Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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February 27, 2008
 
Comments

Yes, one of the great intellectual voices of White Supremacism and segregation. He will be missed (by David Duke).

Posted by: Joel on February 27, 2008 at 12:50 PM | PERMALINK

a fitting sign of the time i think

BTW
Dems have a big win in NYS 48th Senate district

the tide is turning

Posted by: David C Mace on February 27, 2008 at 12:51 PM | PERMALINK

He was a conservative in the best sense. Not a right wing religious nut but someone who could expound ad nauseum on conservative political positions without calling his political opposites traitors or accusing them of "supporting the terrorists." It is a loss to the notion of reasonable and responsible political discourse.

Posted by: lamonte on February 27, 2008 at 12:52 PM | PERMALINK

A fascinating life lived on someone else's dime.

Posted by: uri on February 27, 2008 at 12:54 PM | PERMALINK

He will be survived by his phony accent.

Posted by: Mr. Awful on February 27, 2008 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

A fascinating life lived on someone else's dime.
Posted by: uri on February 27, 2008 at 12:54 PM | PERMALINK

He will be survived by his phony accent.
Posted by: Mr. Awful on February 27, 2008 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

LOLOL.

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

We have now seen the last intelligent conservative pass. What is left is the Party of Stupidity, Cupidity, Vacuity, and Perfidity. He has gone to his grave, and left his turds behind. The conservaturds in the movement today are blinkered by ideology, terminally clueless, or mendacious to the extreme. Usually all three.

Posted by: POed Lib on February 27, 2008 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

Allow me to be the first to piss on his grave.
Posted by: Joel

Posted by: sjrsm on February 27, 2008 at 12:59 PM | PERMALINK

Allow me to be the first to piss on his grave.
Posted by: Joel

sjrsm: That's a gross exaggeration -- he clearly hasn't been buried yet.

Seriously, though, some people deserve eulogies and others deserve rebuke. WFB spoke out strongly against the Civil Rights Movement and in favor of White Supremacism when the latter was viciously slaughtering the former and WFB knew it.

Do you think I should praise him? Sorry, but that's not going to happen.

-- Joel

Posted by: Joel on February 27, 2008 at 1:04 PM | PERMALINK

I hesitate to "post" a moment of silence, because I wonder what the reaction would be from conservative's over the passing of, say, Gore Vidal. Would they condescendingly mark his passing, while Democrat's do the honorable thing for Buckley?

Eh, we're Democrats, and we're better than that. So I guess I give my begrudging respect to an intellectual conservative, while I hope for the present Republican Party's fall. In a way, he'd probably understand it.

Posted by: Boorring on February 27, 2008 at 1:04 PM | PERMALINK

Correction: "conservative's" to conservatives.

Posted by: Boorring on February 27, 2008 at 1:05 PM | PERMALINK

I will always savor the following parallelism between WFB and Noam Chomsky: Both of them were/are enamored of logical syllogisms of the sort "if A then not /A."

Prisoners of language, both.

Some of my favorite refutations of this sort of thinking: What is simple is not simple, and what is obvious is not obvious.

Thanks,
Matt Stern

Posted by: mattski on February 27, 2008 at 1:05 PM | PERMALINK

uri said "A fascinating life lived on someone else's dime."

Yes, he was the son of a wealthy man but he wrote 52 books. Hardly a sloth!

I'm no conservative but let's credit where it's due. I think POed Lib said it best.

Posted by: lamonte on February 27, 2008 at 1:06 PM | PERMALINK

uri: "A fascinating life lived on someone else's dime."

But isn't that the standard modus operandi for a modern conservative?

Posted by: Donald from Hawaii on February 27, 2008 at 1:07 PM | PERMALINK

Same feeling as Dorothy Parker, when she heard Cal Coolidge had died, "How can they tell?"

Posted by: Bob M on February 27, 2008 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

You people aren't fit to comment on the passing of a great man.

Hush. A moment of silence and respect is all I want to hear from the lot of you.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

It would be really nice if we on the left could restrain our snark and vitrol (unlike our friends on the right) for those who really deserved it. Buckley had his flaws and was wrong on a great many things but he was a good read and far from being the greatest evil of our time.

Posted by: arteclectic on February 27, 2008 at 1:12 PM | PERMALINK

"I hesitate to "post" a moment of silence..."

Well, in Buckley's case a "moment" could turn into an entire evening of rambling, pretentious, often drunken palaver in what passes for erudition among the "upper" classes in this country.

tee

Posted by: t on February 27, 2008 at 1:17 PM | PERMALINK

Oh, gee.

Posted by: Swan on February 27, 2008 at 1:18 PM | PERMALINK

he was a good read and far from being the greatest evil of our time

Damned by faint praise, indeed. (Or is this the soft bigotry of low expectations?)

I think Buckley died now for the same reason that Charles Schultz died before the last Peanuts strip was published. It's just too hard to see the end of your life's labors. A Democratic landslide this fall would have been too much for Buckley to bear.

Posted by: Oregonian on February 27, 2008 at 1:18 PM | PERMALINK

Did watching Obama run for president make him want to fold, or something?

Posted by: Swan on February 27, 2008 at 1:19 PM | PERMALINK

When I lived in Connecticut with my second wife, we lived near the Buckleys and enjoyed a lot of social interaction with them. Bill was friendly, always inviting people to go sailing, and he was a hard worker. A gentleman, to be certain.

He was more sold on Reagan than I was, and I was more sold on Nelson Rockefeller than he would ever admit. We were, the neither of us, fans of what is now a Bush dynasty, but his break was sooner than mine, to my everlasting regret. We both despised the Carter years, and few of us have good memories of those days. It's a void that I pour my bad memories into.

Bill could also give wise counsel. He assured me that my old friend Pete DuPont was going nowhere in 1988 but I didn't listen. I told him there was nothing to that Pat Robertson fellow and he told me that there was some undercurrent of evil there, something that would cause Republicans a great deal of regret in a future more free from religious superstitions. He counselled my eldest son to avoid the Air Force Academy; sadly, my boy didn't heed his advice and had to resign his commission after he was convicted of torturing animals. Bill warned my son that, by using firecrackers to dismember Barbie dolls, he was starting down a path that would lead him to professional ruin.

