Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for Free News & Updates

November 11, 2007
By: Kevin Drum

GO HOME....Who says America has lost its power to influence the rest of the world?

The Japanese government has created new immigration procedures for foreign visitors — rules that critics say are all too revealing about official attitudes toward foreigners.

On Nov. 20, Japan will begin fingerprinting and photographing non-Japanese travelers as they pass through immigration at air and sea ports. The government says the controls are a necessary security measure aimed at preventing a terrorist attack in Japan.

The new system is modeled on the U.S. program instituted in 2004 that takes digital photos and fingerprints of travelers entering the United States on visas. But the Japanese system goes further by requiring foreign residents — in addition to visitors — to be photographed and fingerprinted.

I wonder if the ongoing arms race to treat every tourist like a potential terrorist is the 21st century version of Smoot-Hawley?

Kevin Drum 11:54 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (39)

Bookmark and Share
 
Comments

Someone remind me that all these police state measures are designed to protect our freedoms. (Of course in this instance it is Japan emulating the good old USA).

I had a recent experience taking the Cape May-Lewes Ferry as a walkon passenger. Walk on passengers had to pass through a metal detector while the cars, RVs and tractor trailers drove right on the ferry! I sure felt safer!

Posted by: RickG on November 11, 2007 at 12:10 PM | PERMALINK

I wonder if this sort of extra security will start to limit business travel as well as tourism. On one hand, people on business sometimes have to travel but could do things to limit the number of times they do travel to one country. Tourists don't have to travel but may be willing to put up with this to travel to a country once.

Posted by: CarlP on November 11, 2007 at 12:10 PM | PERMALINK

NICE TAKEDOWN of Wolfie (NOW, LISTEN TO THIS) Blitzer by Holbrook just happened on CNN...as usual with our illustrious paid for anchor/pundit/opinion folk in the MSM Wolfie didn't listen to the answer Holbrook had just provided him and turned around to ask him the very same thing he'd commented on (going for that GOTCHA moment as he regularly does)...so in language far too subtle for the likes of Blitzer, Matthews, and Russert to take in he slapped him down...You go Ambassador!!!

Posted by: Dancer on November 11, 2007 at 12:11 PM | PERMALINK

Must keep the spirit of Busheido pure - As pure as those bayonets of Nanking and the appendages of those mighty warriors visiting the brothels in Korea.

It took less than 30 years for the Japanese military to change from one of civil conduct against foes in the '05 war against Russia and foreign troops to the Rape of Nanking. Change can come rapidly to a lurking spirit of Busheido and Nationalism.

And remembrance to all veterans, living, dead and/or maimed and wounded on this Remembrance Day in Canada and Veteran's Day/Armistice Day here. Rest thee well.

Posted by: bert on November 11, 2007 at 12:13 PM | PERMALINK

Freedom doesn't mean much if you're dead. Generally, constitutional rights do not extend to non-citizens let alone foreigners who aren't resident aliens. Even liberals agreed that foreigners who are not aliens and citizens do not have constitutional rights during the FISA debate on whether or not to support Bush's Terrorist Surveillance Program. Are liberals now even backtracking on that so that terrorists have the same rights as citizens?
Also, how do we know the executive branch doesn't have classified information saying there's a terrorist threat, and that's why they need to make doubly sure terrorists aren't sneaking in through the borders? The most important job of the unitary executive is to protect its citizens and that's what it's doing.

Posted by: Al on November 11, 2007 at 12:27 PM | PERMALINK

just for the record, if off topic, it's amusing how everyone including kevin has accepted the meme 'smoot-hawley caused/extended/deepened the great depression.'

This patently untrue notion was originally concocted and pushed on the WSJ editorial page by that world-class crakpot Jude Wanniski, promoter of other hits like supply side economics and the Laffer curve (see Jonathan Chait).

The smoot-hawley nonsense has been thoroughly debunked and dismissed by economists across the spectrum yet is accepted as received wisdom, and actively promoted by the economically uninformed, WSJ editorialists, the RNC and other obscurantists.

Posted by: cwe on November 11, 2007 at 12:33 PM | PERMALINK

CarlP: I wonder if this sort of extra security will start to limit business travel as well as tourism.

