "We Deserve a Rematch" Michigan Wolverines in the Rose Bowl. I'm a little saddened that anyone thinks I'd gloat over such a thing, but I guess that's the world we live in. So let me just take this chance to extend my sincere condolences to Michigan fans around the country. I imagine things are pretty chilly in Ann Arbor right about now.

Kevin Drum 12:49 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (76)

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Comments

Hey Kevin,why would you gloat about the 2nd best team in L.A?

Posted by: gab on January 3, 2007 at 1:18 AM | PERMALINK

Ah, Kevin,

Welcome back. Steve did an outstanding job in your abscense.

BTW, don't be too surprised if egbert starts calling you Steve. His childish behavior has a way of exagerating the inane.

Posted by: bigcat on January 3, 2007 at 1:45 AM | PERMALINK

I imagine things are pretty chilly in Ann Arbor right about now.

If Ann Arbor is anything like Chicago at the moment, the temps there are a good 20 degrees above normal.

Posted by: Disputo on January 3, 2007 at 1:45 AM | PERMALINK

Let's hope this year is a little better than the last.

Posted by: Old Hat on January 3, 2007 at 1:45 AM | PERMALINK

It's the academics that we really focus on. Cough.

Posted by: ferd on January 3, 2007 at 1:47 AM | PERMALINK

Well, at least egbert and the Real Al never noticed.

Kudos to Steve Benen - Kept the flow of information going while fighting the attacks by the Incontinent Kenneth.

Too little too late - but, great 2nd half.

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 1:48 AM | PERMALINK

Welcome back, Kevin.

Posted by: Frequency Kenneth on January 3, 2007 at 2:01 AM | PERMALINK

Ah, Steve.

You just don't understand how fabulous Bush is.


-eghead

Posted by: craigie on January 3, 2007 at 2:18 AM | PERMALINK

Ah Steve,

No one is falling for your act. You can pretend ignorance and a lack of concern but we all know you're just giddy. I imagine you're looking forward to humiliating some god-fearing Republican congressman this week and crushing the OSU Beavers next fall.

Posted by: egbert on January 3, 2007 at 2:19 AM | PERMALINK

Thanks to the Trojans for showing up at least half of the sports pundits, those who took up Lloyd Carr's whining about the unfairness of it all. Now, if Florida will just come through . . .

Posted by: DevilDog on January 3, 2007 at 2:39 AM | PERMALINK

It's just too, too easy...

Posted by: craigie on January 3, 2007 at 2:58 AM | PERMALINK

I don't think it's gloating so much as it is a realization that normality has returned at least to some extent to the world. Michigan is losing in the Rose Bowl, USC is winning, UCLA is losing, and the Democrats control the congress. There are a few outliers (that Boise State thing and the guy in the White House), but returning the earth's spin to the correct axis is obviously going to take some time. Meanwhile, we have the traditional Michigan choke in Pasadena as a strong signal that normalcy is on its way back.

Posted by: Bob G on January 3, 2007 at 3:11 AM | PERMALINK

I saw the best college football game of all time the other night. Boise State's overtime win over Oklahoma was amazing. Two talented football teams playing their hearts out.

As to USC's win in the Rose Bowl--most teams do well at home. The Rose Bowl gives whatever Southern California team is playing it an almost impossible advantage. I wonder how USC would have faired at Ann Arbor. (The last paragraph was required to satisfy Dan, my associate and friend, and an insufferable Michigan grad.)

Welcome back Kevin. Steve did a great job. I am bookmarking the Carpetbagger Report.

Posted by: Ron Byers on January 3, 2007 at 4:41 AM | PERMALINK

Welcome back, Kevin. Steve kept us up to date on things. Hope you didnt do as mich driving as I did last week.

Posted by: troglodyte on January 3, 2007 at 5:37 AM | PERMALINK

On the note of winning.

I see Bush is already uncutting the new congress.

