Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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August 18, 2009

THEY'RE AGAINST CO-OPS, TOO.... The NYT reports today, "The White House has indicated that it could accept a nonprofit health care cooperative as an alternative to a new government insurance plan, originally favored by President Obama. But the co-op idea is so ill defined that no one knows exactly what it would look like or how effectively it would compete with commercial insurers."

It's going to be tough to rally support for an idea when it's not altogether clear what it is, or how it would work. Ezra Klein had an item noting the differences between a co-op and a public option, and concluded, "As the situation stands, there's no existing model for co-ops to follow and no policy specifics on Conrad's idea, so it's impossible to say whether, or how, they will work. I could imagine very good co-ops or totally useless ones."

But let's focus, for now, on the political side of this. After all, the very idea of a nonprofit cooperative was itself a political invention -- adding palatable competition to the system without creating a public option. Indeed, for months, Republicans said a public option would mark the fall of civilization, but a co-op alternative is entirely palatable.

But in light of signals that a genuine public option is in trouble, the Republican Party that found co-ops reasonable has decided to change course. Now, they're against co-ops, too.

The very basic logic of the public option is this: Most Democrats support a strong public option, most Republicans oppose Democratic health care reform period, so perhaps Democrats can win over a few Republicans if they keep government out of the insurance industry and create a system of privately-held health-care co-operatives instead. Simple right?

Not if the RNC has anything to say about it.

They're out today with a new release, attacking the co-op idea.... As the RNC makes clear, in their eyes, "Public option by any other name is still government-run health care."

Last night, right-wing talk-show host Mark Steyn said on Fox News that co-ops aren't different enough from the public option, adding, "[T]he whole system is in fact a kind of death panel."

The death of American political discourse notwithstanding, let's be clear about the larger debate: no matter what Democrats propose, Republicans are going to reject it, even if they've already signaled support for the same idea. Consistency and honesty are irrelevant -- the goal is to defeat health care reform, no matter what's in the bill.

As John Cole explained last night, "At some point, these folks are going to learn that no matter what happens, the Republicans are not going to vote for anything. As soon as they kill off the public option, they will pick off co-ops. Think I'm kidding? They managed to convince people that voluntarily talks with your doctor about a living will was a death panel killing grandma."

John Harwood noted on MSNBC the other day, "I gotta tell you what a White House official told me today: 'Our problem right now is, if we tell some of the Republican opponents in the Senate, 'You can have everything you want in the bill,' they still won't vote for it.'"

Yep. Republicans don't support health care reform. Weakening the bill and scuttling good ideas to garner their support doesn't make sense, since they fully intend to vote against literally any bill. Yesterday, Chuck Grassley said he's likely to vote against his own compromise package.

Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise?

Steve Benen 8:40 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (56)

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so perhaps Democrats can win over a few Republicans
"if we tell some of the Republican opponents in the Senate, 'You can have everything you want in the bill,' they still won't vote for it.'"

If nothing else good has come from the last 7 months, at the very least it should be clear to the White House that winning over even a few Republicans costs far more than it's worth. 95% of them would vote against curing cancer because they didn't want to give Obama a political win.

Posted by: Shalimar on August 18, 2009 at 8:47 AM | PERMALINK

You'll support negotiations and diplomacy with certified lunatics like Kim Jong Il and Achmandijad, even if they had a bomb strapped to their chest hugging a small child.

But negotiate with fellow Americans in the Congress? Unthinkiable!

THis is why Obamacare is failing. Because of the tyrannical proclivities of Democrats.

Posted by: DocGonzo on August 18, 2009 at 8:51 AM | PERMALINK

Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise?

What it tells us, is that this process of hammering out a bill can and should get a whole lot faster. No need to bother with republicans, just the bought and paid for DINOs are holding up the show. Serious pressure needs to be screwed down on those Baucus and Nelson folks.

Posted by: about time on August 18, 2009 at 8:51 AM | PERMALINK

The Senate Finance Committee's "gang of six" just announced their compromise:

1) A federal rule that invalidates state insurance regulations.

2) New federal regulations stating that there will be no federal regulations.

3) The tax rate for the top two federal income tax brackets will be cut in half.

4) Ronald Reagan's face will be carved on Mt. Rushmore..

Committee chair Max Baucus (D-AETNA) said that with this bipartisan compromise he expects as many as ten Republicans will vote for the bill.