I saw him briefly in the early 1990s, and he warned me that the SEC was going to start cracking down on insider trading. Did I heed his advice? Sadly, I did not.

I wish to the Creator that I had. Today is a day of grief for me, and I am devastated. Devastated.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:21 PM | PERMALINK

Booring "Eh, we're Democrats, and we're better than that."

No, we're not -- we just try harder than Republicans to not pretend that we are, or ever were.

Posted by: Donald from Hawaii on February 27, 2008 at 1:22 PM | PERMALINK

Many of these comment are stunning in their viciousness and disrespect toward someone you don't know who just passed away and who many that do know describe as a kind and generous man.

I also am surprised by Kevin's failure to say anything, although I am not familiar with his practice on the death of newsworthy persons. I hope it is not fear of incurring the wrath of some of you folks who are posting hateful things here.

I trust some kind and generous liberal souls will show up on this thread. Nothing more from me on this one. If someone wants to read the remembrances of persons who actually knew and worked with Mr. Buckley, check out the corner.

http://corner.nationalreview.com/

Posted by: brian on February 27, 2008 at 1:26 PM | PERMALINK

No, we're not -- we just try harder than Republicans to not pretend that we are, or ever were.

Americans have a bit of perverted longing for the old aristocracy.

Posted by: Boronx on February 27, 2008 at 1:28 PM | PERMALINK

I trust some kind and generous liberal souls will show up on this thread. Nothing more from me on this one. If someone wants to read the remembrances of persons who actually knew and worked with Mr. Buckley, check out the corner.

Excuse me, shit for brains? I will handle the conservative aspect of this on this thread. I cannot post on the Corner, so I will post here.

You can leave now. I'm in charge of this thread.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:30 PM | PERMALINK

he was arrogant, smug, and wrong, much of the time. still, he was smart, articulate, learned, had a fair bit of integrity, and I begrudgingly liked him on occasion. I'll kind of miss him, and wish his survivors the best, and offer sincere condolences. I'm sorry the guy lived long enough to see his bastard children shit all over the higher hopes of his political/intellectual project. Must have been sad and embarrassing for him.

He was an institution and a better foe than Rove and Kristol and the other malevolent fucktards of our brave new world.

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 1:31 PM | PERMALINK


William F. Buckley, 1957:

“The central question that emerges … is whether the White community in the South is entitled to take such measures as are necessary to prevail, politically and culturally, in areas in which it does not prevail numerically? The sobering answer is Yes - the White community is so entitled because, for the time being, it is the advanced race. It is not easy, and it is unpleasant, to adduce statistics evidencing the cultural superiority of White over Negro: but it is a fact that obtrudes, one that cannot be hidden by ever-so-busy egalitarians and anthropologists.” (National Review, August 27, 1957).

But he was right about Pat Robertson and Barbie Dolls so I guess that's just fine.

Posted by: Joel on February 27, 2008 at 1:32 PM | PERMALINK

Correction: "conservative's" to conservatives.

All comments on a thread about Buckley's passing simply must be corrected. Also, we should institute a polysyllabic rule - every comment must have a word of more than three syllables.

Polysyllabic has five, so I'm good.

Posted by: Blue Girl, Red State on February 27, 2008 at 1:33 PM | PERMALINK

You can leave now. I'm in charge of this thread.
Posted by: Norman Rogers

The only thing Rogers is in charge of is his padded cell.

Posted by: DJ on February 27, 2008 at 1:36 PM | PERMALINK

Did Buckley ever regret/renounce his standing up for segregation, his willingness to tolerate second-class citizenship for blacks?

I doubt he was ever personally a hater but his writing lent bigots support and legitimacy. He was nothing but an apologist for nasty causes and nasty people.

That's why I never much cared for him.

And I never considered him to be a master prose stylist. Much of his writing read as though it had been dictated and never edited.

Yeah, he was better than today's conservatives. But that's not saying much.

Posted by: Auto on February 27, 2008 at 1:36 PM | PERMALINK

Joel:

Oh, please. Every white person in America thought that we white people were the most advanced race. Look at how big Elvis was, for example. All Buckley was saying was, for the next forty years or so, white people will run things and everyone else will gradually catch up. That's all.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:37 PM | PERMALINK

Norman Rogers: "Bill warned my son that, by using firecrackers to dismember Barbie dolls, he was starting down a path that would lead him to professional ruin."

I remember that all too well. But then, you were the twisted fuck who advised me to gang-rape them instead with passing squads of pillaging G.I. Joes.

Posted by: Norman Rogers' Son on February 27, 2008 at 1:40 PM | PERMALINK

I regret ever admitting my fancy for the blonde plastic to my heirs, it has caused them nothing but misery.

Posted by: Norman Rogers' Father on February 27, 2008 at 1:43 PM | PERMALINK

I always had to pick up the mess.

Posted by: Norman Roger's Slave on February 27, 2008 at 1:51 PM | PERMALINK

Hey Norman,

Sorry for your sense of personal loss, but your response to Joel is completely intellectually dishonest, and not particularly in the mold of the incisive and exacting character your morn today. Clearly the text Joel sites is indicative of tenacious racism of the first order. In 1957 he wasn't lynching people, but he was giving his utmost support to scoundrels who literally were. To say that every white person in America thought they were the most advanced race at the time is categorically untrue, and you do Buckley a disservice to so suggest.

My vague recollection is that he did back off from his racist apologetics, though I don't recall how unequivocally. I would hope he did so, as many of his generation eventually did, wholeheartedly.

It is nice to hear that on a personal level he seemed the gentleman, and had an eye and natural abhorrence for sadism and the evil undercarriage of evangelical Republicanism. In spite of his arrogance and wrongness he did have an air of humanity about him.

He seems to have realized in his latest years that his inheritors were morally and intellectually bankrupt, bullies, thugs, and thieves, and that the trail he had blazed had started wild fires that laid the country he loved to waste. I bow my sword to him, now that I can no longer skewer him with it.

RIP

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 1:51 PM | PERMALINK

I'm very sad to see Buckley go, too. He was an engaged and engaging intellectual.

