Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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May 8, 2009

BUILDING A BRIDGE TO THE 19TH CENTURY.... These "sovereignty" resolutions in "red" states are generating a little too much support for our modern democracy. Hendrik Hertzberg takes a closer look at a stark-raving mad resolution out of Georgia.

[Georgia] has passed a resolution that mixes three parts inanity and one part prospective treason into a Kompletely Krazy Kocktail of militia-minded moonshine and wacko white lightning -- a resolution that not only endorses defiance of federal law but also threatens anarchy and revolution.

Really, you can't make this stuff up. You have to read it in full to believe it. Even then you can't believe it. You thought that "nullification" had been rendered inoperative by the Civil War? Well, think again. You considered secession a pre-Appomattox kind of thing? Well, reconsider. You assumed that John C. Calhoun was a dead parrot? Well, turns out he was only resting.

The resolution is written in a mock eighteenth-century style, ornate and pompous.... But the substance is even nuttier than the style.

The substance, if you want to call it that, delves into "nullification" theory (Georgia can nullify federal laws it doesn't like), and suggests federal gun-control laws can lead to the disbandment of the United States.

The measure passed the Georgia state Senate 43 to 1. Similar measures have been embraced by lawmakers in other states, primarily in the South, and all of this comes after the governor of Texas spoke publicly about secession. Other governors, including South Carolina's Mark Sanford, are reportedly warming up to Civil War-era ideas.

Ed Kilgore explained:

As someone just old enough to remember the last time when politicians in my home southern region made speeches rejecting the Supremacy Clause and the 14th amendment, I may take this sort of activity more seriously than some. But any way you slice it, Republicans are playing with some crazy fire. For all the efforts of its sponsors to sell the "sovereignty resolution" idea as a grassroots development flowing out of the so-called Tea Party Movement, its most avid supporters appear to be the John Birch Society and the Council of Conservative Citizens, the successor to the White Citizens Councils of ill-fame. And given the incredibly unsavory provenance of this "idea," it's no surprise that these extremist groups are viewing the "movement" as an enormous vindication of their twisted points of view.

If John C. Calhoun offered the definitive articulation of the nullification theory, his nemesis, President Andrew Jackson, offered the definitive response, which holds true today. He said the doctrine was "incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution, unauthorized by its spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed."


Steve Benen 11:15 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (59)

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Comments

So, does the federal government occupy or just let them walk?

Posted by: howie on May 8, 2009 at 11:14 AM | PERMALINK

Forget Iran, we may need to nuke Georgia! -Kevo

Posted by: kevo on May 8, 2009 at 11:16 AM | PERMALINK

This wouldn't have anything to do with the fact that Obama is black, would it?

Posted by: Alan Vanneman on May 8, 2009 at 11:17 AM | PERMALINK

Hi, i am the law of unintended consequences. I am the reason that predictions about political reality are inherently unreliable.

Really. Can anyone say how this development will play out? I mean, just wow. These folks are really playing calvinball to the extreme.

I am surprised that "Capital" has not started to rein in the crazy, notwithstanding the fact that Capital has been using the crazy as a fairly reliable voting bloc for years.

eric

Posted by: eric on May 8, 2009 at 11:17 AM | PERMALINK

What happened to "Country First" and the "pro-American parts of America?" Wow... all this after a mere 3 months of Constitutional governance.

The GOP does, indeed, bring the crazy.

-Z

Posted by: Zorro on May 8, 2009 at 11:18 AM | PERMALINK

It might make some sense if it was over slavery or religious freedom, but assault weapons? They must be drinking some really bad Kool-Aid. As a strong supporters of original intent, they should know the founders were only trying to protect our right to flint locks when they wrote the second admendment.

Posted by: J. Frank Parnell on May 8, 2009 at 11:20 AM | PERMALINK

So it turns out that all the screaming by the Republicans that liberals were unpatriotic, America-hating, traitors was simply more GOP projection. When does the Media and the Democratic party start calling this what it is - America-hating sedition by the GOP?

Today's GOP: Poster child for anti-Americanism.

Posted by: ckelly on May 8, 2009 at 11:20 AM | PERMALINK

So, when Republicans are running things in Washington it's all about being an American and being patriotic but now that they're out of power, being an American sucks and patriotism = secession. I think we can now safely conclude that these folks are about as shallow as water on a windshield. The minute one of these states nullifies a Federal law, let every dime of Federal funds stop flowing to that state immediately. EVERY DIME.