Posted by: SteveT on August 18, 2009 at 8:52 AM | PERMALINK

My hope is that team Obama already understood this, and this becomes the point where they pivot, say "there is no hope of bipartisanship", and push through a bill with real reform. During the campaign, they were able to perform this way, but I haven't seen it yet out of the Obama White House. So I'm probably a fool to hope.

Posted by: short fuse on August 18, 2009 at 8:54 AM | PERMALINK

It's my sincere hope that this willingness to negotiate with the GOP is a head fake by the Dems, that by showing a reasonableness towards the Republican's and Blue Dogs' objections, and then by highlighting their resistance to what's left even after their objections are considered, the Dems can then announce they acted in good faith, the opposition didn't, and now it's time to get this thing passed through budget reconciliation.

Posted by: episty on August 18, 2009 at 8:56 AM | PERMALINK

Wait for it. Now that the "death panels" meme has done its job, the prospect of insurance "co-ops" will be likened to herding Americans into healthcare concentration camps.

Posted by: dr. bloor on August 18, 2009 at 8:58 AM | PERMALINK

Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise?

It should tell us that, but instead--and I know I'm getting all tin-foil hatty here--it seems like this eventuality was foreordained, that no one really wanted health care reform to begin with. Or rather, no one thought reform could actually happen because everyone realizes that Congress and perhaps the White House as well are completely in thrall of the corporations and oligarchs, and are merely appearing to engage in a reform battle when they had no intention of going through with it.

I'm pretty despondent right now. The fact that many voices have been saying--shouting--all along "don't try to negotiate with these people" and they tried anyway makes me wonder. Makes me wonder if "these people" are actually the lot of them, and while each side sports a "D" or an "R" armband, that label is superfluous as they are all in the same club, and in the tank.

Sigh.

Posted by: terraformer on August 18, 2009 at 8:59 AM | PERMALINK

We're dealing here with career politicians. They are professionals; it's what they do for a living, just like plumbers and lawyers and bureaucrats.

And as such, getting re-elected is Number One on the to-do list- without winning that two or six year ritual, all else pales.

And WHAT you do to get re-elected- lie, cheat, steal, make back room deals with anybody with a buck to contribute- is how you advance your career.

Oh, for the halcyon days of the early Republic, of the Citizen Legislator who did his civic duty in Washington, then went back to his farm. . .

Posted by: DAY on August 18, 2009 at 9:05 AM | PERMALINK

"The death of American political discourse notwithstanding, let's be clear about the larger debate:"

What debate? The right is out to destroy the Obama presidency, it has no compunction to declare so publicly, yet the Democrats, from Obama on down, want to talk.

Oh, and how do you debate with people bringing guns? Cause, believe me, the last two incidences where just the beginning. How many guys with guns can the police or the secret service 'keep an eye on' before that approach becomes inoperable. I suspect we'll find out.

Posted by: SRW1 on August 18, 2009 at 9:09 AM | PERMALINK

adding to my snark from 8:52 --

President Obama called the Senate Finance Committee compromise a "proposal that he could support" and he urged Democrats to not let "perfect become the enemy of the good."

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said the proposed compromise was "a step in the right direction." But he added that "if the President really wanted to be bi-partisan he would advocate for the four faces currently on Mt. Rushmore to be removed to a make room for an appropriate carving of Ronald Reagan."


Posted by: SteveT on August 18, 2009 at 9:14 AM | PERMALINK

The only option is Budget Reconciliation, the way that Medicare was enacted under President Johnson and a Democratic Congress and the method fratboy and the Republicans used to cut taxes for wealthy people.

Posted by: Captain Dan on August 18, 2009 at 9:17 AM | PERMALINK

kabuki theatre in potemkin village...

welcome to washington dc "the nation's capital"

where your life means nothing in the greater good of the corporate world

Posted by: neill on August 18, 2009 at 9:18 AM | PERMALINK

The administration needs to get it through its thick head that the GOP is going to oppose anything and everything they do. And if they quash healthcare, they derail Obama and he'll never get back on the tracks.

I'd like to think that the administration would wake up and finally smell the Folgers, but I'm not holding my breath.

Posted by: Doctor Whom on August 18, 2009 at 9:19 AM | PERMALINK

Charlie Brown. Football. Lucy. Enough said.

THis is why Obamacare is failing. Because of the tyrannical proclivities of Democrats.

Tell it to people who didn't live through 8 years of Bush ramming through most of what he wanted without needing any 60-vote supermajorities (not to mention, making up new, unconstitutional executive powers every week so he could bypass Congress altogether). They're the only ones who won't laugh in your stupid face.