Posted by: Barry on February 27, 2008 at 1:52 PM | PERMALINK

Whatever else may be said of Buckley, he really was the seminal figure in intellectual development, such as it was, of the Conservative movement.

It is fitting that he might pass away just as the Conservative movement has lost its last vestige of intellectual respectability. It has by now, in the person of George W Bush, been refuted by history, as was Communism by the fall of the Soviet Union.

With his death, William Buckley now serves as the bookend at both sides of the rise of the Conservative movement.

Posted by: frankly0 on February 27, 2008 at 1:52 PM | PERMALINK

Thank god that creep is dead. That guy oozed sleaziness and grease just like any lounge lizard or any Brylcreemed gas-station-attendant lothario. A founder of the modern conservative movement that gave us the sleaze and garbage of the Reagen and George W. Bush White Houses.

The guy wants gay people to get tattooed on their asses to prevent AIDS. Because, of course, gay people are all sexually active tramps wagging their asses, and that's all any of them are. This from a famously epicene, effeminate Texas phony married to one of the most hideous female impersonators in human history.

Posted by: Anon on February 27, 2008 at 1:53 PM | PERMALINK

"Life gave him so much, and he gave back so little."

Posted by: captcrisis on February 27, 2008 at 1:57 PM | PERMALINK

I clicked on here, having subscribed to the Washington Monthly back in the 1980s, to see what sensible liberals might have to say about the passing of a savvy, doughty opponent and gracious antagonist. The vitriol is quite a tonic. Damn shame that the readership seems to have dumbed down since the days of Charles Peters, Jim Fallows, and Nicholas Lemann.

Posted by: Ralph on February 27, 2008 at 1:57 PM | PERMALINK

My vague recollection is that he did back off from his racist apologetics, though I don't recall how unequivocally. I would hope he did so, as many of his generation eventually did, wholeheartedly.

And so did I! I do not harbor racist feelings, except perhaps against the fellow who took my plane reservation this morning--he was from the sub-continent and I have bad memories, bad memories of India which I cannot discuss here.

The problem with going back to the 1950s to damn a man who has passed are clear--fully 75% of you young people don't understand or don't remember how great it was to be an American during the 1950s. You could say or do anything without fear of being ridiculed or mocked. You could speak freely in this country, unless you were a Communist, of course. And people were generally friendlier, happier and more productive.

I blame the unhinged liberalism of the 1960s for the hatred all of you feel for people like myself and, to a lesser extent, Buckley. When the hippies came along and blew everyone's mind, they instilled in young activists and politically left leaning people a distaste for actual history and reasoned discourse.

What we are left with is some lame and pathetic fool, pretending to be my son and using phony handles. How funny was that? Not very. How original? Not at all. Did anyone bother to have so much as a yuk at it? No.

So there you have it. A great man passes, and a bunch of hairy liberals continue their public freak out. Big deal.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:59 PM | PERMALINK

It is SIMPLY UNREASONABLE to pin the racist thing on Buckley. He is the same age as my dad. Casual racism was much more common back then, and little was expected of blacks. My dad never said anything MUCH racist, although occassionally little things would creep out. My dad certainly had a LOT of casual anti-semitism, of the "I had to jew him down to get the right price" type.

Remember that our attitudes today are a product of many years of training. Mr. Buckley came of age before that. It is manifestly unfair to blame him for his age, his youth or his upbringing. He surpassed his background in my opinion.

Posted by: POed Lib on February 27, 2008 at 2:00 PM | PERMALINK

*

Posted by: mhr on February 27, 2008 at 2:01 PM | PERMALINK

...a kind and generous man

Who laughed sneeringly on TV at stories of poor kids in Harlem.

Posted by: Bob M on February 27, 2008 at 2:01 PM | PERMALINK

Damn shame that the readership seems to have dumbed down since the days of Charles Peters, Jim Fallows, and Nicholas Lemann.

Hear, hear! Thank you, sir. Thank you for those kind words.

I feel like an Oak tree, standing eighty feet tall, in a field of birches, stripped of their bark and leaning over from being weak and pathetic. You liberals have earned my scorn today, that is for certain.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 2:03 PM | PERMALINK

he may have been a graceful antagonist, but he was not a particularly gracious one.

I think the responses here are actually a fair and decent representation of the range of responses to his life and work he would anticipate and accept, including the crude ones (I don't think he was a pussy, he just played one on TV). What is most redemptive about him is that in the end he seemed to be admitting to himself and others that he was on the wrong side of history. It is fitting and gracious that he passed before witnessing any more of the repercussions of the rapaciousness of his political children, and one would hope, their repudiation at the ballot box and their prosecution in the courts.

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 2:05 PM | PERMALINK

Norman - to be fair, not all the comments have been as idiotic as the ones you site and some have been respectful.

Posted by: lamonte on February 27, 2008 at 2:05 PM | PERMALINK

I can see many of my fellow "progressives" can't stop themselves from being pigs on the occasion of a man's death.

Somebody remind me, what do I have in common with you people?

Posted by: frankly0 on February 27, 2008 at 2:06 PM | PERMALINK

I thought Kevin's post header said "WTF" not "WFB" at first. It would have been equally valid.

PO'ed, WRONG. Gunnar Myrdal wrote his famous report on race issues in America years before Buckley even became that famous in the first place. And, it wasn't "casual" racism that he was angling toward, anyway.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 2:06 PM | PERMALINK

With his death, William Buckley now serves as the bookend at both sides of the rise of the Conservative movement.

I salute you. An excellent observation. Indeed, his passing means that the intellectual gravitas of conservatism has ended. All that is left is morons. What passes for intellect these days is Fred Barnes, Bill Kristol, Jonah Goldberg, and Laura Ingraham.

Posted by: on February 27, 2008 at 2:07 PM | PERMALINK

Look folks, our modern notions of racial equity are modern. Blaming Buckley for the problems of society as a whole is unfair and ungracious. He was not a leader in racist rhetoric. He might have defended white privelege, but not any more than anyone.

Next, you are going to castigate daVinci for the lack of a driver's license.

Posted by: POed Lib on February 27, 2008 at 2:13 PM | PERMALINK

There's more racism directed at Barack Obama these days from so-called "enlightened" liberal progressives--on this VERY blog--than anything my old friend Bill could have directed at anyone.

