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Tilting at Windmills

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April 14, 2009

THEY'RE GOING TO NEED A LOT MORE TEA BAGS.... As April 15 approaches, this is generally the time most Americans are inclined to complain about paying Uncle Sam. It's supposed to be as American as apple pie -- we all think we're paying too much in taxes.

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At least, that's what we've been led to believe. The latest survey from Gallup shows these assumptions don't seem to apply right now: "A new Gallup Poll finds 48% of Americans saying the amount of federal income taxes they pay is 'about right,' with 46% saying 'too high' -- one of the most positive assessments Gallup has measured since 1956. Typically, a majority of Americans say their taxes are too high, and relatively few say their taxes are too low."

The same poll found that 61% of Americans believe the income taxes they paid this year are "fair."

This certainly isn't the kind of public opinion landscape Republicans were hoping for. In order for conservative talking points on the economy to be effective, Americans have to believe the current tax rates are never "about right" and anything but "fair." Broad satisfaction with taxes leaves Republicans with very little else to say.

Indeed, the semi-official slogan of the Tea Baggers' events tomorrow is "T.E.A.: Taxed Enough Already." It was hard enough to make this argument shortly after the president signed the largest middle-class tax cut in history; it's even harder in light of poll results like these.

You can't have a "red scare" when Americans aren't terrified of socialism, and you can't mount a tax revolt if Americans think current rates are reasonable.

Steve Benen 9:45 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (45)

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Comments

It's almost like Americans are growing up all of a sudden.

Posted by: Jay on April 14, 2009 at 9:44 AM | PERMALINK

There is no intention of raising a popular revolt. Fat cats don't need it - they already have Congress in their pockets. These demonstrations are just political cover for more tax breaks for the rich, such as elimination of the estate tax.

Posted by: skeptonomist on April 14, 2009 at 9:51 AM | PERMALINK

It was hard enough to make this argument shortly after the president signed the largest middle-class tax in history

Is that supposed to be "largest middle-class tax CUT in history"?

Posted by: Elbows on April 14, 2009 at 9:51 AM | PERMALINK

Wasn't sure what this graph represented at first look, but it does seem to have some relationship to teabagging.

Posted by: ericfree on April 14, 2009 at 10:00 AM | PERMALINK

I think you've got your numbers reversed: the chart shows that 48% think their taxes are too high, and 46% think they're about right, while your text says the opposite.


Posted by: Nanuq on April 14, 2009 at 10:02 AM | PERMALINK

IIRC, there wasn't a big popular desire for tax cuts in 2000 either

Posted by: Snarki, child of Loki on April 14, 2009 at 10:06 AM | PERMALINK

It was hard enough to make this argument shortly after the president signed the largest middle-class tax in history;

someone above already caught this, but it does undermine the most effective argument against the teabaggers.

Posted by: Allan Snyder on April 14, 2009 at 10:17 AM | PERMALINK

Nanuq is correct - You have the numbers reversed. However, interesting that the last time the two figures were so close was in the early days of the Kennedy Administration. The right loves to throw the Kennedy tax cuts helping the economy at the left - So, why, following those cuts, did the "too high" start upward? The tax cuts were not perceived by the general public because of the media?

Posted by: berttheclock on April 14, 2009 at 10:22 AM | PERMALINK

As a self-employed person about to give Uncle Sam my savings account, paying 45% on taxable income, I can honestly say I feel horribly over-taxed, mentally and physically.

My story is like many others. The company my husband works for began "contracting" the labor of salaried employees, removing the cost of benefits and co-pays on FICA. So, no health insurance (and no way possible can we afford private insurance!) and curtailed wages. We're barely scraping by on pre-tax wages.

These days the talk around the coffee table is how much living in America sucks, how we wish we were Swedish or Danish, but instead had the bad luck of being Born in the USA.

Posted by: becca on April 14, 2009 at 10:33 AM | PERMALINK

T.E.A.

Taxes Empower Ambitions.

Posted by: burro on April 14, 2009 at 10:34 AM | PERMALINK

If Steve has the numbers reversed, then so does Gallup, as the numbers in the post are given in a quote from them. Notice on the graph that the light green line is actually slightly above the dark green at the very end, meaning the higher number (48%) is the percentage that responded "about right."