This from an Associated Press article in Forbes Magazine


Associated Press
Bush Seeks Cooperation From New Congress
Associated Press 01.03.07, 1:55 AM ET

President Bush pushed his signature agenda in a newspaper opinion piece Wednesday while asking Democrats, in charge of the House and Senate for the first time in his presidency, to work with him on legislation over the next two years.

Bush repeated his long-held policies on the war in Iraq, tax cuts, entrepreneurship and changes in Social Security and other entitlement programs in a guest column published in The Wall Street Journal. However, the policies came wrapped in an appeal for bipartisanship the day before Republicans turn over control of Congress to wary Democrats.

And he included a warning: "If the Congress chooses to pass bills that are simply political statements, they will have chosen stalemate," Bush wrote. "If a different approach is taken, the next two years can be fruitful ones for our nation. We can show the American people that Republicans and Democrats can come together to find ways to help make America a more secure, prosperous and hopeful society."

Bush is expected to announce this month a new direction for U.S. policy on Iraq. In the column, he gave no hint of change but cited as a priority his frequently stated goal of helping Iraq gain full control over its affairs.

"We now have the opportunity to build a bipartisan consensus to fight and win the war," he wrote.

This is WHY Dems needed to insist they have a mandate, voters clearly DID want a change, and Bush, at 31% has lost his mandate. Bush has only to do what Dems say, or impeachment must follow, end of story.

Posted by: Cheryl on January 3, 2007 at 5:42 AM | PERMALINK

Welcome back, I look forward to another year of pointing out your logical fallacies. Thanks for this comment section that allows those of us in the lonely minority to still have the opportunity to speak truth to power.

Posted by: minion on January 3, 2007 at 7:30 AM | PERMALINK

Kevin - Welcome back. We did have a good time with Steve last week. And congratulations to USC. They deserve kudos for their Rose Bowl performance. But let's talk turkey for just a moment. By now, everyone in the country is aware of the triumphant victory of the Boise State Broncos over the storied Oklahoma Sooners at the Fiesta Bowl on Monday night. This leaves Boise State as one of only two undefeated teams in the country. And so one must ask the question, if Ohio State should lose to Florida next week, should Boise State be declared the national champion? Now before you all go crazy over such a notion just consider that Boise State won every game on their schedule, including Oregon State, which was one of only two teams to beat Kevin's dear Trojans. BSU didn't just beat Oregon State, they skewered them. Finally, consider that this proposition is coming from a University of Idaho alum (me, Class of '77) and so I don't come to this conclusion easily. But can someone tell me why Boise State shouldn't make such a claim?

Good to have you back Kevin.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 8:16 AM | PERMALINK

Welcome back. The GOP spin machine is at it again. Here is what Pelosi actually requested in the Minority Bill of Rights:

The full text of the Minority Bill of Rights follows:

Here, the People Rule

A Minority Bill of Rights for the House of Representatives

June 23, 2004

"All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle: that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression."

--Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801.

The Constitution begins with the simple but revolutionary phrase "We the people," which announced to the world that here, the people rule. To speak for the people, the Constitution gives the greatest responsibility to the House of Representatives: Members are to be elected every two years, and no Member may be appointed to office.

Today in the House of Representatives, however, the voices of nearly half of the people have been silenced, and the marketplace of ideas has been effectively closed. Too often, incivility and the heavy hand of the majority have substituted for thoughtful debate.

Respectful of both the wishes of the Founders, and the expectations of the American people, we offer the following principles for restoring democracy in the "People’s House," guaranteeing that the voices of the people are heard.

I. Bipartisan Administration of the House

There should be regular consultations among the elected leaders of both parties to discuss scheduling, administration and operations of the House.

- The House should have a predictable, professional, family-friendly schedule that allows the legislative process to proceed in a manner that ensures timely and deliberate dispensation of the work of the Congress.

- Similar, regular meetings between Chairs and Ranking Members of committees, and staffs should be held.