Suck eggs, liberals. I won that point.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 2:15 PM | PERMALINK

The "Firing Line" show he hosted was something I rarely missed-especially in the 70's. He would have serious guests with very, very different views-something the rah-rah conservative lowest-common denominator types go nowhere near today. It was a treat to watch atheists and priests debate the existence of God. Every political stripe imaginable had some sort of voice there at some time or other. That was back when people still considered Communism a viable alternate political philosophy.

Posted by: Doc at the Radar Station on February 27, 2008 at 2:23 PM | PERMALINK

Somebody remind me, what do I have in common with you people?

Not a thing. Other than the long, empty hours on your hands from your very apparent lack of a life, job, mate, or self awareness, we can't understand why you hang out here. It only makes you a figure of greater ridicule every time you show up.

Posted by: bonds in seconds on February 27, 2008 at 2:24 PM | PERMALINK

Buckley dead, Pres Bush heading out the door and GHW Bush perhaps has had his last parachute ride--

Yales' Three killer bees are just about history.

Posted by: Dr WU-the last of the big time thinkers on February 27, 2008 at 2:30 PM | PERMALINK

Yesterday and tomorrow, WFB sucks. On the day of his passing, I'll note that, for a time (early-mid 60s), his magazine featured the uncrazy Garry Wills, Joan Didion, and Renata Adler. So there's that, at least.

Posted by: kth on February 27, 2008 at 2:33 PM | PERMALINK

it is also true that one of his finer features was an ability to personally get along with some of those he disagreed with intellectually and politically. I think that is the quality he demonstrated which commands my poignant sense of respect for him on his passing, to the extent that I feel any.

But this tall oak crap of you old guard types is as self indulgent as it is vapid, and my guess is that your hero would have the character to call ya'll on that tersely. He had a long and productive career. He was a racist and elitist apologist, he made some good arguments and some bad arguments, he nurtured a political heritage which has brought our country low on every measure, and he lived long enough and was honest enough to have some tragic recognition of this. He was a charming, incisive, phony, who did the country a lot of harm.

He would probably be more honest than you oak types, in seeing the braying disrespect he commands here as a sign that the ferment of the republic is alive and well, and that there is hope for the future.

He was a phony, and he was wrong, but his saving grace is that he knew it in the end and that he was capable of making friends across partisan lines.

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 2:36 PM | PERMALINK

Some will say good things about WFB
Some will say bad things about WFB
I am just glad he lived long enough to see his conservative project go to hell in a handbasket.
So far from what he intended.
I can't speak for his heart but he must of ended his days as a much humbled and chastised man, if his confrontation with Podhoretz on the NRO cruise is anything to go by.

He was too arrogant for his own good and he introduced extreme arrogance into the American right. His humbling is a just and preportionate reward.

RIP WFB

Posted by: Northern Observer on February 27, 2008 at 2:41 PM | PERMALINK

A parish priest, advised of the death of his bishop, was prompted for a comment.
"He's in a better world now . . . and so are we."

Posted by: Steve Paradis on February 27, 2008 at 2:44 PM | PERMALINK

I am just glad he lived long enough to see his conservative project go to hell in a handbasket.

Did you miss my point about how you liberal "progressives" are intent on tearing each other apart as you try to figure out whether to support Obama or Clinton?

None of you seem to get the irony--you're all so certain of victory that you can't see the iceberg that is going to tear the hull apart and sink you all. And Bill sent the iceberg. He will reach out from the beyond and make certain you liberals catch a good swift kick in the pants for your trouble.

Hubris. There's a good two syllable word for you all to learn.

Sucked those eggs yet?

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 2:44 PM | PERMALINK

PO'ed, the point is, back in the 1950s, plenty of whites were not only not defending white privelege, but were actually condemning it.

Let's take someone older, and of the same socioeconomic background, and almost the exact same part of the country: Eleanor Roosevelt.

Sorry, but Buckley deserves to be put in the dock.

Yes, he did mellow somewhat, tho I don't buy Trypticon's idea of the degree of change. But, was he ever apologetic?

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 2:44 PM | PERMALINK

Let's take someone older, and of the same socioeconomic background, and almost the exact same part of the country: Eleanor Roosevelt.

Ha! Shows you what you know! Eleanor owned slaves, you know.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 2:48 PM | PERMALINK

and yeah, Firing Line was good TV, unrecognizable in our age.

But Dick Cavet was better. Bless him.

grudging respect is better than any liberal hero would get from troglodytes on the right. i think we've given him a fair and balanced send off.

And Norm, and Mr. PO, you guys live in a free country and are welcome to choose more suitable company.

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 2:49 PM | PERMALINK

But Dick Cavet(t) was better. Bless him.

Yes, he was. Dick had me on his show three times. He was always a perfect gentleman, and we had a great time. Of course, socially, he moved in better circles than Bill.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 2:52 PM | PERMALINK

How I'd love to see those clips, Norm.

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 2:55 PM | PERMALINK

Time for the Moms Mabely quote.

They say you should only speak good of the dead.

He's dead.

Good.

Posted by: hexatron on February 27, 2008 at 3:02 PM | PERMALINK

Joel, did that quotation from National Review, August 27, 1957, appear under WB's byline, or was it attributed to him because he edited the magazine then?

Posted by: Dabodius on February 27, 2008 at 3:07 PM | PERMALINK

Does anyone else think that Norman Rogers is the reincarnation of famed Onion publisher T. Herman Zweibel? The similarities in prose are eery.

http://www.zweibelmemorial.org/

Posted by: drjimcooper on February 27, 2008 at 3:08 PM | PERMALINK

My opinions can wait, the man still has a family and so I give my condolences to them.

Posted by: Jet on February 27, 2008 at 3:09 PM | PERMALINK

Fuck anyone who excuses Buckley's racism on the ground that his views regarding blacks just happened to be what "everyone" in those days believed.

Buckley defended bigots during the middle of the Civil Rights revolution. That's the "everyone" who agreed with Buckley. MLK didn't feel that way. Nor did LBJ.

The father of modern conservatism was nothing but a well-spoken upper class apologist for bigotry.

Good riddance.

