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Tilting at Windmills

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September 25, 2008

PALIN'S PENTECOSTAL WITCH HUNTER.... A few weeks ago, the McCain campaign told CNN that Sarah Palin "doesn't consider herself Pentecostal." That seems a little hard to believe right now.

This rather striking video resurfaced yesterday of Palin at her former church, where her witch-obsessed pastor laid hands on her. "In the name of Jesus, in the name of Jesus, every form of witchcraft is what we rebuke in the name of Jesus," the pastor says in the video from 2005.

Just to clarify, the pastor's interest in witches and witch hunts is not metaphorical -- he means it literally.

Last night, reporting on the video, Keith Olbermann posed this question: "If you had a story, with videotape, of a pastor from Kenya, who got his start in witch-hunting, laying his hands on a candidate, and the candidate's last name was, just to pick one at random, 'Obama,' what would be happening right now?"

Andrew Sullivan, who tends to be more comfortable with religion in politics than I am, added, "Even I am a little shocked by this video from Palin's church. Asking God to protect her from witchcraft?"

Stepping back, people will, of course, draw their own conclusions about a national candidate who is (or was) a practicing Pentecostal, attending a church where people speak in tongues, where the pastor seems preoccupied with witches. Voters' comfort levels will vary, and I'm still inclined to think politicians' spiritual beliefs, whether part of the mainstream or not, are a personal matter.

I do, however, have two unresolved questions. First, does she believe in the separation of church and state, and is she comfortable with a government that remains entirely neutral on matters of faith? And second, does she believe public officials should use religious beliefs to shape public policy? Palin recently said those fighting the war in Iraq are "out on a task that is from God," and added, in the same remarks, that "God's will" was responsible for a national gas pipeline project in Alaska.

Might she be willing to elaborate on what this means?

Update: Sullivan also notes that Palin's pastor had some interesting things to say about "the Israelites."

Steve Benen 11:20 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (65)

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Comments

This is an unfair assault on Governor Palin -- the Constitution provides a clear separation between witchcraft and state.

Posted by: pj in jesusland on September 25, 2008 at 11:24 AM | PERMALINK

Of course, no one will be allowed to ask her about any of this.

Posted by: ohcomeonhussein on September 25, 2008 at 11:25 AM | PERMALINK

When the going gets weird...

Posted by: lobbygow on September 25, 2008 at 11:26 AM | PERMALINK

i want to know why the pastor believed she needed saved from witchcraft.

more important, i want to know if i thinks he got it all, because she still seems like a witch to me.

Posted by: zeitgeist on September 25, 2008 at 11:28 AM | PERMALINK

The trouble with this video is that it only shows the section where Palin appears -- just under 3 minutes. The WHOLE video -- which runs nearly 10 minutes -- of the sermon is much scarier, and is available -- as I mentioned earlier -- at
http://mudflats.wordpress.com/2008/09/25/palin-and-the-witch-hunter-chapter-ii/

and includes such gems as:

5:00 - We need God to ‘take over the education system.’

5:27 - We need God to ‘take over the media’ and Hollywood itself.

6:08 - We need the government run by born-again Christians.

Posted by: Prup (aka Jim Benton) on September 25, 2008 at 11:29 AM | PERMALINK

That settles it -- Sabrina, her aunts Hilda and Zelda, and Samantha are backing Obama. Beware the wrath of blonde TV witches!

Posted by: Vincent on September 25, 2008 at 11:29 AM | PERMALINK

I think that if a candidate's faith is a big part of their appeal, then it is important for us to know jsut exactly what they believe. For instance, does Palin think that all Jews and Catholics are going to hell when they die? Many people who share her brand of religion seem to think so. I think that Jewish and Catholic voters should know. Does she believe that suicide bombers are sent to Israel by God to help them convert to Christianity?

Does she believe that the rapture will be occurring soon? How will this affect her worldview and foreign policy positions? Many of the these people WANT the world to end. Does she share that position?