Posted by: Steve LaBonne on August 18, 2009 at 9:21 AM | PERMALINK

Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise? Shouldn't this tell you that the dems suck?

Posted by: Rick on August 18, 2009 at 9:21 AM | PERMALINK

Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise?
------------------------

Sure, it should. Just like the last eight years should have. But if they haven't figured it out by now, I don't have a lot of hope that they'll figure it out this time either.

Posted by: Fleas correct the era on August 18, 2009 at 9:23 AM | PERMALINK

The very people who would benefit by reform are the very ones being manipulated by the robber barons. What can one expect from ignorant, prejudiced, stupid people!

Posted by: capalistpig on August 18, 2009 at 9:26 AM | PERMALINK

Guys and dolls, from my perspective (north of the border), you're fucked as a nation. Let me count the ways:
1) racist knuckle draggers rule the land, are armed to the teeth and can be convinced to act against their best interests (i.e. universal care)
2) demagogues of all kind control those masses with impunity and success (Fox scores big)
3) Obama, on which ALL your dreams (and OURS - Canada was overwelmingly supportive) is ineffective and drops the ball CONSTANTLY.
4) Repugs will be back in power with a vengeance, and probably with a few crazies at the helm. Brace yourselves.

It breaks my heart real bad that Obama didn't live up to its promise. I was REALLY emotionnally invested in his election. But deMint might be right that if the health reform dies, so will Obama's mandate and public support because wimps don't win.

Matt Taibi had a tantalizing observation on trueslant.com:

" I’ll say this for George Bush: you’d never have caught him frantically negotiating against himself to take the meat out of a signature legislative initiative just because his approval ratings had a bad summer. Can you imagine Bush and Karl Rove allowing themselves to be paraded through Washington on a leash by some dimwit Republican Senator of a state with six people in it the way the Obama White House this summer is allowing Max Baucus (favorite son of the mighty state of Montana) to frog-march them to a one-term presidency? "

Posted by: Mario on August 18, 2009 at 9:28 AM | PERMALINK

Seat of the pants presedentin'

NYT:

The White House has indicated that it could accept a nonprofit health care cooperative as an alternative to a new government insurance plan, originally favored by President Obama.

Benen & Klein:

It's going to be tough to rally support for an idea when it's not altogether clear what it is, or how it would work.

Posted by: koreyel on August 18, 2009 at 9:29 AM | PERMALINK

History does repeat itself!

We are witnessing a gun fight over health care reform. The rethugnicans brought corporately provided machine guns and the dumbocraps brought pocket knives.

We will get 'reform' that will again screw over the Amerikan sheeple. But, The Chosen One will get a stale, moldy half loaf and will proclaim that he brought home the bread.

For real change - Feingold/Sanders in 2012!

Posted by: AngryOldVet on August 18, 2009 at 9:34 AM | PERMALINK

Professor Cole is astute on domestic affairs as well as foreign!

Posted by: Captain Dan on August 18, 2009 at 9:36 AM | PERMALINK

Professor Cole is astute on domestic affairs as well as foreign!

John Cole is not the same person as Prof Juan Cole!

Posted by: SRW1 on August 18, 2009 at 9:44 AM | PERMALINK

Oh for God's sake...Obama IS smarter than all of this...did you WATCH the campaign? The 'pubs will whine and snivel about any proposal and THEN when the Dems get it thru with only 51 votes will whine and snivel that Obama 'promised' bipartisianship and didn't DO it...they are aholes. It's true. Look at the comments. Obama isn't WILLING to talk to the Republicans. That's ALL he does but when you are a liar you're a liar and THAT is the new platform of the Republican party.

Posted by: SYSPROG on August 18, 2009 at 9:45 AM | PERMALINK

Obama needs to take control of this country. He needs to demonstrate his LEADERSHIP abilities and stop this run away train of the far right and republicans who are running this country to the ground with chaos and winning. Obama STOP the Republican bedlam.LEAD our country with a back bone from you and the Democrats. Pragmatism has lost you control of the agenda. Stop fishin' and cut bait!

Posted by: mljohnston on August 18, 2009 at 9:47 AM | PERMALINK

Seems that the White House would rather talk anout Republican votes in the Senate which will NEVER appear than DEAL with the REAL PROBLEM in the Senate...
Baucus, Conrad, Lieberman, Nelson

These "DEMS" need to accept a Public Option !

Posted by: ParityFanatic on August 18, 2009 at 9:47 AM | PERMALINK

Check out this actual REALITY of that corporate pig shit called Senator Grassley and the 'co-ops' idea ...