Posted by: Auto on February 27, 2008 at 3:12 PM | PERMALINK

The similarities in prose are eery.

It's called talent. No wonder you can't quite place it. And the word is eerie. As in, it's eerie to have you mouth-breathers stalking me.

I went to upbring a stack of videotapes from the old days onto the video archiving site on the Internet that they call the You Tube. I have one of those fancy computers with all of the multimedia programs, so the conversion from the dusty VHS and Betamax tapes is progressing slowly. (Yes, my Betamax player still works, and I have a fellow in town who will repair it from time to time for me.)

When it was time to start putting the videos onto the You Tube, I ran into a roadblock--they limit the length of the video to under a few minutes. How do I select which pieces to put up there? I have been on various public affairs and sporting programs--what do I choose to put up? Do I include my appearances on local public affairs programs? Do I include my hour long program on investing strategies that I did as a pilot program for PBS here in the Northeast? Do I include my appearances on various angler programs?

I even went on public access in New York City. I have a lovely tape of me sitting down with Phil Rizzuto to discuss Bernard Goetz.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 3:17 PM | PERMALINK

Well, condolences to his family I guess. I wouldn't be surprised if he was a good dad and charming friend in private life. Regardless though, his public legacy was and is noxious, shameful and dishonest.

Buckley was a Yalie child of privilege and conformity who spent literally his entire life publicly defending McCarthyism, segregation, the Vietnam insanity among other moral cesspools--and unceasingly aiming his loquacious, brimming asscheeks at the poor and powerless. He had a talent for literary sneering and sugarcoating fascism. Screw him, screw his yacht-based cheerleading for military imperialism and white supremacy, screw his "legacy", screw his megaphone lies.

Gore Vidal was 100% correct decades ago: William F. Buckley Jr. was a crypto-Nazi and a high-rent intellectual thug. Good riddance, and straight to Hell with him.

Posted by: Yaddayadda on February 27, 2008 at 3:19 PM | PERMALINK

So, Norman, you had Dick three times? Did you get your gay ass Buckley-tatttooed?

And PO'ed, beyond Buckley's forays into borderline racism -- and support of more outright racists like Steve Sailer -- Anon above rightly notes Buckley's gay bias, too.

Please don't defend that by talking about your dad's gay jokes.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 3:22 PM | PERMALINK

Buckley was eloquent, witty and civil and gave the Conservative movement the appearance of having an ideology and reasons for existing which the public could find appealing. That the party didn't actually adhere to any such ideology or philosophy is the fraud, the joke on the Republican electorate. They never actually stood for any ideas they could stand on a street corner and speak aloud. They have always been a party dominated by the insiders, the con men and the thieves -- and they behaved as such when in power.

Consider all the Republicans in the last couple of decades who have had to leave office because of scandals or who have had to go to jail. This isn't because of ideology.

The Bush mafia is the best example ever of how the insiders used the Republican party as a tool to get power and use (abuse) for their own purposes. The reason we don't know the 'real' reason we've gone into Iraq is that it serves the purposes of teh Bush mafia and those are not for public discussion. The Evangelicals, the Libertarians, the Rockefeller Republicans, the Reagan Democrats, they were all just along for the ride and were used to give the likes of George W. Bush power. That's all they were for and all the deals Bush made with them, all the things he offered them in trade for power were just lies. They stab their friends in the back when it comes time to do their part of the deal. They never intend to do anything for anybody, only for themselves.

Buckley, he had a good life on someone else's dime and was a tool of the insiders. But, he seemed to enjoy it.

Posted by: MarkH on February 27, 2008 at 3:23 PM | PERMALINK

Brilliant Norman! Keep up the excellent work!

Posted by: drjimcooper on February 27, 2008 at 3:24 PM | PERMALINK

Does anyone else think that Norman Rogers is the reincarnation of famed Onion publisher T. Herman Zweibel? The similarities in prose are eery.
Posted by: drjimcooper

Ignatius J. Reilly of Confederacy of Dunces fame. That is obviously.


"Then you must begin a reading program immediately so that you may understand the crises of our age," Ignatius said solemnly. "Begin with the late Romans, including Boethius, of course. Then you should dip rather extensively into early Medieval. You may skip the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. That is mostly dangerous propaganda. Now that I think of it, you had better skip the Romantics and the Victorians, too. For the contemporary period, you should study some selected comic books.... I recommend Batman especially, for he tends to transcend the abysmal society in which he's found himself. His morality is rather rigid, also. I rather respect Batman."

Posted by: sjrsm on February 27, 2008 at 3:25 PM | PERMALINK

So, Norman, you had Dick three times? Did you get your gay ass Buckley-tatttooed?

Moderator! I would like to report a hate crime! Moderator!

Such outrageousness will not be tolerated, sir. You are an evil weasel. And I know how to deal with weasels. I have enough weasel poison to take care of you and the rest of your kind.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 3:29 PM | PERMALINK

"every comment must have a word of more than three syllables.
Polysyllabic has five, so I'm good."
Posted by: Blue Girl, Red State on February 27, 2008 at 1:33 PM

"Polysyllabic" is good. "Sesquipedalian" is better.

Posted by: smartalek on February 27, 2008 at 3:34 PM | PERMALINK

So, Norman, you had Dick three times? Did you get your gay ass Buckley-tatttooed?

And PO'ed, beyond Buckley's forays into borderline racism -- and support of more outright racists like Steve Sailer -- Anon above rightly notes Buckley's gay bias, too.

...which apparently you share, given your first paragraph here. Jesus.

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 3:34 PM | PERMALINK

When it was time to start putting the videos onto the You Tube, I ran into a roadblock--they limit the length of the video to under a few minutes. How do I select which pieces to put up there?

Just get a director's account at YT, Norm. Then you can put up entire shows until the copyright cops come to getcha.

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 3:38 PM | PERMALINK

"When the hippies came along and blew everyone's mind, they instilled in young activists and politically left leaning people a distaste for actual history and reasoned discourse."
Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 1:59

Some small minority of the DFHs might have furthered the anti-intellectual bent in American politics, but they were pikers compared to what McCarthy -- Joe, not Gene -- had done over a decade earlier. Credit where credit is due.