Posted by: Raindog on September 25, 2008 at 11:30 AM | PERMALINK

Steve,

I am usually in total agreement with what you write, but the comment about Iraq really is being consistently misrepresented. Palin didn't say that those in Iraq were "out on a mission from God." She prayed that they would be. In religious circles, this is a common sort of sentiment drawing from "not my will but thine be done." The idea is that one is trying to do God's will, but is also asking for guidance because one realises that he or she is fallible, especially as it comes to God's will.

That may have been inpolitic or unwise to say, sadly enough, but it isn't what you are claiming it is. There are plenty of things to hit Palin on without misrepresenting her words. When you and others (Rachel Maddow springs to mind) are willing to distort her words on this issue, you throw doubt on all your analysis. This is a very bad thing precisely because you and Rachel are both leading lights in consistent, hard hitting and fair criticism of Palin/McCain.

Posted by: socratic_me on September 25, 2008 at 11:32 AM | PERMALINK

I have to say that my first reaction to that video was one of revulsion. It doesn't so much as look like a sermon, or a religious discussion, or even a visit by a charismatic religious thinker so much as it resembles a harangue by a discredited zealot. It doesn't invite a "tolerance" for the material because the material itself is intolerant in its nature. There is a long history of ties between US denominations and African countries, through charity and outreach programs. This goes way beyond that, and ventures into areas that are "dominionist." Most Christians would reject "dominionist" rhetoric, I believe.

If that video gets more exposure, and if more and more Americans can see the extremism and overall zealotry expressed in it, I would be willing to bet that a large number of Christians who call themselves conservatives would turn completely away from Palin. She might be right with their "issues," but her church and the presence of this Bishop indicates a level of zealotry that just isn't going to sit well with them. You really can't deviate from mainstream Christianity and then expect large segments of that population who self-identify as Christians (of varying denominations) to be comfortable with this portrayal. It's the generalized linking of snakes, the speaking in tongues, the obscure references and the references to witchcraft that are the most unsettling for followers of mainstream Christianity. As a Lutheran, I would get up and walk out. Others might disagree or be more comfortable with it--I don't know.

And, I'm pretty sure there's no such thing as witchcraft.

Posted by: Warren Street on September 25, 2008 at 11:32 AM | PERMALINK

Hmm...should be interesting to see if this gains speed.

I mean she's white, so crazy pastors shouldn't matter (see McCain, John.)

HOWEVER

The pastor in question is black. African black (Arab African? What does Rush say?). There are slight echoes of "Birth of Nation" here isn't there? I'm guessing there's a large swath of men who are ill at ease (if only subconciously)watching their sex object being touched by an African Pastor (read: voodoo witchdoctor).

I'm interested to see how this plays out, if only from an anthropological point of view. Polling this specific video would be fascinating wouldn't it?

Posted by: neilt on September 25, 2008 at 11:33 AM | PERMALINK

Congratulations world, you have found the only person with a voice more annoying than Sarah Palin's.

Seriously, her pastor's voice makes me think he's in immediate need of an exorcism.

Where's Bobby Jindal when you need him?

Posted by: doubtful on September 25, 2008 at 11:34 AM | PERMALINK

I'm a bit uneasy about this. The second question is a good one, given Palin's public statements. As for the first question, though, just because her pastor has some... odd beliefs, why does that make her less likely to believe in church-state separation than any other American Christian?

Posted by: Lucia on September 25, 2008 at 11:34 AM | PERMALINK

any links to people scrutinizing the authenticity of this video?

I'm a little giddy at the concept of it being true because I've been to an Assembly of God service and the idea of someone capturing this on video of Palin herself is astounding and could lead to youtube hilarity.

I was just wondering as to confirmation of authenticity.

Posted by: phreak on September 25, 2008 at 11:34 AM | PERMALINK

I beg to differ. It's a personal matter only so long as the person in question does not use the mere fact of her being religious a qualification for national office. If she and her supporters tout her religosity as one of her main qualifications, we have all the right to question her beliefs.