Posted by: 3reddogs on May 8, 2009 at 11:22 AM | PERMALINK

Forty-three to one!!!! I used to think that Georgia was one of the most civilized parts of the South. But only one state senator failed this insanity test? Incredible!

Posted by: Jim Strain on May 8, 2009 at 11:24 AM | PERMALINK

Where is Sherman when you need him?

Posted by: dude08 on May 8, 2009 at 11:25 AM | PERMALINK

Forgive me if this has come up already, but has anybody noticed that this talk of secession comes on the heels of the election of the first African-American president?

The Republican's Southern strategy, still in play, is called the Southern Strategy for a reason.

Incidentally, I caught this on the link below:

"Now, to be fair, the resolution passed because it was snuck unnoticed onto the Senate resolution calendar on the 39th day of the 40-day legislative session, when senators were trying to handle dozens of bills and scores of amendments. Most did not have an opportunity to read the six-page resolution, which in its description claimed to merely affirm ’states’ rights based on Jeffersonian principles."

http://www.the-peoples-forum.com/cgi-bin/readart.cgi?ArtNum=11308

Posted by: CJ on May 8, 2009 at 11:27 AM | PERMALINK

I am weary. Can we just show these people the door and be done with them? They are so tiresome and I am sick to death of hearing them whine. OUT!, OUT! Leave us now, I say.

Posted by: CDW on May 8, 2009 at 11:27 AM | PERMALINK

This is old news, people.

This little gem was slipped past the Georgia senate attached to something else back on April Fools Day. I assume that the nut-jobs who put it through were serious, in their own way, but no one has, as far as I know, paid any attention to it since its passage.

If the ghost of "States Rights" Gist starts calling for militia volunteers or if anyone sees Ashley and Scarlett having a tearful farewell on the front steps of Tara, let me know.

Until then, I've got more current right-wing weirdness to worry about.

Posted by: Midland on May 8, 2009 at 11:27 AM | PERMALINK

Why do Republicans hate America?

Posted by: mamzic on May 8, 2009 at 11:30 AM | PERMALINK

Liberty and union.
One and inseparable.
Now and forever.

Posted by: Bernard HP Gilroy on May 8, 2009 at 11:31 AM | PERMALINK

For a complete vetting of this foolishness, I recommend reading Jay Bookman's post on the subject (Jay's a brilliant editorial page columnist with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution who's work, I believe, should be more well-known outside of Georgia).

http://blogs.ajc.com/jay-bookman-blog/2009/04/16/georgia-senate-threatens-dismantling-of-usa/?cxntfid=blogs_jay_bookman_blog

Posted by: CJ on May 8, 2009 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

Thank you, State Senator Ronald Ramsey, Sr. (D) for voting against this nonsense.

Posted by: berttheclock on May 8, 2009 at 11:45 AM | PERMALINK

If the secessionists form a new political party and win a majority of legislative seats and the governorship of the state then the federal government should begin negotiations for secession.

This will probably include commitments to honor various treaties and international obligations.

After the agreement is negotiated the states should hold referendums to see if that's what the people really want.

Posted by: Carl Nyberg on May 8, 2009 at 11:48 AM | PERMALINK

This just begs for mockery and south-bashing, and there are a lot of great, funny, sarcastic things to be said.

But I have trouble doing much joking about this given my fears that this shameless pandering, which southern politicians see as costless, has so much potential for truly tragic outcomes.

There are a lot of crazies, and that craziness is exacerbated by "culture shock" type shifts and by "Falling Down"-like experiences in a sagging economy. Seccession and/or nullification talk in Texas, Oklahoma and Georgia, particularly based on theories tied to hardcore racism of an earlier time, gives legitimacy to the headcases and actually fans their flames.

This is not just idle chat: this is the raw material from which Waco, Ruby Ridge, Timothy McVeigh, hate crimes against blacks, Hispanics, and GLBTs, the New York shooter fearful his guns would be taken away, and worse likely to come are made. They hear the elected leadership of their state speak defiantly against the federal government, and they come to see themselves as wholly justified footsoldiers, valiantly and loyally defending their own people, when go go shoot some "others" - federal judges, people of a different race or religion, etc.

This is really very dangerous, and it is shameful that politicans engage in it rather than trying to put a stop to it, and even more shameful that the media is so silent and milquetoast on it, and most shameful of all that it isn't causing absolute outrage and social stigma from the rest of society that such hateful, disruptive, antagonism would come from within.