Speaking as someone who has done a lot of international business travel, I don't think so. A photo and fingerprints are not particularly burdensome, compared to a visa. Getting a visa can require a special trip to an Embassy, at a time when it's open, and coping with whatever lines and wait there may be. OTOH fingerprints are done rapidly, and without ink, using modern technology. Photos are also rapid. In fact, photos are sometimes required when visiting office buildings.

In short, some of you are making a mountain out of a molehill.

Posted by: ex-liberal on November 11, 2007 at 12:35 PM | PERMALINK

al: Freedom doesn't mean much if you're dead.


freedom doesn't mean much if you aren't scared of every possible thing regardless of its likelyhood..


The Odds of Dying:

Heart Disease: 1-in-5

Cancer: 1-in-7

Car Accident: 1-in-100

Assault by Firearm: 1-in-299

Lightning: 1-in-55,928

Terror Attack: 1-in-88000

Posted by: mr. irony on November 11, 2007 at 12:43 PM | PERMALINK

Since the United States wrote Japan's constitution after WWII and they are really nothing more than a puppet government of the United States, it really isn't surprising that they would mirror our descent into fascism. They were already pretty much there under Tojo, so this is not what I would call a startling development. The Japanese ant farm society is not a place I ever want to visit or live in, in any case.

19 men with $1.98 boxcutters have certainly given fascists around the world the green light to take away people's freedoms, haven't they? What a sad friggin' joke....

Posted by: The Conservative Deflator on November 11, 2007 at 12:47 PM | PERMALINK

Another giant leap toward Republican Nirvana.

If you ask a Republican (I have!), they will say this is a terrible thing and bad for the world. And (I assume) as soon as they turn away, they can't rip the massive grin off their faces!

Posted by: Mark-NC on November 11, 2007 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

We're number one! We're number one!

Posted by: craigie on November 11, 2007 at 1:11 PM | PERMALINK

"Freedom doesn't mean much if you're dead."

"In short, some of you are making a mountain out of a molehill."

Amazing how a little fearmongering can get people straight onto the slippery slope.

Posted by: craigie on November 11, 2007 at 1:14 PM | PERMALINK

*

Posted by: mhr on November 11, 2007 at 1:29 PM | PERMALINK

Charlie didn't like it, but I did a piece once with a lede that argued that just as the struggle of liberty against totalitarianism defined most of the 20th century, the struggle for citizenship with the movement of people across national borders would define the 20th century. My idea was that WEB Dubois was right -- the argument of the 20th century was always the color line, except that it was expressed in political terms by the pure racism of fascist Germany, and the con of Communism.

But now, it's the choice between the German model for "immigration" -- guest workers -- and the Ellis Island model, the direct connection between getting here and belonging here that literally made us America. Japan has always had the German model: Turks in Germany, Chinese and Koreans in Japan, Filipinos in Kuwait, etc. There has NEVER been a guest worker program that has ever worked -- so no wonder Japan regards travellers with suspicion. (Like so much as changed since Sekigahara?)

I remember a conversation I had once with a walking oxymoron, a Japanese immigration official. We talked about, among other things, the system you posted on, but we went on to debate the Ellis Island model, particularly Americanization, the process by which they become us, and who we are, changes and expands to include them. I could see that he simply didn't get it.

So I decided to be provocative, and I told him that Americanization was for Americans, the equivalent of "kokutai" for the Japanese. That woke him up -- cuz kokutai (which is usually translated as "the national essence", but could just as well be "Japan, Incorporated") is an extremely potent term in Japanese history. When soldiers charged yelling "Banzai!", that just meant that the Emperor should live 10,000 years. But the concept they were dying FOR, was "kokutai". (He was actually sorta alarmed I mentioned it.)

After all, I couldn't go to Japan and become Japanese, anymore than I could climb a tree and become a pine cone. But for Americans, the Ellis Island model is a living engine of what we are as a nation, and who we become, as a people.

So I asked him what he thought. He took a moment, and then he said: "Americanization is just a way to get rid of immigrants."

I was flabbergasted -- one of those moments when you understand every word somebody says, but it makes no sense. He finally explained that when a foreigner becomes an American, they're no longer a foreigner, AND, therefore, they're not an immigrant any more. (sic) I even used the example of the then-Secretary of state (Albright), or the chairman of the Joint Chiefs (Shalikashvili), both born foreigners.