You cannot have your God and club others with Him too.

Posted by: gregor on September 25, 2008 at 11:35 AM | PERMALINK

First, does she believe in the separation of church and state, and is she comfortable with a government that remains entirely neutral on matters of faith? And second, does she believe public officials should use religious beliefs to shape public policy?


This all relates back to the rape kit controversy. There is no rational explanation of why she would cut the $14000 contingency fund for that, while increasing spending everywhere else, other than the fact that some rape kits include emergency contraception, which her church believes is abortion, which is murder. So as far as I am concerned your extremely relevant questions have been asked and answered based on her past actions.

Posted by: majun on September 25, 2008 at 11:36 AM | PERMALINK

When the going gets weird

Priceless lobbygow! What a bunch of fruitcakes, like really super scary 20, year old K-mart blue light special fruitcakes, half-off!

Posted by: The Galloping Trollop on September 25, 2008 at 11:36 AM | PERMALINK

Well, Pastor, it looks like your casting out of witchcraft did not work.

Posted by: tablogloid on September 25, 2008 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

Well, Pastor, it looks like your casting out of witchcraft did not work.

Posted by: tablogloid on September 25, 2008 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

Pentacostal folks do tend to believe in separation of their public and private images (what happens in their churches is nobody else's business), and yet have no problem morphing their minority beliefs into public budgets, statutes, and constitutions.

That dichotomy doesn't lend itself transparency or accountability.

Posted by: Bose on September 25, 2008 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

Steve-

Maybe you can get someone to lay hands on you to save you from further beyoch-craft. You know, from the evil that is the Clinton with their snake-in-the-grass, duplicitous messages lurking deep somewhere in the underside of their unprecedented number of Obama-supporting public and media appearances - not-to-mention the evil Clinton's hidden 2012 agenda that is apparent because Bill doesn't have the Obama tattoo on his forehead yet and invites McCain (and the non-tattoo) to speak at non-partisan events.

Posted by: colonpowwow on September 25, 2008 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

She's a witch.

How do you know she's a witch?

She turned me into a Newt.

You don't look like a Newt.

I got better.

What floats in water.

Ducks, wood, witches.

Burn her, burn her.

My inner Python.

Posted by: David on September 25, 2008 at 11:41 AM | PERMALINK

For the sake of fairness (a virtue that distinguishes us Dems from the other party), a couple points on caution and cultural context: (1) it's the pastor who denounces withchcraft, not Palin; and (2) That the pastor is Kenyan is crucial. In Africa, Christian missionaries (who are legion) label the traditional religions "witchcraft." Indeed, things we would consider superstitions or magical are deeply woven into many sub-Saharan Africans' belief systems and daily lives (I've taught in East Africa, so I know a little bit about this). In Kenya, his denunciation of witchcraft would be standard fare for a convert.

Posted by: SteveC on September 25, 2008 at 11:41 AM | PERMALINK

Does this mean Palin would wrap drapes around any nude statuary in the White House?

Posted by: Gregory on September 25, 2008 at 11:41 AM | PERMALINK

This is actually not uncommon in the Evangelical/Pentacostal crowd: they're big on "rebuking" demons, devils, Satan, witches, you name it.

Posted by: Speed on September 25, 2008 at 11:43 AM | PERMALINK

Might she be willing to elaborate on what this means?

Get with the program, Steve. Mavericks don't elaborate shit.

Meanwhile, what's the difference between Sarah Palin and Tammy Faye Baker?

The amount of lipstick.

Posted by: chrenson on September 25, 2008 at 11:44 AM | PERMALINK

Steve Benen and others such as Rachel Maddow are not at all mis-representing this direct line to God nonsense. I'm glad they are bringing it out.

I think it should also be juxtaposed next to photos of areial hunting...