***********************************************

Hopes for co-ops also may be tempered by the experience of Iowa, home to Sen. Chuck Grassley, the senior Republican on the Finance Committee, which is trying to hash out a bipartisan health-care proposal.

In the 1990s, Iowa adopted a law to encourage the development of health-care co-ops. One was created, and it died within two years. Although the law is still on the books, the state does not have a co-op now, said Iowa Insurance Commissioner Susan Voss.

Posted by: stormskies on August 18, 2009 at 9:55 AM | PERMALINK

I'd second SYSPROG sentiments that this cry fest drivel is making me fucking puke. If Republicans can break Obama with a few town-hall hecklers and some gun-toting bandits screaming non-sense about death panels, I'd be surprised. And if they do, those mother fuckers are going to have one hell of a time putting the crazy back in the bottle when they get back in power.

Posted by: wtf on August 18, 2009 at 9:58 AM | PERMALINK

I think they are now against co-ops, in the hope that the Dems will think they better SETTLE for co-ops, and that a universal public option is a bridge too far.

As Mark Thma reports, the private insurance industry's shares have risen with the report of co-ops. Why? Co-ops can be easily beaten because they won't start out with purchasing power. And co-ops introduce their own realm of continual fuss and bother, because their members have to deal with advocacy and voting issues about direction and management. It's a whole new layer of making you waste your time. Make it all very confusing and frustrating and time-consuming, and people will give up on it.

Posted by: Lee A. Arnold on August 18, 2009 at 10:04 AM | PERMALINK

I am indicating to myself that that at this point in time I am open to an alternative to Obama in the White House. It is not just Senators and Representatives who can be primaried. And if a moderate, non-war-mongering repug still exists in that party and can make it through the GOP primary, I think I would be open to that option as well. Why not? I guess it's not just politicians who can put principles and the needs and best interests of their constituents to the side for a small minority.

Posted by: bubba on August 18, 2009 at 10:04 AM | PERMALINK

Normally in a negotiation, the two parties move toward each other. But the GOP isn't moving toward the center, here. In fact, it seems they are gaining speed moving AWAY, toward an even more extreme position. At the rate they're going, pretty soon they'll have gotten to arguing that governmental regulation of insurance companies is oppressive socialism that must be overthrown, and demand that any bill should include provisions invalidating state regulations, and saying that anything less than a 'free market' is some kind of Nazi Communist plot to make Grannie kill her own puppy or something.

It's not just that they won't agree to anything Dems want, it's that very soon they'll be demanding even crazier things.

Posted by: biggerbox on August 18, 2009 at 10:06 AM | PERMALINK

I share other commentors sense of disappointment in Obama and the way healthcare has been handled. I do not think there is some genius move at the bottom of this pathetic pitch and roll. It was never clear to me what Obama wanted with respect to healthcare. When I was asked to call members of congress by Obama's folks, I asked "and tell them what, I support Obama? I don't even know what he wants?" But, honestly, who are we kidding. Corporations own Washington, and Obama can't do anything about that. He was never that good, and while I admire, on some level, his incrementalist approach, I am afraid it is too philosophical to really have any impact on the actual politics of the moment.

Posted by: Scott F. on August 18, 2009 at 10:10 AM | PERMALINK

"As the situation stands, there's no existing model for co-ops to follow and no policy specifics on Conrad's idea, so it's impossible to say whether, or how, they will work.

Actually, there are existing models for co-ops. In the state of Illinois, Government entities (cities, counties, etc.) are allowed to band together and self-fund health care for their employees. School districts can do the same. In fact, one of the largest school co-ops has been around 20+ years and over the last 5 years has averaged only a 3% increase in funding costs year over year.

By the way, any mutual insurance company would be another 'model' for co-ops. A co-op is nothing more than several entities banding together to spread risk and share costs. How Socialist!
Mutual of Omaha should be sent back to Russia!

Posted by: Gridlock on August 18, 2009 at 10:15 AM | PERMALINK

We hear all the talk that the Republican party is irrelevant and lost - a mere white man, southern party. It seems to me that the party that's lost and irrelevant is the "Democrat" party.

Posted by: Adam on August 18, 2009 at 10:19 AM | PERMALINK

I'd second SYSPROG sentiments that this cry fest drivel is making me fucking puke.

You're surprised about this? You weren't around for the FISA-fest I guess.

Same shit, different flies. And precisely why we fail every fucking time.