Posted by: zeitgeist on May 8, 2009 at 11:51 AM | PERMALINK

I'm with 3reddogs--not a penny more in Fed money if they nullify any Fed law. Let them live on peaches and cotton. Or maybe they can become a wall to wall gun show and we'll have to send in the army to root them out. Don't know whether to sing the Battle Hymn or Let My People Go (And Then Smack 'Em on the Head).

Posted by: Frak on May 8, 2009 at 11:54 AM | PERMALINK

I thought we settled this. Time to bring back William T. Sherman.

Posted by: Tigershark on May 8, 2009 at 11:54 AM | PERMALINK

Obviously, my ancestors didn't burn Atlanta as completely as they should. They should have ethnically cleansed the place when they could and let the patriots in the mountains (who the lowland traitors dismissively called "hillbillies") create the Free State of Nickajack like they wanted to when they fought against the traitors.

Posted by: TCinLA on May 8, 2009 at 11:56 AM | PERMALINK

OK, I know that my State Senator, who was a lawyer for Al Gore in 2000 and chaired Obama's campaign in Georgia, is not infected with this particular strain of crazy. He's actually a really good legislator. We do have a smart person or two down here, thanks very much. I even have a pair of shoes.

According to Bookman's editorial linked above, what happened was that this non-binding resolution was snuck in on the 39th day of the 40-day legislative session, when Senators had dozens of actual bills to read, revise, and vote on. Nobody read it. So don't interpret that vote count as an indication that Georgia will be leaving the union anytime soon.

Posted by: The Fabulous Mr. Toad on May 8, 2009 at 11:57 AM | PERMALINK

There is nothing surprising about this. It was obvious to anyone who cared to notice that the Tea Party protests the other day had nothing to do with fiscal policy, that it was really a primal scream by right wingers who felt like strangers in their own land and the victims of some alien occupying power. These sovereignty resolutions reflect that, as they does the deep cultural alienation felt by many on the radical right (especially in the South.) Southern politics has never matured to the extent that it is capable of participating in a diverse national democracy. It either must achieve a monopoly of power (Rove's Permanent Republican Governing Majority) or it simply separates and segregates itself whenever it loses control or fears it will lose control. The GOP is now as much the party of this Southern secessionist mindset, which Rush Limbaugh has done so much to articulate with his "good riddance and take so and so with you..." attitude to any but the far right.

On October 29, 1995 the Washington Post carried a startling op-ed piece by two Southern history professors announcing a "New Dixie Manifesto" being issued by a new group called the Southern League. Below is an exerpt of their piece, which George Will at the time wrote glowingly about.


"Here n the United States, a new group of Southerners is calling for nothing more revolutionary than home rule for the states established by the U.S.12 Constitution. The Southern League was founded in 1994 at a meeting of scholars, journalists and political activists in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

"Our members are pledged to seek the well-being and independence of the Southern people by every honorable means. Far from wishing any ill to the rest of the nation, we believe that a renewed South will be an inspiration to other regions in search of their own identities and to all Americans who wish to lead their lives in peace.

"A concern for states' rights, local self-government and regional identity used to be taken for granted everywhere in America. But the United States is no longer, as it once was, a federal union of diverse states and regions. National uniformity is being imposed by the political class that runs Washington, the economic class that owns Wall Street and the cultural class in charge of Hollywood and the Ivy League.

"The easiest way to secure home rule for Southern states is to restore the federal constitution. What had been a genuinely federal union has been turned into a multicultural, continental empire, ruled from Washington by federal agencies and under the thumb of the federal judiciary. And all this is done regardless of the party or ideology that controls the White House."

Posted by: Ted Frier on May 8, 2009 at 12:00 PM | PERMALINK

Whew! This strikes me as something that someone would write on Ritalin or Adderall(having been there).It sounds neat in the initial Ritalin-laced brain but is totally illogical, pointless, hard to read,and only means something to the people who wrote it. These folks really need adult supervision. I mean REALLY need ADULT supervision.

Posted by: Kurt on May 8, 2009 at 12:03 PM | PERMALINK

HELENA, Mont. (AP)-- Montana-made guns may form the basis for a court showdown over states’ rights if the governor signs a bill to release some firearms in the state from federal regulation.