Palin seems to think she has a personal, direct line to God, that she can pray for specific things and that God is listening to her and protecting her political beliefs and policy. What B.S.

Many others who pray do so with humility, with just a general request to be able to do the right thing--they don't ask or assume they are deserving of any special protection--and they certainly don't imagine a supreme being that has the time or inclination to focus on their needs alone--to the extent one believes this, they are narcissistic unbelievably arrogant (pretending to be devoutly religious) and stupid beyond belief.

It's downright scary to see her seriously engage those 'witch-proof' sessions.

Posted by: on September 25, 2008 at 11:47 AM | PERMALINK

You know, from the evil that is the Clinton with their snake-in-the-grass... -colonpowwow

And not you're just officially trolling. Keep it in the Clinton thread, and spare us the unfounded indignation, please.

Posted by: doubtful on September 25, 2008 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

Well, we at least know that she'll be in shape to lead the crusade against voodoo economics! (rimshot)

Posted by: jonas on September 25, 2008 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

The Pastor reminds me of those Nigerians the Dateline NBC guys are always catching in financial scams.

What do you think the odds are that this guy was email spamming the world just a few years ago, trying to save the King and his 30M bank account from a military coup? I think the odds are pretty good.

Posted by: Jake on September 25, 2008 at 11:49 AM | PERMALINK

I had a lot of experience working for the charity side of a fundamentalist Christian organization. Believe me when I say that they DO NOT separate religion from anything in their lives, let alone power, money and control over the way people should think, act, play etc. They actively believe it is their God-given mission to convert everyone that does not agree with them. They still send out missionairies, for chrissakes. Be very, very afraid of these people in positions of power. Tolerance of others is not even on the table.

Posted by: jward23 on September 25, 2008 at 11:49 AM | PERMALINK

Witches be gone! Now feel the presence of the Lord running through your body and out through your tongue -- hummana, hummana, boogity, boogity, blup, blup, beezle, beezle....

Posted by: RollaMO on September 25, 2008 at 11:51 AM | PERMALINK

Also, for all the "sake of fairness" comments above [and I do think you've made excellent points], what Steve is asking us to do here is consider what would happen with this video if it were Obama standing there.

And he's asking legitimate religious/policy questions of a candidate who makes no secret of her religious beliefs but has been silent on how those beliefs might shape her policies. It's the same as asking a supreme court nominee if he/she is for or against abortion.

Posted by: chrenson on September 25, 2008 at 11:53 AM | PERMALINK

The question is, does Sarah Palin weigh the same as a duck?

Posted by: Stefan on September 25, 2008 at 11:53 AM | PERMALINK

spare us the unfounded indignation, please. - doubtful

Next time you quote colonpowwow, could you do me a favor and translate his jibberish first. Thsnks.

Posted by: Danp on September 25, 2008 at 11:55 AM | PERMALINK

Who cares if she believes in separation of church or state? An adult who believes in witchcraft does not think rationally and should not be trusted to do so.

Posted by: jls on September 25, 2008 at 11:56 AM | PERMALINK

This fixation on witches is, at its root, no different from George Bush's safe Methodist Manichaean belief that he represents good against the forces of evil. Okay, it's a little scarier to have a VP candidate who sees Satan at work in the world, but the witch thing is a small part of it.

But it's wrong to attribute this to Kenyan culture, the way that SteveC does. I attended an Assembly of God church in the early 1970s where they distributed Jack Chick's booklet that focused on the Satanic threat that "Bewitched" posed (along with astrology, drugs and the counterculture in general). This is the culture that Palin grew up in.

Posted by: Henry on September 25, 2008 at 11:57 AM | PERMALINK

The really bad news is that something like one-third of American voters will probably think this makes Palin MORE QUALIFIED for high office.

Posted by: allbetsareoff on September 25, 2008 at 12:00 PM | PERMALINK

Sara Palin, Michael Palin

Coincidence?????? I think not.

More and more the McCain/Palin team is like a Monty Python skit.