- The minority should control at least one-third of committee budgets and office space.

II. Regular Order for Legislation

The legislative process in the House should return to a more regular democratic order at every level.

- Bills should be developed following full hearings, open subcommittee and committee markups, with appropriate referrals to other committees. Members should have at least 24 hours to examine a bill prior to consideration at the subcommittee level.

- Bills should generally come to the floor under a procedure that allows open, full, and fair debate consisting of a full amendment process that grants the minority the right to offer its alternatives, including a substitute.

- Members should have at least 24 hours to examine bill and conference report text prior to floor consideration. Rules governing floor debate must be reported before 10 p.m. for a bill to be considered the following day.

- Floor votes should be completed within 15 minutes, with the customary 2-minute extension to accommodate Members’ ability to get to the House Chamber to cast their vote. No vote shall be held open in order to manipulate the outcome.

- House-Senate conference committees should hold regular meetings (at least weekly) of all conference committee Members. All duly-appointed conferees shall be informed of the schedule of conference committee activities in a timely manner, and given ample opportunity for input and debate as decisions are made toward final bill language.

- The Suspension Calendar should be restricted to non-controversial legislation, with minority-authored legislation scheduled in relation to the party ratio in the House.

Posted by: bakho on January 3, 2007 at 8:27 AM | PERMALINK

The term "Arrogant Asses" was coined by an MSU coach, but a lot of UM people bought into it at once. You need to be in Ann Arbor on a game day to know the true pathos of a bunch of middle-aged middle managers and insurance agents in college gear trying to find their old hangout, or lining up at the Brown Jug.
The recent anti-affirmative action referendum was fronted by a young woman who had to suffer the horror of attending one of the UM branch campuses, rather than Ann Arbor, because she couldn't make the cut. She put it down to her race, but her chief grievance seemed to be that she lost out on all of that campus life--pledge pins? football tickets? binge drinking?--that she seems to think was her birthright.
A lot of us with UM diplomas would not mind at all some kind of diploma mill run in Ann Arbor--a UM-Light--to service all the drones who want the college football without the college.

Posted by: Steve paradis on January 3, 2007 at 8:58 AM | PERMALINK

Tough about the State of Michigan - Two burials within a week.

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 9:04 AM | PERMALINK

Regarding postscript: Ouch.

We got our asses kicked. It was hard to watch.

Posted by: aaron on January 3, 2007 at 9:15 AM | PERMALINK

Kevin:

I suppose I should be "excited" because Rutgers won some bowl or other, but since I've always considered "football" a metaphor for corporate hierarchy (not to mention, umm, slavery and indentured servitude) at its worst, let's just say that I couldn't give two shakes of a lamb's tail -- and that's putting it as gently as possible. Now imagine my frosty contempt for the rest of it.

As mentioned, Steve Benen did an excellent job in your absence.

And, of course, welcome back :)

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 9:16 AM | PERMALINK

"If Ann Arbor is anything like Chicago at the moment, the temps there are a good 20 degrees above normal."

I'm pretty sure it wasn't the temperature that Kevin was refering to. I was hoping that Mich. could pull out a victory (it wasn't so farfetched were they able to get to Booty a bit quicker) and one of the fruits of victory would have been to come to this thread and gloat. But I would never, I mean never, exhibit the type of concern troll, feining sympathy that Kevin did in his post.

(Alright, I would have, but Kevin is supposed to be above that sort of thing.)

Posted by: LowLife on January 3, 2007 at 9:17 AM | PERMALINK

KD, welcome back.

There was little news. Shouldn't take you long to catch up -- 20, 30 min, tops. Waiting for your 1st DFL congressional agenda thread.

Posted by: wishIwuz2 on January 3, 2007 at 9:34 AM | PERMALINK

It should be mentioned that any real gloating will be taking place in Columbus,Ohio.I know there aren't any palm trees and rock stars in the midwest but then again we're not bragging about winning a game for 3rd place.