The proposed law aims to exempt firearms, weapons components and ammunition made in Montana and kept in Montana from federal gun laws. Since the state has few gun laws of its own, the legislation would allow some gunowners and sellers in the state to skirt registration, licensing requirements and background checks entirely.

*
“We’d like to just be able to make our own guns here in Montana and have the feds stay out of it,” said Gary Marbut of the Montana Shooting Sports Association, which helped draft the bill.

The real target, though, is the U.S. Supreme Court. And Marbut and others believe they can hit that mark with a simple Montana-made youth-model single-shot bolt-action .22 rifle.

In particular, they plan to find a “squeaky clean” Montanan who wants to send a note to the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives threatening to build and sell about 20 such rifles without federal dealership licensing. If the ATF tells them it’s illegal, they will then file a lawsuit in federal court n with any luck triggering a legal battle that lands in the nation’s highest court.

House Bill 246 sailed through the Montana Legislature, but Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer has not yet offered a position on the measure, which awaits his action.

Posted by: steve duncan on May 8, 2009 at 12:15 PM | PERMALINK

Mr. Toad -

I think we share a state senator.

When I saw that he had voted for this, I immediately shot him a 'wtf?' email (he is a neighbor as well as my senator). His reply was similar to Bookman's column - that this non-binding 'sense of the senate' resolution was bundled with a bunch of other stuff that usually gets affirmative votes out of comity with the sponsors.

I didn't get the sense from his reply that he had read it, even after the fact. I did not waste the opportunity to enlighten him on the crazy.

Posted by: Jay on May 8, 2009 at 12:19 PM | PERMALINK

I'll buy the explanation that it was some sort of legislative screw-up. But there is a teeny-weeny irony in the fact that the President who prosecuted the Civil War was, after all, a Republican. Autre temps, autre moeures, as the French say.

Posted by: MattF on May 8, 2009 at 12:21 PM | PERMALINK

Didn't we whip these red-staters 150 years ago?

Oh, well, if that's what they want...

Posted by: buddy66 on May 8, 2009 at 12:21 PM | PERMALINK

Maybe we could just call Russia and tell them that there's another "Georgian Uprising" in the works. All they'll need is a good military commander named "Shermanovsky"---and those nasty little secessionists will be put in their place right quick....

Posted by: S. Waybright on May 8, 2009 at 12:22 PM | PERMALINK

"The measure passed the Georgia state Senate 43 to 1."

I take it that means it was supported by a fair number of Democratic State senators?

Do these people all get too much sun or what is wrong with them?

Posted by: SRW1 on May 8, 2009 at 12:35 PM | PERMALINK

This is old news, people.
This little gem was slipped past the Georgia senate attached to something else back on April Fools Day. I assume that the nut-jobs who put it through were serious, in their own way, but no one has, as far as I know, paid any attention to it since its passage.

Agreed, This is just recycling an old story, to keep the secession meme alive. It was interesting on 4-1-09, but ....

Nothing to see hear folks, move along.

Posted by: hopeful on May 8, 2009 at 12:38 PM | PERMALINK

oops

fix here or alternatively and hear

Posted by: hopeful on May 8, 2009 at 12:41 PM | PERMALINK

If the arc of states from South Carolina to Texas want to walk, I'm all for it. They should keep the CSA abbreviation, but this time it will stand for the Crazy States of America, at least outside their own borders.

Posted by: Jon on May 8, 2009 at 12:42 PM | PERMALINK

While it's true that many of the senators who voted for this insane resolution didn't read it, there's also Georgia Insurance Commissioner John Oxendine, a major gubernatorial candidate, who explicitly endorsed it, and is trying to make it a campaign issue. Indeed, it's the Republican politicians like Rick Perry and Oxendine who are out promoting this stuff that most alarms me. Haven't seen anything this loony from viable statewide politicians since David Duke's 1991 campaign.

Can't wait to see what Sarah Palin does with a similar resolution in Alaska, which is on her desk.

Posted by: ed kilgore on May 8, 2009 at 12:50 PM | PERMALINK

"We'd like to just be able to make our own guns here in Montana and have the feds stay out of it," said Gary Marbut of the Montana Shooting Sports Association, which helped draft the bill.

Good thing Montana has built that completely impenetrable wall around the state and put metal detectors at all of the gates that let people in and out, because otherwise this would sound like an absolute heaven for criminals who could buy their guns in Montana and then take them home to commit crimes in other states.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on May 8, 2009 at 12:59 PM | PERMALINK

"If the arc of states from South Carolina to Texas want to walk, I'm all for it."