Posted by: David on September 25, 2008 at 12:00 PM | PERMALINK

The last I heard, witches were to be thrown in the town pond.

Posted by: Bob M on September 25, 2008 at 12:01 PM | PERMALINK

People, let's not forget there is a sizeable sub-culture in our country that believes Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings are satanic, that rock music contains backwards messages, that Disney films contain pornography aimed at peverting children, that some corporate logos contain the Mark of the Beast, etc etc.

Posted by: Speed on September 25, 2008 at 12:04 PM | PERMALINK

Lets see, if she weighs the same as a duck she must therefore float, and if she floats she must be a witch?

Posted by: jls on September 25, 2008 at 12:05 PM | PERMALINK

And poor Thomas Eagleton was condemned for concealing his mental health issues!

This woman is a unmedicated lunatic, right up there with snake-handlers, voodoo practitioners, and those who see the Shroud of Turin in toast.

At least Eagleton sought help.

Posted by: MissMudd on September 25, 2008 at 12:08 PM | PERMALINK

An adult who believes in witchcraft does not think rationally and should not be trusted to do so.

How about an adult who believe in angels, or that virgins can give birth, or that there's an otherworldy sky-being intensely concerned with his or her sex life?

Not that I'm in any way defending Palin, but just pointing out that belief in bizarre and irrational things pervades our society. It's just that if you can get enough people to believe the same crazy things you do, it's labeled "religion" and not mental illness.

Posted by: Stefan on September 25, 2008 at 12:11 PM | PERMALINK

Again, watch the WHOLE video, where Muthee talks about the 'seven areas of transformation":

1) the Church -- boilerplate

2) the economy -- where he calls for 'good Christian believers -- bankers' to take over the system so we 'will not have the corruption we have today'

3)politics -- We must do more than pray -- 'if believers had not done something, your President would not be in office today' plus how good it is that we have Sarah

4)education -- 'we would not have the Ten Commandments kicked out of the schools today' and we need Christians in our education, preaching in the schools, so we would not have kids taught to work with Buddha, with Mohammed. (This might be the scariest of all, as he repeats "Is anybody hearing me" and you know how much more he is saying than what he is saying)

5)media -- We need believers in the media, we need God taking over the media, we need 'our living church' right in Hollywood

6)and the last area (he doesn't count well) is the area of government -- we need believers there, we need born again Christians there (he paricularly mentions the Secretary of State), we need people who are serious with God

THEN we get the section where Sarah is brought on and prayed over, and the witchcraft is mentioned.

But like so many stories about Palin, the headline only tells the least important part of the story.

Posted by: Prup (aka Jim Benton) on September 25, 2008 at 12:19 PM | PERMALINK

Danp

In light of your comment, I went and reread my post.

It's not unclear in any way what I'm saying. It's a parody of witchcraft based on an earlier Benen post today. Perhaps next time I'll type slower so even you can understand.

Posted by: colonpowwow on September 25, 2008 at 12:19 PM | PERMALINK

This is actually not uncommon in the Evangelical/Pentacostal crowd: they're big on "rebuking" demons, devils, Satan, witches, you name it.
Posted by: Speed

True. I've seen them "cast out" the devils of bad breath. Seriously.

That's Just What I Said

Posted by: Dale on September 25, 2008 at 12:22 PM | PERMALINK

I grew up an ELCA Lutheran.

When I moved to California, I started attending a Vinyard church (Vinyards broke off of the Pentacostal movement).

They reserved the speaking in tongues for the special "sunday night service" - and most of the time, that was kept under wraps by and large, for most of the church members.

I had been going to that church for about a year, and I went to one of these special sunday night services once; and witnessed the speaking in tongues.

In my opinion, this practice is a bunch of BS. I'd even say it's blasphemous. These people want the Holy Spirit working in them so badly, they're delusional, and they go ahead and spout random noises from their mouths and call it "sacrament". There's no scriptural backing for this - only a few exceptional examples mentioned, and not in the context of weekly worship service and fellowship. It's just a show, a cheap "magic" stunt to impress the gullible. It is a completely selfish act, and has nothing to do with worship, or service in the name of the Lord.