Posted by: ibid on April 14, 2009 at 10:37 AM | PERMALINK

The 'tea-baggers' are nothing but a bunch of shirkers trying to get out of paying their fair share of taxes.

They're always so worked up about 'hand-outs'. Someone should tell them, it's only a 'hand-out' when you take all the government services you can get (roads, schools, military) but aren't willing to pay for them.

That's not George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. That's Leona Helmsley and Billy the Kid.

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 10:43 AM | PERMALINK

However, I think lots of Americans would be more against the capital-gains tax break if they understood how phony it was (see http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/09/opinion/09brown.html?_r=1 by Dorothy Brown), as well as child deductions and tax credits for incomes to around 80k (which mean childless folks making say 30k subsidize richer ones over and above funding for schools etc.)

tyrannogenius

Posted by: Neil B ♪ on April 14, 2009 at 10:47 AM | PERMALINK

ibid, kudos to your microscope and excellent vision.

Posted by: berttheclock on April 14, 2009 at 10:52 AM | PERMALINK

It's not surprising that few people would select "taxes are too low" as their choice...even thought plenty of the RICH (if they had a conscience) SHOULD respond that way (especially the Christian wingnuts)...but IMHO "Real Americans" should feel privileged to be making incomes that allow for them to give to their government a particular level of payment that shows their success. Happily I was raised by people who although not THRILLED with paying taxes understood it was the price of being an AMERICAN@ Like my much wealthier professional brother-in-law who recognizes that when he has to pay MORE taxes he is making more money...the issue SHOULD be how those taxes are doled out...and therein we might have a meaningful debate...were that possible! BTW when do we get the list of incomes for those in our MEDIA...I see that politicians, artists, entertainers, sports figures, CEO's, schoolteachers, etc are held up for scrutiny...but WHERE OR WHERE are the FAUX New/CNN/MSNBC folks and their earningss????

Posted by: Dancer on April 14, 2009 at 10:58 AM | PERMALINK

The other interesting thing about this is how this is only the second time ever that "about right" beat out "too high."

Then again, if you consider the tax rates at the time compared to what people thought of them at the time, you can see there's no shortage of partisanship and hammering over "taxes taxes taxes" anyway.

Posted by: Nautilator on April 14, 2009 at 11:01 AM | PERMALINK

"As a self-employed person about to give Uncle Sam my savings account, paying 45% on taxable income, I can honestly say I feel horribly over-taxed, mentally and physically...The company my husband works for began "contracting" the labor of salaried employees, removing the cost of benefits and co-pays on FICA. So, no health insurance (and no way possible can we afford private insurance!) and curtailed wages. We're barely scraping by on pre-tax wages."

Two observations about this comment--

First, like most Americans, this lady is ignorant of how much she actually pays in taxes. There's no way in hell that she's "paying 45% in taxable income". As a self-employed person, her highest possible income tax rate is 35 percent, and she pays lower rates on lower portions of her income (after deducting her business expenses). If, as she claims, she's barely scraping by on pre-tax wages, then her actual (effective) income tax rate (total taxes/total income) is likely below 10 or 15 percent max (e.g. My household is in the 25 percent tax bracket and our effective income tax rate is 13.65 percent--that's with no children and no itemized deductions). Otherwise--she earns enough money to do more than "scrape by" (obviously, if she's self-employed, then she has to pay the employers' share of her SS/Medicare taxes on top of that percentage--).

Second, if her husbands company has begun "contracting" the labor of salaried employees, there's a good possibility that, like many employers, they're breaking the law. Some employers think that they have a choice about whether to give an employee a W-2 or 1099. The don't. If their workers are employees, as defined by tax code, then the employer must pay the employer's share of payroll taxes or break the law and take their chances on some pretty sizable penalties.

Posted by: CJ on April 14, 2009 at 11:12 AM | PERMALINK

Some employers think that they have a choice about whether to give an employee a W-2 or 1099. They don't. If their workers are employees, as defined by tax code, then the employer must pay the employer's share of payroll taxes or break the law and take their chances on some pretty sizable penalties.

That's a good point -- major corporations, including Microsoft, got themselves into serious trouble with the federal government because they tried to claim that their employees were really contractors even though they didn't fit the legal definition of contractors. There are specific conditions you have to meet in order to issue a 1099. It might be worth making a few discreet inquiries at the Department of Labor.