So I tried to tell him that, for Americans, the idea that anybody can come from anywhere, so long as it is within the law ( which means generally invited BY an American -- a citizen, legal immigrant, or an employer: it's not about what's good for would-be immigrants, but what AMERICANS want), an immigrant who becomes a US citizen is just as American as those of us born here: THAT is our 'national essence'.

Maybe this guy's view is more influential than mine.

The more we talk about immigration in terms of economics, as if these are just factors of production and not people; or in terms of international trade and travellers, instead of families; the more we talk about temporary and not permanent, the more we define immigration law AS IF it is only about those who break it -- the more we get away from literally the essence of America.

I'm all for security checks and enforcement, etc. If we can't say "no" effectively, our "yes" becomes meaningless.

But we can do better'n this.


Posted by: theAmericanist on November 11, 2007 at 1:37 PM | PERMALINK

I can't let mhr's slur stand: the security systems that were most likely to have CAUGHT the 9-11 terrorists were proposed in 1994 by the late Barbara Jordan, who was as liberal as you get.

The Bush administration derailed their implementation after taking office in January 2001, appointing one of Jordan's chief opponents to be director of policy at the old INS : "Borderline Insanity", Washington Monthly, 2002. As somebody said in the article, whatever you think of the war on drugs, you wouldn't put somebody who wanted to legalize heroin in charge at the DEA -- but that's what BUSH did at the INS.

You're full of shit, mhr.

Posted by: theAmericanist on November 11, 2007 at 1:41 PM | PERMALINK

Gosh, why don't they just stick one of those GPS anklets on everyone entering the country? Then they can know where all the damn foreigners are all the damn time.

Posted by: josef on November 11, 2007 at 1:50 PM | PERMALINK

This doesn't seem at all out of character for the Japanese. And they may be trying to push this off on being "modeled after the U.S." but the idea that foreigners aren't welcome goes much deeper. The mayor of Tokyo has been an outspoken critic of foreigners in Japan. And has repeatedly (along with the media) blamed foreigners on a rise in crime (it doesn't help when U.S. soldiers go raping their women, of course). Even their own minister of immigration is decidedly anti-immigration. He has said quite emphatically that Japan will counter its declining population not with immigrants, but with robotics. The system of trust and honorifics in Japan is based on everyone being of the same ethnic group.

Even those that are able to immigrate there (Filipino brides are quite popular with older businessmen). Still have visas that are directly tied to their continued marriage. This is a problem in that foreign brides have been abused and yet can't divorce their husbands or they would have to return to their native countries. Places they may not have been for years.

I don't necessarily think this is right, but it's not at all out of character. Japan (like the U.S. South) is still fighting the rest of the world. Shamed from having lost and become a "little America". They will do what they can to at least win at home.

And yet, cars have to be built. So manufacturing is roboticized. Or moved to China and the U.S. Even the care of the elderly is increasingly done through robotics.

There is a sense that the purity not of race, but of culture, would be lost if foreigners would enter. The empathetic nature of the Japanese experience.

Remember, Japan went to China to find more land for its citizens in part because it was barred from immigrating to the U.S. and Europe. And, rightly so perhaps, they felt that if the West was to prevent them from moving there, they should let them at least control the East.

Posted by: Inaudible Nonsense on November 11, 2007 at 1:51 PM | PERMALINK
Freedom doesn't mean much if you're dead.

Life isn't worth much unless you're free.

Posted by: Duncan Kinder on November 11, 2007 at 1:52 PM | PERMALINK

If the concern here is the loss of privacy, that battle has been lost. In major cities now, you can hardly enter a large building (including hospitals) without photo ID. And often they take your picture too, and give you a nametag with that picture you have to wear while in the building. Every time you drive by a toll booth without stopping (paying the toll electronically) your location at that time is recorded in a database. Millions of video machines record the license plate of your car at intersections in many cities, and your face in building lobbies, stores, elevators, etc. And biological identification methods are the next big thing -- on your computer, at the ATM, your place of work, etc. Soon, everything you do and every movement you make will be recorded on some computer or imaging device.

In view of the above, it seems that worrying about photographing and finger-printing foreign visitors is no longer a major issue in today's world. (Making visas intentionally hard to get with long wait times and lines is another matter).

It's not a question of liking the loss of privacy as accepting that it is a fact of the modern world. And if you ever become the victim of a mugger, or of identity fraud, or other similar crime, you might feel that there are not enough of these controls in place.