Posted by: smartalek on February 27, 2008 at 3:42 PM | PERMALINK

Shortstop, you obviously get neither parody nor irony nor sarcasm. Geez.

It's called "snark," Shortstop. Learn the word.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 3:43 PM | PERMALINK

So now blatant hate crimes are "snark" on progressive blogs?

So, Norman, you had Dick three times? Did you get your gay ass Buckley-tatttooed?

Shame on you, sir. Shame on you.

Posted by: Norman Rogers on February 27, 2008 at 3:45 PM | PERMALINK

Gadfly, people here spend a not-insubstantial amount of time explaining jokes to you and laughing as you earnestly argue with parody posters. Could it be that your snark just wasn't...witty?

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 3:50 PM | PERMALINK

SS, did you think I take Norman as something other than parody myself? And, the only "joke" I missed recently was not catching Kevin's Jabberwocky reference with "mysteriouser."

If your comment was intended as parody, IMO, it was weaker than mine.

If it wasn't parody, I reject both it and your follow-up comment.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 3:53 PM | PERMALINK

Shame on you, sir. Shame on you.

Full disclosure: Howard Wolfson is Norm's communications director, too.

Posted by: shortstop on February 27, 2008 at 3:54 PM | PERMALINK

Most of you should be ashamed at yourselves.

Read WFB's comments on Gailbraith's passing. They were generous, sincere and decent. More than I can say for most of you.

Fucking children.

Posted by: James on February 27, 2008 at 3:59 PM | PERMALINK

furthermore, WFB recanted his opposition to the civil rights movement:

http://papercuts.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/27/qa-with-sam-tanenhaus-on-william-f-buckley/

Posted by: James on February 27, 2008 at 4:05 PM | PERMALINK

"Antidisestablishmentarianism"...That's my 12. "Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis" is still open, however. Y'all are welcome.

Having said all that, and it is a mouthful, you never like to hear of a person's death, if for no other reason than that it reminds you of your own mortality. It's sad to hear about anyone passing away.

Posted by: grape_crush on February 27, 2008 at 4:06 PM | PERMALINK

I still wish that Gore Vidal had been able to get ahold of him.

Posted by: R.L. on February 27, 2008 at 4:15 PM | PERMALINK

I love it when conservatives demand respect while ridiculing their fellow humans, then spew illogical nonsense and none to vague homicidal threats.

it justs serves to clarify who they are and what they're about. trying to be respectful here, and realizing what a ridiculous waste of time that is...

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 4:15 PM | PERMALINK

William F. Buckley, Jr. on the War on Drugs:

WE ARE speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen -- yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. [...]

I leave it at this, that it is outrageous to live in a society whose laws tolerate sending young people to life in prison because they grew, or distributed, a dozen ounces of marijuana. I would hope that the good offices of your vital profession would mobilize at least to protest such excesses of wartime zeal, the legal equivalent of a My Lai massacre. And perhaps proceed to recommend the legalization of the sale of most drugs, except to minors.

Here's Buckley's eulogy for Peter McWilliams.

Buckley on Bush and the Iraq War:

"One can't doubt that the American objective in Iraq has failed. . . .
If you had a European prime minister who experienced what we've experienced it would be expected that he would retire or resign," Buckley says.

Buckley on Bill Clinton:

Bill Clinton ``is the most gifted politician of, certainly my time,'' Buckley said.

Posted by: Pete Guither on February 27, 2008 at 4:20 PM | PERMALINK

thanks for this James:

"A: Yes, he did. He said it was a mistake for National Review not to have supported the civil rights legislation of 1964-65, and later supported a national holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom he grew to admire a good deal, above all for combining spiritual and political values."

another redemptive quality of WBF was his ability to admire the works of people he politically opposed. i'd say a major example of that was Edmund Wilson who i believe he considered to be the greatest critic in the US despite his committed leftism.

still, the left has no cause to lionize this fellow. his death marks the end of an era, the end of times when people could have intellectual disagreements about politics and still be nominally respectful, and the end to any reasonable claim that the right has any intellectual credibility.

RIP.

and then onward. out with the old and in with the new.

Posted by: Trypticon on February 27, 2008 at 4:27 PM | PERMALINK

There's some justice in that he lived to see the degeneration of the conservative movement he helped found. One hopes that the modern conservative movement -- which embraces torture, voodoo economics anti-intellectualism and authoritarianism -- isn't long in following him to the grave, or at least irrelevance.

Posted by: Gregory on February 27, 2008 at 4:38 PM | PERMALINK

James:

Thanks for the link to where the editor of the NYTimes book review and a biographer of Buckley is answering questions about Buckley. It is very interesting --

http://papercuts.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/27/qa-with-sam-tanenhaus-on-william-f-buckley/

I was not that great of fan of Buckley (I found him too hard to read and listen to - which no doubt reflects poorly on me, not him), but in this thread of much personal hating and disparaging comments, I could not resist the irony of posting the first question posed to Mr. Tanenhaus about Buckley and his answer that "I never heard him make a personally disparaging remark about anyone, even adversaries like Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. and Gore Vidal."

Q: What is the most surprising discovery you’ve made while working on this biography of William F. Buckley Jr.? —Joyce Huyett Turner

A: There were two. First, he would rather talk about almost anything other than politics — literature, music, sailing, music. He once told me, “I only talk about politics when someone pays me to do it.” Second, I never heard him make a personally disparaging remark about anyone, even adversaries like Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. and Gore Vidal. He might describe something they did or the style in which they did it, but never in an insulting or even critical way. He had a large sense of the human comedy.

Posted by: brian on February 27, 2008 at 5:07 PM | PERMALINK

I was very sorry to hear it. I remember that my parents watched Firing Line very faithfully. Buckley was very entertaining to watch as he argued with Susskind, Mailer and the like.

Posted by: Susan on February 27, 2008 at 6:47 PM | PERMALINK

Even Buckley pretty soon saw the failure that was and is George W. Bush. As an old school conservative he talked openly about the folly of going into Iraq and dismissed Bush as inept. I'm sure he went to his grave with serious sadness over what the nouveau conservatives have done to his party.