Also, becca, I know it's too late for 2008's taxes, but make an appointment with a tax professional ASAP. I guarantee you that you're missing out on a lot of ways to save on your taxes if you're getting socked with a huge bill at the end of the year.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on April 14, 2009 at 11:20 AM | PERMALINK

Hang on, I was wrong -- it's not too late to do something about this year's tax bill. You have 3 years to file an amended tax return. Head off to see a tax professional, stat.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on April 14, 2009 at 11:22 AM | PERMALINK

Fascinating chart. Probably very related to how progressive the income tax system has become (e.g. 50% of households pay in aggregate no income tax, 20% of households pay 80% of all income taxes).

Perhaps the bush tax cuts were a giant strategic blunder for the Republicans. They cut rates for high and low brackets, simultaneously (a) reducing the absolute and per capita taxes for the rich, while at the same time (b) decreased the share of income taxes paid by the less rich.

As a result, huge swaths of people don't see "taxes" as a compelling issue because they don't pay very much in income taxes.

Posted by: jmk on April 14, 2009 at 11:31 AM | PERMALINK

The Tea Baggers want their taxes lower but also want a military at their beck and call, want a huge military industrial complex, yell and scream about cuts to the things like star wars, the F22 and other such expensive item's but WHO do they expect to pay for those things??? They really do dwell in the valley of stupidity.

Posted by: redrover on April 14, 2009 at 11:35 AM | PERMALINK

Just want to tell the Obamas that tea bags are wonderful to add to the compost for their vegetable garden!

Posted by: Mari on April 14, 2009 at 11:39 AM | PERMALINK

I do know people who are struggling with taxes; small business owners who aren't making a ton of money, and are also hit with reduced work: less income in the first place and then paying the matching FICA. Having to match FICA means that that tax hits you at 15.4%, not 7.65% as it does people who are simply employees. The IRS does give you some small breaks on that, but it's still more money out the door.

Agree that some companies treating their employees as contractors is a problem and illegal. IIRC there was a war profiteering company that was doing that to their overseas American employees. People were shocked when they realized they had all those additional taxes to pay.

That said, we need tax monies for the public good. But used in a responsible manner and for purposes that enhance our lives, not just thrown at useless or harmful projects. Obama is on the right track.

Posted by: Me on April 14, 2009 at 12:06 PM | PERMALINK

I have already defeated the tea-baggers and their dysfunctional T.E.A. tactic with my wonderfully-glorious (or would that be gloriously-wonderful) super-secret weapon, known as T.R.A.P.:

Tax Refund Already Pocketed.

A new roof for the garage (installed by a qualified Democratic roofer; none of those fly-by-night, Joe-the-plumber Rethug types need apply), some serious landscaping work in the back yard (I'll do it myself, because ALL the landscapers in this Beckish burg-of-a-town are Republicans), and the rest goes into whatever else we might need to do over the next 12 months, and into savings.

Posted by: S.Waybright on April 14, 2009 at 12:09 PM | PERMALINK

Actually, one of the striking things to me about this graph are the major break points. Hostility to paying taxes rose sharply in the late Sixties--hmmmmmmmm, wonder what was going on then? Then one sees a comparably sharp drop right after 9/11--that suggests to me that Americans are much more willing to pay taxes if they see it as an act of solidarity and commmon purpose, rather than as a ripoff to pay for immoral wars and/or welfare payments to the "undeserving" [Not the same people of course, but they were all there at the same time in the 1960s]. Such was certainly the case when I was growing up in the 1950s and early 1960s; the marginal rates were much, much higher then, but at the height of the Cold War, and with WWII still vivid in popular memory, there was a greater understanding that taxes were essential to maintaining the "American Way of Life." In that regard, it might be suggestive to note that the era of hostility to taxes roughly brackets the era of baby-bbomer ascendancy; My Generation indeed has a lot to answer for.

Posted by: David in Nashville on April 14, 2009 at 12:16 PM | PERMALINK

Hard for people to think they're taxed too much when almost 50% of the workforce doesn't pay federal income taxes. Free rides at the expense of your neighbor are very popular...

Posted by: Adam on April 14, 2009 at 12:16 PM | PERMALINK

Don't forget the 3% of "Too Low" people. With them included, it's a majority against "Too High."

And which of the lucky-ducky free ride folks would you like to change places with, Adam?