Posted by: gandalf on January 3, 2007 at 9:46 AM | PERMALINK

An aside for the moment

The University of Louisville restored the dignity of the much maligned Big East - However, did anyone notice that either 21 or 24 Floridians grace their roster? - As to the power of states - Enough said.

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 10:04 AM | PERMALINK

Glad to see you're OK, Kevin. Not kidnapped or stranded on a mountain. Two silent days after USC crushes Michigan in the Rose Bowl?

Posted by: Jim Bartle on January 3, 2007 at 10:09 AM | PERMALINK

thethirdpaul - If Florida is so great then why did those players decide to leave? =)

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 10:10 AM | PERMALINK

Loved reading Steve in your absence! It was great to get fresh and insightful commentary during a period when a lot of other blogs were slacking off.

Posted by: Robert on January 3, 2007 at 10:19 AM | PERMALINK

Another lifeless effort from a cold weather team playing an LA team, at home, during the holidays, 6 weeks after their season ended. Ho hum.

This game only has meaning if the LA team loses.

Posted by: TT on January 3, 2007 at 10:30 AM | PERMALINK

lamonte,

Department of Corrections can only handle so many, er "noles, Gators, and 'canes can only take so many.

Posted by: stupid git on January 3, 2007 at 10:33 AM | PERMALINK

TT,

Probably too much prime rib at Lawry's - Wonder if they won that Bowl?

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 10:42 AM | PERMALINK

I have never heard an announcer more irritating than Brent Musburger.

He spent most of the game talking about the players' NFL prospects, and even called USC's incoming recruting class its "draft choices." Every downfield pass is a "strike," even a couple which turned out to be overthrown, and he hyperventilated over a brilliant USC TD catch, when every viewer could see the ball lying on the ground.

Plus, of course, his patented fawning over the coaches (also in college basketball).

Posted by: JIm Bartle on January 3, 2007 at 10:47 AM | PERMALINK

I grew up in Boise and went to my share of games played on the famous field of blue turf. Interesting, although I went to college out of state, I took a couple of classes one summer at BSU just for the helluva it. One was on Soviet film from World War II. I saw some great movies in the class, but the teacher was pretty much an unapologetic Stalinist. After listening to her babble on about how noble and misunderstood the USSR was (and believe me, I have enormous respect for the sacrifices the PEOPLE of that country made during the war), I challenged her on the deportation of the Chechens en masse to Siberia during the war. She and the classroom of dreamy sychophants took umbridge and she accused me "not thinking critically". This was coming from a woman who described how every time she crossed the border from West to East Germany, a population of frowning capitalists turned into a population of smiling socialists.

I'm still amazed to this day that this woman was teaching at all, let alone in Idaho.

Posted by: Chuck Darwin on January 3, 2007 at 10:49 AM | PERMALINK

I mean, who could have predicted USC planned to THROW the ball through the air and players would catch it?

Posted by: Jim Bartle on January 3, 2007 at 11:13 AM | PERMALINK

Chuck Darwin - At the University of Idaho I took Urban Sociology from a fascist (he admitted in class) and French from a British socialist who was active in the anti-war protests of the late 60's (before I arrived). It is sometimes surprising what you can find in Idaho. Now that I view the state of politics in Idaho from the other side of the country it looks pretty wierd to me. But a closer examination reveals some interesting diversity.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 11:22 AM | PERMALINK

i'm in ann arbor.

it's kind of warm. but its freakily abandoned cause i apparently missed the memo and came back a day earlier for winter term than everyone else. so i've had a lonely day to reflect on the loss...

Posted by: brian on January 3, 2007 at 11:27 AM | PERMALINK

lamonte:

An Urban Sociologist who self-described as a fascist? That is truly bizarre, considering that one of the underpinnings of fascism is a hatred of cosmopolitan diversity and a celebration of a supposed (and supposedly glorious) unitary culture.