Posted by: JS on November 11, 2007 at 3:24 PM | PERMALINK

Inaudible Nonsense: Remember, Japan went to China to find more land for its citizens in part because it was barred from immigrating to the U.S. and Europe. And, rightly so perhaps, they felt that if the West was to prevent them from moving there, they should let them at least control the East.

That's some amazingly apologist history. So without the Immigration Act of 1924 Japan wouldn't have invaded China, allied itself with Nazi Germany or started WWII in the Pacific? And "rightly so perhaps"?

Posted by: alex on November 11, 2007 at 4:19 PM | PERMALINK

So Kevin.

Are you going to suggest a set of metrics by which the effect of this policy can be evaluated? Something more than a general unease?

Perhaps you will write another post on this in a year or so, one examing the effect this policy has had?

I expect that both policies, the Japanese one and the American one, will have little impact and be of little worth.

Posted by: Adam on November 11, 2007 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

Generally, constitutional rights do not extend to non-citizens let alone foreigners who aren't resident aliens.

Sorry Al, the Bill of Rights is for everyone, not just knuckleheads like yourself.

Posted by: tomeck on November 11, 2007 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

"The new system is modeled on the U.S. program instituted in 2004 that takes digital photos and fingerprints of travelers entering the United States on visas."

But hasn't this program been halted for lack of funds and the fact that it was not really working? What was it called again - I can't remember.

Posted by: Anthony on November 11, 2007 at 4:27 PM | PERMALINK

JS: If the concern here is the loss of privacy, that battle has been lost. In major cities now, you can hardly enter a large building (including hospitals) without photo ID.

Right. Furthermore, there never was privacy when visiting another country. As a visitor, I fill out a landing card and a customs declaration, which I presume are retained. The immigration official runs my passport through a scanner, which I presume keeps a record of my visit.

Adding fingerprints and photo can only help me. These identifiers might thwart someone who stole my passport. The only objection is the inconvenience. And, as I said, I don't believe these steps are terribly inconvenient.

Posted by: ex-liberal on November 11, 2007 at 4:50 PM | PERMALINK

But the Japanese system goes further by requiring foreign residents — in addition to visitors — to be photographed and fingerprinted.

Umm, I'm a bit confused, how could someone be foreign resident without first being a foreign visitor? If they were born here, they'd automatically be a citizen.

I was photographed and fingerprinted when I got a driver's license, why is it an indignity for a guest to our country to go through the same (painless and quick) procedure?

Posted by: beowulf on November 11, 2007 at 5:10 PM | PERMALINK

The problems show up everywhere....at our institution of higher education, calls for papers for a fall, 2008 forum have to go out months earlier because foreign presenters whose papers are accepted are going to take longer to get US visa clearances to attend.

Posted by: academic on November 11, 2007 at 5:36 PM | PERMALINK

Am I the only one who remembers that it was Japanese terrorists who released nerve gas in a Japanese subway?

Posted by: serial catowner on November 11, 2007 at 5:37 PM | PERMALINK

The new system is modeled on the U.S. program instituted in 2004 that takes digital photos and fingerprints of travelers entering the United States on visas. But the Japanese system goes further by requiring foreign residents — in addition to visitors — to be photographed and fingerprinted.

As onerous as this may seem, it's actually a revision to the policy that had been in effect for decades and only changed in the early '90s, as I recall.

When I first working in Japan from 1987-90, I had to carry my Gaijin Taroku-sho at all times ("Your papers, pleaz."). This contained my photo, finger prints, and visa status. I was supposed to surrender it at Naria when I my work visa expired and I returned to the U.S. I kept mine as a "souvenir." This was no longer used when I worked in Japan in the mid-'90s and, because I am married to a Japanese national, I didn't even need a work visa. I'm not sure what is required for today to secure a work visa.

I always thought the "gaijin cards" were a pretty good idea. In fact, one could argue that if the U.S. kept as close of tabs on it's resident foreigners as the Japanese once did and are doing again, that the 9/11 attacks may never have happened.

While the U.S. and the world have undoubtedly benefited from our mostly open admissions policies for universities and technical schools, it's doubtful that the legacy of this system would have been dramatically different with more rigorous background checks than had been in affect prior to 2001.