Needless to say, it had the opposite effect on my. I was completely turned off on what I had thought was a very open, positive church, with a devoted and expressive membership.

My family now attends Methodist services.

Posted by: osama_been_forgotten on September 25, 2008 at 12:22 PM | PERMALINK

Does this mean Palin would wrap drapes around any nude statuary in the White House?

No, but she'll add four-inch spike heels, pageant hair and glasses with plain glass lenses to 'em.

Posted by: shortstop on September 25, 2008 at 12:27 PM | PERMALINK

Guess Muthee forgot to exorcise the demon of stupidity while he was at it.

Posted by: SocraticGadfly on September 25, 2008 at 12:31 PM | PERMALINK

My family now attends Methodist services.

Is there no depth you won't sink too??? For god's sakes, you may as well just host nightly orgies on your front lawn.

Posted by: Stefan on September 25, 2008 at 12:32 PM | PERMALINK

So how come the mainstream media and networks on your side of the pond are not demanding to know if the VP candidate supports the 'invasion of God into7 areas of American life' and that God should 'take over the media'?

Posted by: Tim Marshall. London on September 25, 2008 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

So how come the mainstream media and networks on your side of the pond are not demanding to know if the VP candidate supports the 'invasion of God into7 areas of American life' and that God should 'take over the media'?

Posted by: Tim Marshall. London on September 25, 2008 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

Hi. So how come the networks on your side of the pond are not asking the VP candidate if she supports the pastors views on taking over the media?

Posted by: Tim Marshall. London on September 25, 2008 at 1:01 PM | PERMALINK

A song for the current vice presidential moment

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZeWrDnXDyI

Posted by: slanted tom on September 25, 2008 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

John McCain, to the chagrin of his party, threw a gutterball when he selected that ridiculous creature from Alaska as his running mate. The Senator from Arizona who - for better or worse - can't tell a Baptist from a snake-handler, doesn't know what he has on his hands. Mayor Palin belongs to the "Dominionist" movement, a cult whose "support" for Israel is highly suspect (the Jews must be gathered in Israel for the Coming of Christ, who will then "perfect" them as Christians). We'd likewise be interested in her position vis-a-vis the infamous 13th forgery known as "Revelation 2:9." McCain's obvious ignorance of these matters has alienated a sizable portion of both the Orthodox and Reform Jewish communities. He had a clear opportunity to nominate the young congressman from Richmond, Eric Cantor, but chose instead to align himself with the sketchy Governor from Alaska, a lady who once tried to ban the teen classic "I Capture the Castle" from her local library. McCain's choice wasn't simply an insult to Jews, but to thoughtful Gentiles as well. Let's hope that he realizes his error before it's too late.

Posted by: Matthew Anger on September 25, 2008 at 1:13 PM | PERMALINK

Maybe witchcraft is causing global warming.

Posted by: Ross Best on September 25, 2008 at 1:23 PM | PERMALINK

osama been forgotten:
Mrs. Slanted Tom, a daily bible reader, and I watched this yesterday. Every other word out of her mouth was, "That's blasphemy!". So you're not the only one that feels that way. There's probably plenty more in these red states.

Posted by: slanted tom on September 25, 2008 at 1:27 PM | PERMALINK

For the sake of fairness (a virtue that distinguishes us Dems from the other party), a couple points on caution and cultural context: (1) it's the pastor who denounces withchcraft, not Palin; and (2) That the pastor is Kenyan is crucial. In Africa, Christian missionaries (who are legion) label the traditional religions "witchcraft." Posted by: SteveC

None of this matters because we are in the 21st Century. Even the Catholics gave up on witchcraft about three centuries ago.