It's like a guy who likes to build thatch-roofed mud huts from local materials getting a degree in architecture :)

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 11:29 AM | PERMALINK

rmck1 - Bob - I have a degree in architecture (and a license to practice) and I think building huts, or any other building, from natural materials is just fine.

Regarding the fascist urban sociologist - I just said it was interesting, not that it made sense!

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 11:33 AM | PERMALINK

Attention newly-elected members of Congress: Watch Your Backs

Posted by: cleek on January 3, 2007 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

Welcome back, Kevin. Cheryl mentioned it upthread, but one suggestion for your first blog post would be the op-ed piece that numbnuts Bush has in today's Wall St. Journal. This slimeball invokes 9-11 (again) to justify the invasion of Iraq, takes a swipe at Dems for earmarks (Byrd and Obey, in particular) and crows about cutting the budget deficit in half. Although half of horrendous is still horrible. Bush also suggests that Democrats work with him in a spirit of bipartisanship for "the good of the country". More like, to save his sorry, pimply ass from impeachment.

This is so clearly a Rovian tactic of preempting many of the Democratic initiatives, that it makes me want to vomit. The full article is over at www.rawstory.com. Your thoughts?

Posted by: The Conservative Deflator on January 3, 2007 at 11:40 AM | PERMALINK

lamonte:

Hehe ... well, so much for *that* example, huh (although seriously -- there's nothing puzzling about somebody trained in architecture cultivating an appreciation for all its forms; it'd be quite another, though, for a rough-hewn venacular builder to go study at the feet of Corvoisier and Mies van der Roche :)

Hitler famously went off on his anti-semitic kick in a big way when he settled in Vienna after WW1. The former capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was veritably teeming with Slavs, Jews and other refugees of the Great War. He hated hated *hated* all that polyglot cosmopolitianism ...

So a fascist would likely hate hate *hate* cities -- and then this guy gets a *degree* in them -- to teach?

Holy fact / value distinction, Batman !

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

Bob - to be totally honest the professor was an ex-policeman who suggested that in certain cities criminals felt safer with the police in force rather than citizens left alone with the police on strike (as apparently happended in his medium sized city while he was a cop) because the people without the police were a lot more scary for criminals than any police force on its own. He then said to us, "Didn't I tell you I was a fascist?" Admittedly, not quite the same as one educated in the art of facsism.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 12:00 PM | PERMALINK

Welcome back Kevin.............

Indiana Free Press - citizen journalism.......give a look see.........we all gotta keep the ball rolling!

here

Posted by: avahome on January 3, 2007 at 12:06 PM | PERMALINK

Aw Kevin, we hardly missed you.

At least egbert definitely didn't, since he started every comment by slamming you and your posts.

Posted by: Extradite Rumsfeld on January 3, 2007 at 12:09 PM | PERMALINK

So a fascist would likely hate hate *hate* cities -- and then this guy gets a *degree* in them -- to teach?

Fascism might certainly involve a degree of reaction to cosmopolitanism, but certainly its not inherently an anti-urban idealism. If anything, it seeks to maintain urbanized industrialism while eliminating the cosmopolitanism it sees as its consequence in less firmly managed societies.

Posted by: cmdicely on January 3, 2007 at 12:10 PM | PERMALINK

My hand is sore from repeatedly jerking off to the Saddam lynching video on YouTube.

Posted by: (fake) egbert on January 3, 2007 at 12:12 PM | PERMALINK

Welcome back, Kevin.

Please make a New Year's resolution to pay closer attention to global warming -- to follow the news about its rapid progression (much more often reported in the UK media than the US media); about its huge economic, social and national security implications; about efforts to deal with it; and about the efforts of the fossil fuel industry and their bought-and-paid-for politicians and media shills to prevent anything from being done to deal with it -- and to write about it often.

Global warming -- and not the fake, phony "war on terror" or the utterly bogus "clash of civilizations" with Islam -- will be the defining issue of the 21st century. Within a very few years, global warming and its effects will overwhelm all other issues facing humanity.