Posted by: MissMudd on August 18, 2009 at 10:25 AM | PERMALINK

Because I don't want to be seen as an inflexible progressive and the enemy of the good, let's just go ahead and give up co-ops.

Posted by: doubtful on August 18, 2009 at 10:48 AM | PERMALINK

Continuing negotiations with people like grassley in the face of reality probably means that some democrats want reform to fail, too. There's no other explanation for it.

Posted by: CDW on August 18, 2009 at 10:52 AM | PERMALINK

Okay, we all know they won't support co-ops. I wonder how the Republicans would feel about dropping the existing restrictions on selling health insurance across states lines? That would be the same kind of gift to insurance companies that Medicare Plan D was to big pharma. Of course all but the young and healthy would be screwed but when was that ever a concern to a Republican? (Selling insurance across state lines was John McCain's response to Obama's push for health care reform when the two were running in 2008.)

Posted by: 3reddogs on August 18, 2009 at 10:54 AM | PERMALINK

The Senate Finance Committee has until 9/15 to vote on a bill. Obama gave them that deadline last week. Am I the only one that read that last week?? Everyone on both sides really ought to wait until then to duke it out. The press is as bad as the people who ABSOLUTELY have to have the public option. They constantly parse what and how the Admin. explains the general outline of a plan. This is about the 5th time that Huff Post went with the blaring red headline "No Public Option" because someone in Admin didn't say "public option" when they talked about health care in the last month. I'm not taking sides until something comes out of the Finance Comm. Nothing is moving until then. It doesn't matter what kind of fits are thrown.

Posted by: crw on August 18, 2009 at 11:10 AM | PERMALINK

I support the kind of health care reforms that John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods, wrote about recently in the Wall Street Journal. Those kind of reforms make sense.

None of the "reforms" in the currently moving legislation make sense. The government has not done so well in veteran's health care, or in Medicare. Why would anyone think the current legislation would be beneficial?

It makes me think of a teenager who says, "Dad, I wrecked the Malibu you gave me, and then I wrecked the Crown Vic you loaned me, but if you'll just give me money for a Rolls-Royce, I'll do just fine!"

Posted by: MKS on August 18, 2009 at 11:10 AM | PERMALINK

And if a moderate, non-war-mongering repug still exists in that party and can make it through the GOP primary, I think I would be open to that option as well.

My cat has a better chance of winning the lottery. Republican primaries are dominated by the extremists, McCain is about as centrist as you can ever expect to get from a Republican candidate in this environment.

Posted by: Shalimar on August 18, 2009 at 11:24 AM | PERMALINK
terraformer@8:59: I'm pretty despondent right now. The fact that many voices have been saying--shouting--all along "don't try to negotiate with these people" and they tried anyway makes me wonder. Makes me wonder if "these people" are actually the lot of them, and while each side sports a "D" or an "R" armband, that label is superfluous as they are all in the same club, and in the tank.

That's the thing about the corporitization of American politics: wise investors diversify and are indifferent to ideals, belief or ethics. 'Never put your eggs in one basket' means investing in the Republican Party but hedging your bets with the opposition too.

It's 'good cop/bad cop'. Our side plays the "good cop" but both ultimately work for the same corporate interests.

Posted by: JTK on August 18, 2009 at 11:44 AM | PERMALINK

Just give the fucking in. Move out of the country and start funding revolutionaries. This country, as it currently stands, doesn't deserve continued existence. Jefferson's revolution is long overdue.

Posted by: ... on August 18, 2009 at 12:05 PM | PERMALINK

Thank god I've got my own brain and don't need to rely on the naysayers on this messageboard to know what's going on. You'd think from reading this crap that we already lost and healthcare reform was scuttled. Wah wah, Republicans won't give in! Democrats aren't following my orders! And all i can do about it is bitch! Wah!

This is politics, guys. This is how it works. You don't always get what you want. And if all you do is complain about how tough everything is, you don't get anything you want. You've got two choices: Either go out there and try to convince people who can still be convinced, or write comments at liberal blogs about how hopeless it all is. Only one of these options does any good, while the other just makes things worse.

Seriously, I have no earthly idea why you guys are spending all your time telling other liberals about how futile it all is. The fight is still in full swing, yet you guys are already licking your wounds and calling it quits. This isn't how you win battles.

Posted by: Doctor Biobrain on August 18, 2009 at 12:22 PM | PERMALINK

The fight is in full swing, but the way this is going to play out is this (IMO): the Republicans really don't want health care reform,i.e it's not just the public option they are agains, they want no change. If they thought healthcare reform was a priority they would have done something about it during the 6 years from 2001-2006 that they controlled congress and the exec branch. Obama can't convince blue dogs that public option is a must now, but once blue dogs see that Republicans aren't going to cooperate on any health reform, Obama will just push it though Senate without bipartisan sponsorship.