Posted by: JeffII on November 11, 2007 at 5:42 PM | PERMALINK

Am I the only one who remembers that it was Japanese terrorists who released nerve gas in a Japanese subway? Posted by: serial catowner

Yes. Because they weren't terrorists with anything approaching a coherent political agenda. They were, are "religious" extremists. Aum Shinrikyo more resembles the Mason family than Islamists.

Posted by: JeffII on November 11, 2007 at 5:58 PM | PERMALINK

Brazil did this for a while. I got fingerprinted and photographed when I went in 9/04, but I went back again in 1/05 and they had stopped it.

Posted by: Randy Paul on November 11, 2007 at 6:18 PM | PERMALINK

the Japanese ant farm society is not a place I ever want to visit or live in, in any case.

Crikey, CD, and your commentary is usually spot on... but I guess it reminds me of the time long ago when I didn't see the diversity here.

Beowulf, it's not to be fingerprinted and scanned once but every time we reenter the country...

For what it's worth, the immigration officials I've politely bitched to about the coming system have all seemed quite embarrassed about the new procedures and end up with, "Well the U.S. does this." My reply, "Canada doesn't."

serial catowner, also the terror act in Tel Aviv airport and others.

Finally, Japan residents of South and North Korean and Chinese origins are exempted from the procedures because they're numerous enough and have the overseas allies to cause a political fuss.

Posted by: snicker-snack on November 11, 2007 at 7:18 PM | PERMALINK

I'm pretty sure that Japan instituted this more because they wanted to than for any other reason. The American decision to do these things was little more than a convenient pretext for the Japanese government to re-implement a controversial policy. It's kind of like Rush Limbaugh deciding that it's OK to chant "Obama the Magic Negro!" endlessly because LA Times columnist David Ehrenstein used it once in print; all that was needed was some authoritative figure to point to as a validating example. "See? They're doing it, so I can too."

Xenophobia is still strong here, with foreigners strongly distrusted--not for any actual danger or threat they pose, but for the perceived danger and threat. Crime rates among the immigrant population are even lower than among native Japanese (which is pretty low, or at least officially). However, the reverse is believed because immigration crimes (which Japanese natives, by definition, are unable to commit) are added to the count in official reports, along with a peppering of scare stories about rape and murder by foreigners... and voilà, you have the archetypal scary foreigner. The governor of the prefecture where I live (nationalist Shintaro Ishihara, here in Tokyo), loves doing that.

They stopped fingerprinting for Alien Registration some years ago because it offended Japan-born Koreans. There is a sizable Korean community in Japan that maintains its Korean nationality, despite the members of that community living their whole lives in Japan, with no intent of returning. Japan is their native country, and by physical features and speech they are usually indistinguishable from native Japanese. They refuse to accept citizenship, however, because of historical reasons associated with how they were brought to Japan, and how Koreans regard Japan in general. An interesting social phenomenon. There is some sensitivity to them here because of the noise they make when they are treated differently.

That, by the way, is reflected in the new immigration procedures: Korean permanent residents who are from that Japan-born population will be exempt.

As for me, I don't really mind too much the whole fingerprinting and photo-taking thing. There is the slight worry that some snafu might occur and I might be tied to some terrorist somewhere, but frankly, that could have happened under the old system with just names, signatures, and numbers.

What really annoys me is that my wait at the immigration line at Narita will now be a lot longer. Before now, as a visa holder, I could enter via the "Japan residents" line--a lot faster. Now, I will have to come back through the "Non-Japanese" line, which is always slower, and will likely be slower still because of the extra time to do the "security" procedures.

By the way: JeffII claims that the Alien Registration Card ("Gaikokujin Toroku-sho") was "no longer used" since the 90's. Untrue. The Gaijin Card never went away; I have one now. It just got changed from a small booklet (always a pain to carry, as it could not fit in a wallet) to an ID card. It is still required today, even if you get married, even if you become a permanent resident. If the police stop you and note that you are not carrying it, you could get into trouble (that happened to me once less than ten years ago). The main difference between the 80's and nowadays is that the police will stop foreigners a lot less often for plain old "Gaijin Card" checks.

Posted by: BlogD on November 11, 2007 at 8:27 PM | PERMALINK

ex-liberal (lying through his keyboard :In short, some of you are making a mountain out of a molehill.

From the Sacramento Bee:In 2000, the state had 6.4 million overseas visitors; in 2006, 4.6 million. In that same period, San Francisco saw a drop in overseas visitors of 30 percent; Los Angeles, 29 percent.