If you post as often about global warming as you do about sports in 2007, that would be a big improvement to your blog.

Posted by: SecularAnimist on January 3, 2007 at 12:17 PM | PERMALINK

A patriot, a humble man who served as president despite not seeking the office, has died. His body was returned to Michigan to be buried. All Kevin has to say about Michigan is they lost a football game.

Posted by: Al on January 3, 2007 at 12:24 PM | PERMALINK

cmdicely:

Well, I'd quibble with you here. Fascism is certainly not anti-modern (another one of the many reasons that "Islamofascism" doesn't parse, as radical Islam *is* ideologgically anti-modern, even as it accepts the appurtenances of modern technology to advance its agenda), but as we both seem to agree that fascism is anti-cosmopolitan, to that extent it inevitably rejects the modern city for an idealized vision of a more balanced form of development that was nourished by the volkisch virtues of the countryside. Fascism, at least in Germany, grew out at least in part from Liebensreform, a kind of German New Age movement that contained a critique of crass industrial development (by both Bismarckian fiat and unreglated capitalism) that maps onto some of the ideas of a contemporary critic of urbanism like William Howard Kunstler. German Fascism was in an important way a reaction to the Second Reich's hurling itself headfirst into the industrial age.

lamonte:

That's very interesting, because what your teacher expressed is actually the antithesis of fascism -- but rather an article of Libertarian faith. Doubtless your teacher was being ironic, ripping on a college student's preconception that an ex-cop would naturally be a "fascist." It's funny, but a poster here, Sebastian, though otherwise a good liberal, is a pro-gun ideologue. And he adores this hobbyhorse, too: The People taking their own self-defense into their hands and not relying on the police would inevitably reduce crime.

Agree or disagree with that -- but fascism is statism, and would certainly support the police over armed citizens. Sebastian loves to remind us of how one of Hitler's first agenda items was to confiscate privately-owned firearms.

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 12:30 PM | PERMALINK

Al:

For perhaps the first time ever, I agree with you.

A few words in homage to the late Gerald Ford might be appropriate.

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 12:32 PM | PERMALINK

Happy New Year, Kevin!

And yes, congrats to the Trojans. They wanted it more. Damn Wolverines.

I'll have to save up all my GET BOOTY posts to you for next year.

So who you pulling for tonight? Notre Dame or LSU?

GEAUX TIGERS

Posted by: san antone rose on January 3, 2007 at 12:43 PM | PERMALINK

rmck1 - To clarify, I think what my professor was stating was society (and even the criminal element) was better off with the police in charge than with the citizens to fend for themselves when it came to interpreting right and wrong. And I guess although that is exactly the arrangment we live under (the former), excessive and limitless power of the police (state) would be fascism while limited and regulated power of the police would be democracy. Is that your understanding? It makes sense to me.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 12:44 PM | PERMALINK

A few words in homage to the late Gerald Ford might be appropriate.

Bob
Posted by: rmck1

The big Nissan dealership on the Evangeline Thruway has its VAST American flag at half mast. Make of that what you will.

Hey, half of Lafayette's wearin' Purple and Gold (and Carnival season doesn't start until 12th Night)so for this game I guess I gotta go for Da Bayou Bengals or risk gettin' run outta town on a rail.

Posted by: MsNThrope on January 3, 2007 at 12:47 PM | PERMALINK

lamonte:

Oh, okay -- I misinterpreted. Your prof was making a point about vigilante justice which might sound "fascist" as it reflexively supports the police over the people taking the law into their own hands. On this, I'd tend to agree with him (and certainly don't conflate that view with "fascism.")

As for your understanding of facism vs democracy regarding the place of police power -- agreed, absolutely.

In a democracy, the police -- like all arms of the state -- are ultimately accountable to the people.