There is no cutting someone slack on nonsense like this, particularly someone who might end up VP of the U.S. This is exactly the kind of shit that gives Europeans the vapors and what makes us look like jackasses when we criticize some of the "godless" ways of Islam.

Posted by: Jeff II on September 25, 2008 at 1:29 PM | PERMALINK

I like to think that millions of Americans right now are thinking, "Hey wait a minute. I liked George Bush at first too, didn't I?"

Posted by: Stephen Stralka on September 25, 2008 at 1:39 PM | PERMALINK

I guess I'm even more comfortable than Andrew Sullivan, because I don't care about this. For one thing, I'm tired of hearing stories about people's pastors. For another, it really doesn't bother me that her pastor lays hands on her and prays for the witches to go away. It doesn't bother me that politicians pray to a wizard in the sky, or pretend to do so. If the pastor were laying on hands and praying for the Flying Spaghetti Monster to come and guide her way to the White House, it wouldn't bother me either. We're all crazy, it's just a given.

And if the Flying Spaghetti Monster actually showed up that would be quite a story.

Posted by: Algernon on September 25, 2008 at 1:59 PM | PERMALINK

Eerie similarities between Palin as a "Wired" politician in 2005 and 2008.

2005
Wasilla Pentecostal Preacher:
“That’s what I came to know. There are people who are wired to politics, because God wants to take the political dimensions of our societies and those people should be prayed for. That is why I was so glad to see Sarah here. We should pray for her. We should back her up, and come the day of voting, we should be there. Not just praying, we should be there. And I am saying this because that is what I am telling our church. I am telling them that we need the politicians in here, what you call congressmen, you know the governors. We need the brethren right inside there.”

2008
GIBSON: And you didn't say to yourself, "Am I experienced enough? Am I ready? Do I know enough about international affairs? Do I -- will I feel comfortable enough on the national stage to do this?"
PALIN: I didn't hesitate, no.
GIBSON: Didn't that take some hubris?
PALIN: I -- I answered him yes because I have the confidence in that readiness and knowing that you can't blink, you have to be wired in a way of being so committed to the mission, the mission that we're on, reform of this country and victory in the war, you can't blink.
So I didn't blink then even when asked to run as his running mate.

Posted by: Jim on September 25, 2008 at 3:07 PM | PERMALINK
Meanwhile, what's the difference between Sarah Palin and Tammy Faye Baker?

The amount of lipstick.

Two things: Fake lashes and MASCARA

Posted by: charlotte on September 25, 2008 at 3:32 PM | PERMALINK

In the interest of accuracy, it should be noted that Muthee is a visitor to the church, not one of the regular pastors. Not that this makes the prayer-fest any less weird...

Posted by: MadMad on September 25, 2008 at 4:00 PM | PERMALINK

Steve C: "That the pastor is Kenyan is crucial. In Africa, Christian missionaries (who are legion) label the traditional religions "witchcraft.""

Thanks for your input, Steve.

I do think this is a much more serious issue though, as women branded as witches are apparently 1) driven from their communities, 2) killed, or anything in between. That is from Clarence Page, political writer/TV pundit. This seems to go with the severe good/evil mindset of these people.

As for myself (a liberal Christian), hearing the words "Jesus" and "witches" in the same sentence sends cold chills down my spine.

Posted by: Hannah on September 25, 2008 at 5:00 PM | PERMALINK

Algernon;
I too think her religion should not be an issue.But please consider the attacks on Obama over Jerimiah Wright.Consider Muthees boasting about labeling someone a witch who refused to join his church! Consider his inciting a mob to not only persecute her but run her out of town. Consider his sermons encouraging Christians to violence.Consider please that he is proud of this behavior and lastly consider that Sarah heard these sermons and condones that behavior by praising Muthee. Praying her into the governors office. And lastly consider the "Amen" at the end of his prayer over her which included the protection from witches; "Amen" means I agree

Posted by: incognitotd on September 26, 2008 at 7:12 PM | PERMALINK




 

 

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