Posted by: carol on February 27, 2008 at 6:58 PM | PERMALINK

Though I found myself in vociferous disagreement with Mr. Buckley on just about everything, there's no denying that an intellectual giant has left the stage, and that we are all diminished by his departure.

Mrs. T will disagree with me.

At the same time, when I heard him on the radio a year or two ago saying "If I'd known then what I know now about Iraq I'd have opposed the war" (I paraphrase, of course) I wanted to put my hand into the speaker and tear his head off.

As an aside, isn't it interesting that we liberals are so intolerant of differing opinions, and yet nobody (not even Norman) can post at NRO.

Posted by: thersites on February 27, 2008 at 7:05 PM | PERMALINK

This may be an indication of WFB's character: on page 185 of How to Win Arguments by William A. Rusher, he quotes some advice by various commentators in response to a list of questions. Buckley's point re question #5: "When an arguer is caught in a mistake his best course of action [the question] is to trivialize its significance." Michael Harrington said, "Admit the mistake quickly and openly." Harold Miller: "Admit it. ..." Daniel Patrick Moynihan: " ... a person of any integrity admits it right off."

tyrannogenius

Posted by: Neil B. on February 27, 2008 at 7:14 PM | PERMALINK

I found the debate that he and Gore Vidal had at the 1968 Democratic convention (audio):
http://www.pitt.edu/~kloman/vidal.mp3

Posted by: Doc at the Radar Station on February 27, 2008 at 7:28 PM | PERMALINK

Great debater.

He inspired me to turn my politics to communism briefly when he didn't pay me for a Nat. Review article I wrote--like he's rich and I'm poor, you know--but I later returned to conservatism.

Posted by: Luther on February 27, 2008 at 7:40 PM | PERMALINK

If anything, Buckley's life and writings serve to illustrate with great precision what really lies at the heart of the conservative temperament: the preservation of privilege. Whether in terms of race, gender or religion, Buckley's career was dedicated to the feudalistic proposition that privilege and power are always honorable and that those who question inequality and injustice in society are at best fools and at worst traitors. His genteel manner and great wit notwithstanding, he viewed the poor, minorities, feminists, and liberals as obnoxious pests in the well-tended garden of his white, yachting, upperclass world and mistook this pretension as dedication to "freedom."

Posted by: jonas on February 27, 2008 at 7:41 PM | PERMALINK

Buckley was, on the whole, a principled conservative who could support what he believed in with facts and figures. Why would any thinking liberal expect WFB to support causes that are/were considered "liberal" (that includes racial equality)? After all, a conservative wishes to maintain the staus quo, doesn't he?
From what I have read that he wrote, I got the impression that he didn't necessarily oppose the ends that liberals wanted to get to (racial equality, fairer wages, environmental protection, etc.) so much as the method we want to use (the government).
I can safely say that I wish the present Republican Party consisted more of Buckleys than Bushes.

Posted by: Doug on February 27, 2008 at 7:52 PM | PERMALINK

Clarence Darrow:

"I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure."

Mark Twain

"I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it."

These quips pretty much sum it up for me.

Posted by: Dilbert on February 27, 2008 at 7:57 PM | PERMALINK

I used to read his columns in the newspaper in the 1970s. After a while, it became apparent that Buckley would defend Catholicism above any other position, including the traditionally conservative. One of my mentors (himself a real intellectual and eventually an elected member of the National Academy of Science) responded to my remark by saying, "He's absolutely predictable." That said it all at the time.

It should be pointed out that his opposition to the civil rights movement in the 1960s was a logical part of his conservative philosophy, but so what? All that shows is that his philosophy countenanced evil. Why shouldn't we recognize this? The fact that he later recanted (as did Gov. George Wallace) allows for a modest level of forgiveness, but should not be used to credit his intellect, his goodness, or his philosophy.

His opposition to the war on drugs and his obituary for the victim(s) was to his credit and should be brought back up in the next administration. That's one issue where a states' rights approach could be useful.

Posted by: Bob G on February 27, 2008 at 8:02 PM | PERMALINK

I have always thought of Buckley as a supercilious, pompous jerk. He must be proud of the conservative movement today: ruinous fiscal policies and massive deficit spending, messianic, nation-building crusades abroad, our nation despised abroad, etc.

Posted by: bob h on February 27, 2008 at 8:07 PM | PERMALINK

it was mentioned that he succumbed to emphysema. was buckley a smoker of cigarettes?

if so, it would appear as if he hid that addiction quite successfully[unlike his friend, bill bennet].

in his dotage, after the "conservative" movement passed into some form of virulent "statism", it would appear as if he commenced upon a reflection of that evolution that he energized.

contrary to what some think, bill was never a conservative. he was an erstwhile aristocrat...a plutocrat.

deep down in his soul, he always believed that money/wealth was the finest discriminator of importance. though he was a catholic, his real god was mammon.

he was a conservative only in the sense that he wanted to conserve the governance of the united states of amerika for the control of the plutocracy. and understanding that, he was a reactionary...his love was for the united states in its infancy, when the ownership of property was the entitlement to constitutional "rights"[i.e, the right to vote]. essentially, his objective was to aristocratize the united states of amerika: to restore it to a britanic social model without a parliament. a monarchist?

well, he had a quick wit and a great thesaurus. but he was no conservative. that he styled himself as one reveals his charlatan nature. he was, as is his successor[rush limbo], a performer. and for a segment of the marketplace, a damn good one. it continues to astonish me how many people i know/knew who relished his skewering of individuals with a different take on the usa.

with rare exception, what i found painful was to listen to his opponents being so inept.

but in the main, they were all "statists" arguing over who would be best able to control the "state" .

it was never any deeper than that.

so i say, requiescat in pacem.

oh, one thing about bill that needs be said, he had a great love for the works of bach. but i recall he denounced glenn gould, then praised wanda landowska. go figure? i suppose gould's vision of bach was too heretical for the aristocratic bill buckley.

Posted by: albertchampion on February 27, 2008 at 8:24 PM | PERMALINK

I'm thinking right now of Robin Williams' Aladdin impersonation.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on February 27, 2008 at 9:58 PM | PERMALINK

"Everyone detected with AIDS should be tatooed in the upper forearm, to protect common-needle users, and on the buttocks, to prevent the victimization of other homosexuals." -- William F. Buckley.