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

one suggestion for your first blog post would be the op-ed piece that numbnuts Bush has in today's Wall St. Journal. This slimeball invokes 9-11 (again) to justify the invasion of Iraq, takes a swipe at Dems for earmarks (Byrd and Obey, in particular) and crows about cutting the budget deficit in half. Although half of horrendous is still horrible. Bush also suggests that Democrats work with him in a spirit of bipartisanship for "the good of the country".

Well, we were attack on 9/11, we haven't been attacked since, the Democrat party is rather well known for its own "earmarks" and "pork spending" (sorry, son, I lived through the 70s and 80s) and the budget deficit has been cut in half.

I doubt whether Mr. Drum will write anything glowing about the administration, particularly since fifty of you loony kooks will call for his head and denounce him for it, but might I suggest my own idea:

When do the Democrats surrender to al Qaeda and who gets to stand on the dais and hand Osama bin Laden the Constitution so he can tear it up before the world?

Posted by: Norman Rogers on January 3, 2007 at 1:03 PM | PERMALINK

Here's my homage to Gerald Ford.

Burn in hell next to Saddam Hussein, Fascist!

Thanks a lot for letting Nixon and his henchmen off the hook! Thanks for denying these evil men the Justice they deserved. You did America a disservice that continues to cripple this once-great nation, 30 years later!

Then, you continued that policy of craven weaselness, when it was possible you may have made a difference, and saved thousands of lives, by keeping your criticism of Bush to yourself.

Good riddance.

Posted by: Extradite Rumsfeld on January 3, 2007 at 1:07 PM | PERMALINK

Ron Byers: I saw the best college football game of all time the other night.

No, no, Harvard-Yale 1968. Going in, Yale had a 16-game winning streak with Brian Dowling as its quarterback (the model for Doonesbury's BD; he hadn't lost a game he started since the 6th grade), and Harvard was down 16 points with 42 seconds left. Harvard got the 16 points to win 29-29.

Posted by: anandine on January 3, 2007 at 1:13 PM | PERMALINK

Norman Rogers - in the days following 9/11 the country was 90% behind the president. Even Al Gore, who had been robbed of the presidency by Bush and his band of thieves at the Supreme Court, said "George Bush is my President." We gladly followed him into Afghanistan with the assumption that he was trying to get the mastermind mind of 9/11. It was Bush, not the Democrats, who switched gears and unnecessarily got us into the mess called Iraq. It was Bush, not the Democrats, who tore up the Constitution when it came to domestic spying, due process, and human rights and it was Bush, not the Democrats who destroyed any inkling of credibility we had with the rest of the world community. Democrats surrender to Al Qaeda!? Bush did that years ago when he launched this country into a fit of ill conceived paranoia.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 1:15 PM | PERMALINK

...who gets to stand on the dais and hand Osama bin Laden the Constitution so he can tear it up.

Wake up Normie, W already shredded it for him.

Posted by: ckelly on January 3, 2007 at 1:30 PM | PERMALINK

Oh, do Fight Fiercely, HAH-Vard, Fight, Fight, Fight - Beat those beastly Elis

Interesting the Ivy League - if you are the last team to tie your opponent, such as the afore mentioned 29-29 game, you win. How utterly sporting.

With even more apologies to Tom Lehrer.

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 1:53 PM | PERMALINK

Norman:

About the same time we get to watch you running naked through the public square, dripping with oleagenous chicken feathers :)

Bob

Posted by: rmck1 on January 3, 2007 at 1:59 PM | PERMALINK

Norman is Cornel Wilde?

Posted by: stupid git on January 3, 2007 at 2:05 PM | PERMALINK

With even more apologies to Tom Lehrer.
Posted by: thethirdPaul

"Impress us with your prowess, do!"


The budget deficit has certainly not 'been cut in half' - you keep ignoring the borrowing from the SS Trust fund.