Posted by: tamiasmin on April 14, 2009 at 12:36 PM | PERMALINK

Pittsburgh has been blessed with two "tea party" events this week-- one this past Saturday and one this Wednesday. If I hadn't been sick in bed on Saturday I would have gone, Ambassador Alan Keyes was there! Wheee!!! Local tv news (non-fox) coverage said that many people were there to protest the new increase in taxes on cigarettes-- even referring to it as a "tax and tobacco" party. Although in a few short moments they interviewed people who openly hated Obama, talked about how much they hate taxes, showed a few people in Uncle Sam costumes. Didn't seem all that impressive or interesting, they had the protest in an area that has many passerbys, no car traffic whatsoever. Their message isn't clear or unified and isn't coming across. If I didn't know about the tea parties in the first place I wouldn't have known what to make of the local tv coverage of Saturday's event.

The protest tomorrow is in a downtown square and will probably draw small crowds on the one day that people are extra cranky about taxes-- April 15th. Although I really think that the cigarette tax increase will draw more people than anything else, as there are a lot of smokers in Pittsburgh, sadly.

Posted by: zoe kentucky in pittsburgh on April 14, 2009 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

I'm self-employed. So it's pretty clear to me that anyone who has to empty out their savings to pay last year's taxes by tomorrow's deadline ISN'T DOING IT RIGHT. It means they're not paying estimated quarterly taxes through the year, they're putting it all off to pay it all at once, which will likey incur penalities as well. Of course that's painful, but that is a CHOICE they have made by not taking care of it through the year. Sounds like someone needs to get themselves to a CPA, they don't know what they're doing and are making it more painful than it needs to be.

I'll agree that part of the pain of being self-employed is having to pay 15% for SS/Medicare-- no employer to kick in for half of it. However, what you pay is deductable. Also anyone who is self-employed gets A TON of deductions for their home office-- imagine being able to deduct a percentage of all your house bills, mortgage, car, computers, etc.

No one loves paying taxes, but responsible adults realize it's what you pay so that we have roads to drive on, free schools open to all children, police to call on, fire departments, etc. Anyone who really hates taxes should move to Alabama. They have ridiculously low taxes-- no real estate taxes, they pay for their education via sales taxes. Which means what is hurting the most in Alabama during the recession? Their education budgets are being gutted, last I heard Birmingham was near bankruptcy. That's what not paying enough taxes gets you-- not enough money to pay for the things that people need.

Posted by: zoe kentucky in pittsburgh on April 14, 2009 at 1:19 PM | PERMALINK

"I'll agree that part of the pain of being self-employed is having to pay 15% for SS/Medicare..."

That's bad but the money's going directly to some senior that the person is related to. Furthermore, it insures that the person in question will be able to take advantage of the program once they get to that age.

In general, these 'tea-baggers' just refuse to acknowledge that this money is going to legitimate causes. That's why they say it's all going to 'aliens' or ACORN or -- blast from the past -- wasted on 'welfare queens'.

The fact that they may have benefited from it themselves -- and in a big way -- never occurs to them.

There's very little we ask of people in this society. Paying taxes for the benefits they receive often is the only requirement. Yet these tea-baggers aren't even ready to do that. I don't know what you call it, but it's not American.

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 2:46 PM | PERMALINK

The Tea Parties began as an immediate response to the passage of the stimulous bill.

Not taxes.

Spending.

Spending trillions of dollars without ever reading the bill itself (there was not physically time for anyone to read the whole thing so obviously no one did). Not only was it not read by those who passed it, it wasn't deliberated over or winnowed during the legislative process. In essence, there was no legislative process. A rather pithy early Tea Party poster read...

"No Legislation without Deliberation."

An obvious reference to "No taxation without representation" and showing the genesis of the Tea Parties. Because one thing is sure... SOMEBODY is going to pay for that monstrosity.

While some of those enthusiastic about the Tea Parties and Tax Revolt might be looking at the here and now, most are thinking of the future.

When the bill comes due.

Posted by: Synova on April 14, 2009 at 3:28 PM | PERMALINK

you can't mount a tax revolt if Americans think current rates are reasonable.

According to the graph, a majority of Americans thought that the taxes were too high during the Clinton years. They are now just about right (for approximately the same number who think they are too high), because of the Bush tax cuts. The Bush tax cuts are set to expire, so now is the perfect timing for a tax revolt: it's to remind the Democrats (or threaten them) that they'll lose their majority in Congress if they allow the tax rates to return to the levels of the Clinton years.