...three major issues:

1)Slow action on visas.

2) Terrible experiences entering the country (in surveys, travelers say the United States has the worst entry process in the world.)

3) The perception that visitors aren't welcome.

Of course, given what the GwB has done to the currency, tourism should be up next year. Quite a number of people we met at Newmarket talked about coming to Las Vegas.

Posted by: TJM on November 11, 2007 at 9:55 PM | PERMALINK

As pointed out above, Japan has always had a pained history with foreigners, so this might not be much of an apples-to-apples comparison... still, it stinks, and as a foreign resident in Japan I'm not looking forward to the longer waits at all.

Posted by: mike on November 12, 2007 at 5:13 AM | PERMALINK

It is still required today, even if you get married, even if you become a permanent resident.
Posted by: BlogD

I don't know what to say, BlogD. I was working in Tokyo from 1995-1998 and never had a card. I even had an "experience" with the kaisatsu one evening requiring a visit to the Roppongi station, and was never asked for a card, passport or anything else. They just needed my name, address and phone number and a promise from my wife that I'd be a good boy from now on.

Permanent residency is a different issue of course.

Posted by: JeffII on November 12, 2007 at 10:21 AM | PERMALINK

Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!

http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/henry.htm

What a wanker that Patrick Henry was. It's too bad the colonists listened to him. A lot of those fools died. What good was freedom to them after they were dead?

Posted by: cowalker on November 12, 2007 at 11:52 AM | PERMALINK

JeffII:

How did you avoid getting a card? (the card replaced the booklet sometime in the late 1980s[?]) when I moved from Yokohama to Tokyo in the early 1990s, I had to go to the ku-yakusho and inform them of my change of address, which was noted on the back of my card. My best friend in Japan, who has lived there for almost 25 years and is married to a Japanese woman, has to carry a card, and I don't think that would change even if he were granted permanent resident status. (BTW, that's "torokusho" and "keisatsu", not "tarokusho" and "kaisatsu," unless you were somehow stopped by the ticket wicket in Roppongi).

As for Aum Shinrikyo, which killed some people in a sarin gas accident (?) in Yamanashi a couple of years before the subway attacks, the media and the government had no problem labelling them "terrorists" regardless of the coherence of their ideology. The same was true of the people who carried out the most notable terrorist acts in Japan before that -- the Chukaku-ha -- which bombed railways around the country to protest the privatization of the Japan Railways, and did the same earlier to protest the building of the shinkansen.

Pretty much all the terrorist activity in Japan has been of the home-grown variety, and the new measures would do nothing to stop it.

Posted by: keith on November 13, 2007 at 10:00 AM | PERMALINK

BlogD:

The issue for Korean residents of Japan is not so much that they "maintain Korean nationality." Until 1945, Koreans and Taiwanese were legally Japanese, since Korea and were Japanese colonies. Koreans who lived in the Japanese home islands, whether by choice or not, were second-class citizens, but they were still citizens.

However, when the U.S. "freed" those Korean residents during the allied occupation of Japan, they simultaneously deprived them of their Japanese citizenship, meaning that even those who had been born in Japan and who spoke no other language than Japanese were suddenly "foreign residents" who needed to register with the authorities every year. Oh Sadaharu had to keep his booklet with him when he played at Koshien and during his years with the Yomiuri Giants.

By the 1980s, Korean residents who had been told for decades by the Japanese government that they were "not really Japanese" began to state on opinion surveys that they did not consider themselves Japanese... a result which the Japanese government then used to justify the registration booklet (later card) for those residents, even as it relaxed the fingerprinting requirement. The story indicates that Korean (and Chinese) residents will be exempted from the new requirements.

Posted by: keith on November 13, 2007 at 10:03 AM | PERMALINK

What a wanker that Patrick Henry was. It's too bad the colonists listened to him. A lot of those fools died. What good was freedom to them after they were dead?

Maybe that the City of Alexandria (VA) should re-name Patrick and Henry Streets and just call them Ronald and Reagan. Why "honor" a loser like that with street names?

The bombing begins in five minutes.

Posted by: ajw_93 on November 13, 2007 at 12:37 PM | PERMALINK




 

 

Read Jonathan Rowe remembrance and articles
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for Free News & Updates

Advertise in WM



buy from Amazon and
support the Monthly