'All the news reports on the new deficit projections from the Congressional Budget Office that I saw avoided any mention of the money borrowed from Social Security. For example, the deficit now projected for 2006 was reported as $260 billion. The projected on-budget deficit, which is right there for anyone to see, is $437 billion. If you don’t think that we should be using the Social Security surplus to hide the true size of the deficit, then this is the number that you care about.' - Dean Baker

Posted by: MsNThrope on January 3, 2007 at 2:12 PM | PERMALINK

lamont:

Democrats surrender to Al Qaeda!? Bush did that years ago when he launched this country into a fit of ill conceived paranoia.

No, he's been killing them, sometimes by the hundreds.

Now, go run off and see what Fred Sandford has for you in his little junkyard.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on January 3, 2007 at 2:52 PM | PERMALINK

A new congress?

That's right. And not a moment too soon. Time for congress to make progress both nationally and internationally. Time for congress to address real problems that have straight forward ambitions. Time for congress to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goals and global poverty reduction. By simply adding an additional annual funding amount of $19 billion, the US could help to cut global poverty in half by 2015. And bring an end to global poverty by 2025 according to The Borgen Project. It's time for legislative action supporting the most important humanitarian issue of this generation.

Posted by: seattle on January 3, 2007 at 2:56 PM | PERMALINK

Yeah, like not ordering the 10th Mountain to seal the passes into Pakistan -

And creating a vast On The Job Training and Recruiting site in Iraq for them.

It is lamonte - However, the Lamont, I envision is more of the Lamont Cranston, otherwise known as The Shadow - "Who knows the evil which lurks in the hearts of men, the Shadow do, er does or whatever"

Posted by: thethirdPaul on January 3, 2007 at 3:00 PM | PERMALINK

Norman - You're wrong again. It isn't Bush that's been killing anybody. He had that opportunity 40 years ago and hid behind his family's apron. Now he just sends other people's children to fight and die for his convoluted causes.

If you decide, as you have, that your only means of debate is to make fun of someone's name the least you could do is spell it right. And by the way, Fred Sanford had more wisdom in his little finger than you could hope for in your inflated Princeton head.

Posted by: lamonte on January 3, 2007 at 3:06 PM | PERMALINK

Go Chargers!
I'm a SoCal guy, but I can't cheer for USC - reminds me of OJ and the Nixon inner circle, while Michigan is progressive and spawned the SDS.
The cultural anchors favor Michigan.

Posted by: Richard W. Crews on January 3, 2007 at 3:16 PM | PERMALINK

Go Bruins!

Posted by: greenjeans on January 3, 2007 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

thethirdPaul: Interesting the Ivy League - if you are the last team to tie your opponent, such as the afore mentioned 29-29 game, you win. How utterly sporting.

That was the headline in the Crimson the next day: Harvard Wins 29-29. After all, 16 points in 42 seconds? That counts as a real comeback.

Posted by: anandine on January 3, 2007 at 5:11 PM | PERMALINK

"....and if you know what's good for you" - Kevin


The liberals are at it again. Trying to tell me what's is best.

BOISE STATE!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Jay on January 3, 2007 at 5:37 PM | PERMALINK

Speaking as a diehard Wolverine fan: we weren't so much out-played as simply out-coached. And yes, it was brutally hard to watch.

But there's always next year ;)

Posted by: Anarch on January 3, 2007 at 7:13 PM | PERMALINK

It was an awesome game. As was the victory by Boise State. It was a wonderful weekend of football.

Posted by: consider wisely always on January 3, 2007 at 7:34 PM | PERMALINK

Egbert at 2:19am was a FAKE!!!

Posted by: egbert on January 3, 2007 at 9:15 PM | PERMALINK

Great game for the Trojans - awesome second half when they decided to throw the ball. Don't know which was a more satisfying sight- the expression of Michigan coach Carr on the sidelines when the wheels were coming off his team or the face of Oklahoma coach Stoops when Boise State scored the winning 2-point conversion. Actually the best sight was the the USC Song Girls in their Rose Bowl outfits!

Posted by: oofda on January 6, 2007 at 9:45 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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