Thank you for a very timely graph. When the Tea Partiers see it, they will be encouraged. Show it to the Blue Dog Democrats and I think that you might get a different reaction.

Posted by: MatthewRMarler on April 14, 2009 at 3:39 PM | PERMALINK

redrover said...

"The Tea Baggers want their taxes lower but also want a military at their beck and call, want a huge military industrial complex, yell and scream about cuts to the things like star wars, the F22 and other such expensive item's but WHO do they expect to pay for those things???"

And where are EITHER of those items in the Obama budget? Not only will taxes be raised, but NEITHER of those things will survive Obama's budget priorities (he has already stated the need to cut both), if he gets his way. I don't feel like paying for something that we won't receive. And where is anyone asking to have their tax lowered? They are objecting to having their taxes raised, and for no good reason. If you have the extra cash to throw around, and you don't care how it gets spent, have at it.

Leo said...

"In general, these 'tea-baggers' just refuse to acknowledge that this money is going to legitimate causes. "

Such as? It sure isn't defense (the only federal government department looking at ACTUAL budget cuts). Porkulus? Most of that money won't even be spent this year, by which time we may or may not be out of the recession. The Budget priorities of Health Care and Energy (which have NOTHING to do with the current financial crisis)? We don't acknowledge these causes as legitimate because they aren't.

Leo also said...

"Paying taxes for the benefits they receive often is the only requirement. Yet these tea-baggers aren't even ready to do that".

Those tea-baggers aren't ready to spend MORE, especially when the line-items on which their tax dollars will be spent a) are proven non-starters, and b) will saddle future generations with far more debt than Bush 43 at his profligate worst.

Neither of the numbers I saw in this article indicated that people thought their taxes were too low. You want to debate the merits of the spending? Fine. How about discussing the means by which we will pay it all off? Great. But the idea that nearly half the country (which objects to what they see as throwing money down a rathole and mortgaging future generations for the privilege) is somehow "not American" is both dishonest and misleading.

Posted by: HobbesDFW on April 14, 2009 at 3:45 PM | PERMALINK

"But the idea that nearly half the country (which objects to what they see as throwing money down a rathole and mortgaging future generations for the privilege) is somehow "not American" is both dishonest and misleading."

Actually it's running around using the backdrop of our country's forefathers -- all in the name of not paying your fair share in taxes that's "both dishonest and misleading."

What's more, it doesn't fool anyone.

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 3:57 PM | PERMALINK

"...all in the name of not paying your fair share in taxes..."

An impressive 2-for-1: a meme that provides both a strawman argument and a catchy ad hominem attack. No wonder you keep repeating it. That, and your inability to contradict the basic point the protestors are making.

Posted by: HobbesDFW on April 14, 2009 at 4:29 PM | PERMALINK

It's so interesting to watch people suddenly discover patriotism... which apparently means paying a "fair share" of taxes, whatever someone else decides those taxes to be, in order to pay for benefits, no matter who decided those benefits were necessary. All that is required is that something be a "good cause" and it simply can not be criticized.

There is no end to what other people think is the best use for your money.

The next "best use" will be to pay the bill for the stimulous when it comes due. And it will. No doubt, when that happens, every one of our children will pay their "fair share" of that "good cause."

It matters not at all that criticizing the stimulous bill for not even pretending to focus spending on things that will actually stimulate the economy will be criticized as an unpatriotic hatred of those people the money would have helped. It matters not at all that the entire concept seems to be to throw as much money in all directions and hope that some portion of it *sticks* to something so that our children are able to pay the bill when it comes due.

There will be no discussion of how we're going to pay it off.

There will be no discussion of the measure by which any specific project is going to stimulate the economy.

Such things are "unpatriotic."

Posted by: Synova on April 14, 2009 at 4:47 PM | PERMALINK

"It's so interesting to watch people suddenly discover patriotism... "

Hey, I was born patriotic! And I know enough not to use national symbols for narrow political purposes -- a lesson your side has never learned (not that anyone is listening to you any more).

Democracy sucks, huh? I'm lovin' it.

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 4:52 PM | PERMALINK

And there will be NO discussion of how stimulous spending will actually stimulate the economy.

And there will be NO discussion of how and WHO will pay it off.