Let this be chiseled on his tombstone as his epitaph and monument to his life's work.

Posted by: Stefan on February 27, 2008 at 10:34 PM | PERMALINK

i almost forgot, bill had a brother, jim. and, i speculate that jim and bill conspired to radically alter the dimensions of what constitutes "free speech".

it was jim buckley versus vallejo that resulted in a fascist supreme court equating dollars with speech.

the plutocrats' wetdreams come true. and the buckleys were responsible.

the unassailable establishment of BIG BROTHER stems from this decision.

this was the decision that drove the dagger deeper, killing a federal republic. which would now metastasize into into a dictatorship of the monied.

so, thinking on the buckleys in that respect, i think of the ancient bedouin curse.....

may a camel sit on the bones of you and your ancestors. forever.

Posted by: albertchampion on February 27, 2008 at 10:59 PM | PERMALINK

Reading through these comments, I am again reminded why I am not a liberal. There is a vicious streak of intolerance among many on the left in America. William F. Buckley, on the other hand, was the model of tolerance and civility.

Seriously, Kevin Drum should simply close his comments down. It must be discouraging for him to know the kinds of people that read his posts and comment on his blog.

Posted by: Dan Morgan on February 27, 2008 at 10:59 PM | PERMALINK

I'm curious Dan, were you so offended when John Kenneth Galbraith passed a couple of years ago and the right wing went into paroxisms of glee?

Frank Kelly is getting up there - what kind of response do you think the wingosphere will have when he shuffles off this mortal coil? How about Gore Vidal? I can only imagine the vitriol that will fly at sites like Little Green Goofballs when either of those gentlemen pass.

In other words, sweep your own back porch before you go and criticize the folks commenting here, or anywhere else, for not showing what you deem proper reverence.


Posted by: Blue Girl, Red State on February 27, 2008 at 11:26 PM | PERMALINK

Dan Morgan: Reading through these comments, I am again reminded why I am not a liberal.

Bullshit. If a few blog comments make you shy from your convictions--if in fact they are "liberal"--then they are unworthy of any name, save perhaps "coward".

Posted by: has407 on February 28, 2008 at 12:19 AM | PERMALINK

dan morgan is illiterate. and a fascist bastid.

Posted by: albertchampion on February 28, 2008 at 1:08 AM | PERMALINK

Buckley once said that Bil Clinton should suffer the fate of Abelard.

Posted by: deejaayss on February 28, 2008 at 1:37 AM | PERMALINK

Dan Morgan wrote: There is a vicious streak of intolerance among many on the left in America. William F. Buckley, on the other hand, was the model of tolerance and civility.

Liberals have a "vicious streak"? Ooookaaay. Let's just wait until a liberal icon passes away one of these days, shall we? And then we'll go see what's said about him or her on FreeRepublic, Redstate, etc. and then we'll talk about "tolerance" and "civility". I'm sure it will be most educative. It's not being vicious to point out that someone's ideas have, on the whole, been to the country's disadvantage even if that person had, as an individual, some redeeming qualities. Buckley was a charming and erudite fellow who just happened to have some truly awful ideas. He thought Joe McCarthy was a great American, that Southern whites had every right to keep Jim Crow and that the women's movement was a harbinger of the end times. He was on the wrong side of history just about every time. Like I said, a man of impeccable taste, but terrible moral and political judgment.

Posted by: jonas on February 28, 2008 at 1:49 AM | PERMALINK

Good riddance, racist McCarthyite scum. And let's not forget that he gave us the National Review and Christopher Buckley.

Posted by: Mark on February 28, 2008 at 2:06 AM | PERMALINK

I DON'T KNOW WHO THE F*CK DAN MORGAN IS.

AND WHOMEVER IT WAS THAT USED MY NAME TO DENOUNCE HIM, F*CK THAT INDIVIDUAL.

THIS WILL NOT BE THE FIRST TIME THAT MY NAME HAS BEEN APPROPRIATED.

STILL, DAN MORGAN IS AN IDIOT.

Posted by: albertchampion on February 28, 2008 at 3:49 AM | PERMALINK

Certain events have great power to unmask the true face. The passing of WFB is such an event. I clicked on this comment link fully suspecting what I would find. You have not disappointed me.

Posted by: Brad on February 28, 2008 at 5:23 AM | PERMALINK

He was eloquent--and, of course, wrong.

Still, something of the passing of an era, and, failing that, a man; thus deserving of at least a modicom of respect.

Posted by: monoglot on February 28, 2008 at 5:23 AM | PERMALINK

The many compassionate conservative remarks about Rachel Corrie's tragic murder on LGF come to mind--truly edifying to higher-ground, tender-eared conservatives such as Mr. Morgan, I'm sure.

And let's recall the Rove-ian GOP smear following the Wellstone funeral. Ah, Turdblossom...what a prime example of GOP ethical superiority. And let's not forget Jerry Falwell's theory of 911 responsibility--it was clearly God's wrath against fags, so sayeth that gasbag hatemonger...or was that GOP holy man Pat Robertson?

And of course John McCain's sharpened tongue--more hate talk than straight talk--a man in his sixties with children of his own, yet still couldn't resist the GOP dogpile on Chelsea Clinton. Such presidential dignity and maturity. Not a typical GOP psychopath at all.

Screw the GOP moral indignation routine. It's pure BS--just look at Mark Foley, Ted Haggard, and Larry Craig. Republicans these days are people of the lie, it's that plain and simple.

Posted by: Yadda Yadda on February 28, 2008 at 6:01 AM | PERMALINK

William F. Buckley, on the other hand, was the model of tolerance and civility.

The one who called Gore Vidal a queer and advocated Southern whites using force to put down the uppity Negroes, you mean?

That's some fine concern trolling there, Dan. You even upstaged brian, whose act is more than a little hackneyed by now.

Posted by: Gregory on February 28, 2008 at 8:55 AM | PERMALINK

Good riddance.

Posted by: The Fool on February 28, 2008 at 10:20 AM | PERMALINK

Dan Morgan: Seriously, Kevin Drum should simply close his comments down.

Buckley would be proud.

Posted by: thersites on February 28, 2008 at 10:55 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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