Posted by: Bruce on August 18, 2009 at 12:51 PM | PERMALINK

"Shouldn't this tell Democrats something about the utility of negotiations, and the futility of finding a bipartisan compromise?"

Now if they'd only apply that logic about the futility of negotiations to dealings with North Korea and Iran...

Posted by: John Thacker on August 18, 2009 at 12:57 PM | PERMALINK

They will fix the bill if they can just get it out of that stupid fucking committee. "Sure, what ever you say Conrad, Baucus, I agree, whatever, now can we just have the bill please. Come on, no more delays, even if it's only one page, just give us a fucking bill."

Can't fix it if they won't give it to ya'. "That's not what your wife said" Grassley will stall it no matter what it says. Push him down some steps or something but bypass this a-hole and give us a bill.

Posted by: bjobotts on August 18, 2009 at 1:00 PM | PERMALINK

"If they thought healthcare reform was a priority they would have done something about it during the 6 years from 2001-2006 that they controlled congress and the exec branch."

Actually, bills were passed by the House several times to extend the tax deduction that corporations get for providing health benefits to individuals purchasing insurance. But the bills were filibustered in the Senate every time.

Too bad, really, because I believe that individuals deserve the same privileges as corporations there.

Posted by: John Thacker on August 18, 2009 at 1:02 PM | PERMALINK

The people do not elect members of the Money Party, but members of both parties join and answer to no one else. Bribery is legal in America's legislature so the Money Party grows without consequence.

Posted by: bjobotts on August 18, 2009 at 1:07 PM | PERMALINK

Cheerleaders don't understand that blog commenting and activism are not mutually exclusive? Color me shocked.

Posted by: doubtful on August 18, 2009 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

Sorry, haven't read the comments, but I like something Sen. Chuck Shumer said. (I paraphrase for some failed attempt at anonymity.):

Call the public option a co-op and pass it.

Make Fox and their synchophants (a.k.a. Republicans) try to explain the difference and come up with a competing phrase.

Posted by: Bob Johnson on August 18, 2009 at 1:55 PM | PERMALINK

You'll support negotiations and diplomacy with certified lunatics like Kim Jong Il and Achmandijad, even if they had a bomb strapped to their chest hugging a small child.

But negotiate with fellow Americans in the Congress? Unthinkiable!

Because unlike negotiating with the Republicans, there's something to be gained by negotiating with North Korea and Iran.

Jackass.

It's a helluva note when the Republicans are less likely to negotiate in good faith than Iran and North Korea. Nice.

Posted by: Gregory on August 18, 2009 at 2:52 PM | PERMALINK

Public Health Care could pay a big part of the costs,private Mutual Organizations could
pay the difference.

Posted by: Avisse on August 18, 2009 at 3:16 PM | PERMALINK

Obama has reached out to conservaitives numerous times only to have his hand bitten and then blamed in a typical republican media blitz-bait and switch ploy.
Moving the goal posts is a favorite, time honored tradition for republicans. Devoid of any genuine ideas, they look to their past for their future only to find tired old, outdated slogans and their favorite and well worn Atwater/Rovian divide and conquer tactics are no longer working on over 70% of the American populace.

All Obama has to do now that the populace has risen up FOR a public option is give these guys enough rope, their racism and fear will do the rest.

Posted by: Michael on August 18, 2009 at 5:37 PM | PERMALINK

"...4) Repugs will be back in power with a vengeance, and probably with a few crazies at the helm. Brace yourselves..."-Mario

Where does anyone get the idea that the nation will scream "Bush...bring back the Bush administration...we want Bush back", if Obama fails to get HC reform through??

Republicans brought us this disaster and they have no new plans or policies so why think the citizens would want these deceitful, lying, protectors of the wealthy. Hell no, we're not "Mad as hell and want more tax cuts on the wealthy". We'll just get rid of those conservadems and get better dems in office...not the party of insanity and lunatics.

We also will support and pressure Obama to get what we want accomplished in spite of our right wing media screaming defeat and failure. The desperate right wing knuckle draggers have buried themselves in mud. The majority is for reform.

Posted by: bjobotts on August 18, 2009 at 7:35 PM | PERMALINK

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Posted by: UK Birding on January 14, 2011 at 8:31 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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