All there will be is snide, crude allusions to homosexuals (tea bagging), because that is considered a clever way to speak of those who actually are concerned with such "unpatriotic" things as government spending without any deliberation, oversight, or pretense of reading the bill, and who are actually concerned with such "unpatriotic" things as who will pay the bill when it comes due.

Who's child is going to pay *your* share of the bill, leo?

Posted by: Synova on April 14, 2009 at 6:05 PM | PERMALINK

Synova -

I don't know about leo, but my kid is stuck paying off a goddamn useless war that hasn't done us a lick of good. Actually he's stuck paying off the massive debt that Reagan got us into that Bush Jr. didn't want to let us pay off and gave the top 2% a tax cut with the money instead, so I guess my great-grandkid or maybe my great-great-grandkid will be paying off your goddamn war. Meanwhile we're trying to fix the goddamn economy that your side screwed up for the last 30 years, so shut up and get out of the way.

Come back to me with your cries of "generational theft" when you turn your ass around, look at the last 30+ years of American idiocy and realize who the thieves actually were/are and who they were stealing from. The last 8 years are only the most visible example of it.

I'm so sick of whiny, over-entitled Republicans who think they should get EVERYTHING they want and screw everyone else. You unpatriotic fools make me ill. I don't understand how you can look in a mirror every morning. How can you live with yourselves?

Posted by: NonyNony on April 14, 2009 at 6:18 PM | PERMALINK

Democracy doesn't suck, Leo - in fact, we love it. In this country, it's how we correct mistakes - just as we did in 1980 and 1994, and just as we will in 2010.

Posted by: HobbesDFW on April 14, 2009 at 6:18 PM | PERMALINK

Fix the economy *how* Nony?

Explain how this is going to fix the economy? Because you WILL get your way. You will. Not that anyone has a clue how this will actually help the economy or how even *greater* debt is going to correct past spending.

No one knows.

It's a matter of faith that the government can save us and you WILL get your way.

Now, wanting to get your way AND wanting not to have to listen to dissent (which is suddenly not patriotic anymore, no matter that dissent was the highest form of patriotism just a short while ago) isn't something that is going to happen or that you even have a right to expect.

Why are the rules different for other people? Suddenly everyone who disagrees is just supposed to Shut Up. Dissenting voices should Shut Up. People shouldn't have protests and sing songs and try to get their voices heard.

What's up with that?

Posted by: Synova on April 14, 2009 at 7:13 PM | PERMALINK

Problem is, taxes *are* too low.

Posted by: steveb on April 14, 2009 at 8:59 PM | PERMALINK

HobbesDFW: "Democracy doesn't suck, Leo - in fact, we love it. In this country, it's how we correct mistakes - just as we did in 1980 and 1994, and just as we will in 2010.

Hmmn, seems to be something missing here. Oh what could it be?

Kinda skipping over history, HobbesDFW, aren't ya now? The problem with your, er, prediction about 2010 is that people are still liable to remember '2000' and the wonderful mess your party/president made of our country.

Then, and this is easy, all they have to do is compare how things will be in 2010 to how things were when Bush left office -- and 2010 begins to look pretty good for progressives (and America).

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 11:04 PM | PERMALINK

Synova: "Why are the rules different for other people? Suddenly everyone who disagrees is just supposed to Shut Up. Dissenting voices should Shut Up. People shouldn't have protests and sing songs and try to get their voices heard."

Synova, we could care less whether you shut up or not. It's taking you seriously -- after all that kowtowing to wealth and power over 30 years -- that simply doesn't make sense to most Americans.

It's a question of 'been there, heard that'; the country's got more important things to do.

Posted by: leo on April 14, 2009 at 11:11 PM | PERMALINK

I enjoy your ridicule - the tea-bag protests are more of a protest about responsible government - which ours is not.

We have all been witness to the current economic debacle - and have watched while both parties fed at the trough all the way through the boom and right up until the bust. Now we watch as the gov't throws our money away - billions upon billions for failed companies, billions with no strings. 700billion, 800billion, an omibus with 9500 earmarks, a federal budget worth 3trillion... it goes on and on - both parties are equally guilty.

The tea-party movement is the beginning - the end will be a change in government. Real change.

Most protests do not allow politicans to speak. They can attend, but not speak. They need to listen.


Posted by: BlueDog on April 15, 2009 at 9:26 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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