We don't. Only some of the crazies do. But it seems like the inmates have taken over the asylum at times, and I'm not sure what to do about it. In my district, a liberal Democrat came within five points of taking our congressional seat from the Republicans for the first time in decades. There are hundreds of thousands of us just in this district who believe in a progressive future. We may be somewhat marginalized around here, but there's more of us than you think.

Posted by: Jurgan on May 8, 2009 at 1:16 PM | PERMALINK

If the geniuses at the DNCC and in Congress—not to mention Obama—had the tiniest instinct for the jugular, they would be pointedly and loudly demanding that the national Republican Party leaders take a clear public stand on these measures. If they refuse to repudiate, then the GOP should be branded as the home of treasonous secessionists who make a mockery of the sacrifice of the millions of Americans have served in the military to preserve and protect the Constitution, hundreds of thousands of them giving their last full measure while doing so. If they reject these initiatives, then it will further splinter and weaken the GOP, which can only benefit the country.

I'm not holding my breath for Reid, Pelosi, Rahm et al to get a clue, though. They don't have the guts or the imagination.

Posted by: bluestatedon on May 8, 2009 at 1:20 PM | PERMALINK

These dextronuts were complaining about whether someone wore a flag pin, and now are resisting national authority ... They can at least quit being phonies: no more US flag pins, they should wear the pin of their own State (especially if a Confederate flag is still on there), and heck, a Confederate flag pin too.

Yee-teh-haw!

Posted by: N e i l B ☺ on May 8, 2009 at 1:38 PM | PERMALINK

BTW, neosecessionists forget: the COTUS says this and that, but also that the SCOTUS interprets the law and decides ultimately what is supreme law of the land, not States - for right or wrong.

Posted by: Neil B. ♫ on May 8, 2009 at 1:41 PM | PERMALINK

Not only did Andrew Jackson have the right rhetoric when South Carolina was threatening to nullify federal laws, he also had the right response. He told Calhoun and the others supporting nullification that, should they move ahead, he would have several hundred thousand troops in Charleston within a month.

It seemed to cool the entire nullification moveement immensely.

Posted by: Ken in Tenn on May 8, 2009 at 1:46 PM | PERMALINK

Shorter GOP: "we love our guns more than our country." Good to know what's important to them.

Posted by: stefan on May 8, 2009 at 2:02 PM | PERMALINK

Jesus Christ. More talk like this and the US Army will be welcome to march through the entire South in a 1000-mile-wide swath of destruction from the Mason-Dixon to the sea. SHUT. THE. FUCK. UP. YOU. SUBHUMAN. MORONS.

We have B-52s and nuclear weapons. You keep talking about ceasing to exist a part of the United States, we'll oblige. By annihilating you.

Gah. I've had it with patrioticker-than-thou southern fuckheads.

Posted by: anonymous on May 8, 2009 at 2:09 PM | PERMALINK

Anonymous, dude. Some of us LIVE down here. Chill.

Posted by: The Fabulous Mr. Toad on May 8, 2009 at 2:13 PM | PERMALINK

Do something about it then

Posted by: anonymous on May 8, 2009 at 2:15 PM | PERMALINK

Bottom is line is once again, the GOP has nothing of substance. Incredibly superficial bunch.

Posted by: Bob M on May 8, 2009 at 2:15 PM | PERMALINK

Two things, and I'm good on Georgia leaving the Union. First, evacuate all of the sane people. Second, take all the thousands of disgruntled Blackwater troops from Iraq and put them in Georgia, thus: Anything that moves, shoot it!

Posted by: S. Waybright on May 8, 2009 at 2:41 PM | PERMALINK

Folks up North saying "let the South walk" are almost as silly as the wannabe Johnny Rebs down here wanting to secede. If you really want to let the South go, I suggest that before doing so, you'd better have the federal government dismantle all the military installations down here and bring all the nukes deployed here north of the border first - otherwise you're just asking for trouble.

Posted by: dr sardonicus on May 8, 2009 at 3:09 PM | PERMALINK
The easiest way to secure home rule for Southern states is to restore the federal constitution. What had been a genuinely federal union has been turned into a multicultural, continental empire ...

Oh noes!! Multiculturalism!! HOW WILL WE SURVIVE WITH ALL THESE NON-WHITE PEOPLE!!!11!111eleventy!!1!

A bit of joking aside, that's what this is all about -- not about gun rights, or federal over-reaching, deficits, or anything else.

These people are pissed a non-white guy is President. Period. End of discussion.

Posted by: Mark D on May 8, 2009 at 3:21 PM | PERMALINK

One other thing: The South has millions of really good, progressive-minded folks.

Yes, it'd be nice if they had a bit more power in politics and the regional dialog.

But think about it: it's only been 40-some odd years since blacks had full rights in many of these areas -- and that's after nearly 200 years of slavery, racism and bigotry. So it may take a bit more time to get things righted.

Give 'em time, folks, and let's not paint the entire area with such broad brushes.

Posted by: Mark D on May 8, 2009 at 3:24 PM | PERMALINK

I always have to laugh at the retards from states with a mere 49% crazy acting all holier-than-thou towards people in states with an overwhelming 51% crazy.

Posted by: Disputo on May 8, 2009 at 3:44 PM | PERMALINK

I'm with Mark D., Jurgan, and the other rational and patriotic Southerners who have commented here—let's concentrate our fire and ire on those traitorous Republican secessionists.

Posted by: bluestatedon on May 8, 2009 at 3:49 PM | PERMALINK

If the geniuses at the DNCC and in Congress—not to mention Obama—had the tiniest instinct for the jugular, they would be pointedly and loudly demanding that the national Republican Party leaders take a clear public stand on these measures.

It may be worth pointing out that after the 1860 election of Lincoln, 6 states actually seceded, without Lincoln (or his predecessor Buchanan) lifting a finger to stop them, until the attack on Fort Sumter.

Posted by: Disputo on May 8, 2009 at 4:09 PM | PERMALINK

So, a bunch of GA delegates didn't read a proposal and signed it...sorta like the FEDS not reading the TARP legislation and signed it anyway.

The Fed. government is/has encroched on States rights. There is a distinction on what the FEDS can do versus what State's can do, legislatively. Take gay-marriage, if one state passes it, gays can move to that state. If a state approves legal marijuana, tokers can move to that State. The Fed. Government needs to be reigned-in...not only has Bush stomped-on indiv. rights, but also Obama. Someone needs to draw the lines. Read the Constitution.

Posted by: Rainboskies on May 8, 2009 at 5:09 PM | PERMALINK

LMAO@Rainkitty

I suggest you learn the basics about how democracy works in America before you deign to lecture anyone on the USConst or States rights.

(Hint: members of a sitting legislature are not "delegates", nor do they "sign" bills or resolutions, much less "proposals".)

Posted by: Disputo on May 8, 2009 at 5:15 PM | PERMALINK

LMAO@Desperado

Okay, so I used "signed" versus "Voted/passed" and that was your comment? Vernacular? The point is this: STATES RIGHTS VERSUS FEDERAL RIGHTS are outlined in the Constitution. Somewhere, these outlined responsibilities have become skewed. It needs to be fixed.

Yes, in VA our state reps. are called delegates.

Posted by: Rainboskies on May 8, 2009 at 5:31 PM | PERMALINK

Not all of us down here voted for this bunch of idiots. As someone else said, there are more progressives down here than you might think. So be careful and don't let your regional prejudices shine too bright.

Posted by: don on May 8, 2009 at 11:26 PM | PERMALINK

It may be worth pointing out that after the 1860 election of Lincoln, 6 states actually seceded, without Lincoln (or his predecessor Buchanan) lifting a finger to stop them, until the attack on Fort Sumter.

Or, maybe . . . not. Sorry, I'm not clear on why is this relevant?

Anyhow, the important point is that anyone is legally free to leave the Union at any time, but no one is legally able to take any public property with them. If conservative Georgians want to leave the Union, they can do so as long as they don't try to take Georgia with them. I'm sure you Georgia moderates and progressives will do a fine job of running the state.

Posted by: Midland on May 8, 2009 at 11:44 PM | PERMALINK

Or, maybe . . . not.

Ah, the war cry of the slacker gen.

Sorry, I'm not clear on why is this relevant?

The pt is that I agree with the op that the Obama admin needs to take a tough stand and nip this crap in the bud. Obama's instinct for playing rope-a-dope does not works well here. Lincoln ignored the secessionists, hoping that by not provoking them they'd get it out of their system and eventually see reason, and we all know how well that worked out.

Posted by: Disputo on May 9, 2009 at 2:32 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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