Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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September 24, 2009

THURSDAY'S MINI-REPORT.... Today's edition of quick hits:

* Good start: "President Obama presided over the United Nations Security Council on Thursday as it unanimously passed a resolution aimed at shoring up the international commitment to limiting the spread of nuclear weapons, in particular halting the diversion of nuclear material for bomb development."

* I don't imagine this'll be the last word on the subject: "The Senate Finance Committee rejected a Democratic amendment to its healthcare bill that would have expanded prescription-drug coverage to people on Medicare."

* Najibullah Zazi gets indicted: "The Justice Department announced Thursday that a 24-year-old immigrant from Afghanistan has been indicted on a charge of conspiring to use "weapons of mass destruction" against targets in the United States, and federal prosecutors sought his indefinite detention without bail."

* What's the latest on the census worker found dead in Kentucky? Zachary Roth summarizes the latest.

* Predictable: "The Massachusetts Republican Party has gone to court in an attempt to stop the appointment of Paul Kirk to the late Ted Kennedy's Senate seat."

* Let's put Speaker Pelosi down as a "no" on a public-option "trigger."

* HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebilius makes clear that flu vaccines will be voluntary. Don't believe anyone who says otherwise.

* Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) notices that some of his GOP colleagues are pawns of the health insurance industry.

* Gen. Stanley McChrystal says "there's no rift" with the White House and he isn't resigning.

* Better than it sounds: "The Obama administration has decided not to seek new legislation from Congress authorizing the indefinite detention of about 50 terrorism suspects being held without charges at at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, officials said Wednesday." Glenn Greenwald explains why this is good news.

* New optimism on an AIDS vaccine?

* Consequences of the missile-defense shift: "Hmm, Russian president Medvedev certainly sounds more open to sanctions against Iran than his foreign minister did a couple of weeks ago. I wonder what might explain that."

* ACORN heads to court.

* On a related note: "The community organizing group ACORN is under review by a Treasury Department inspector general as part of an investigation into the Internal Revenue Service's oversight of non-profit organizations."

* Journalism school enrollment is soaring even as the industry is tanking.

* Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) heads home from the hospital.

* Media Matters highlights RedState.org's "deep, shadowy connections with ACORN."

* Water on the moon. Cool.

* I'd encourage the White House to put Vice President Biden in front of more seniors, more often.

* Quote of the Day, from Matt Yglesias: "I was out on the Hamburg cocktail party circuit last night and mentioned to a German woman that an American Senator had been mentioning Germany as an example of a country where government doesn't run the health care system. Well, she laughed pretty hard at that idea. I tried to explain to her that he's a really important Senator, known for being sharper than some of his colleagues on the Finance Committee and then it turned into more one of those rueful laughs."

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

Steve Benen 5:30 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (18)

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"The Senate Finance Committee rejected a Democratic amendment to its healthcare bill that would have expanded prescription-drug coverage to people on Medicare."

It's important to note that this healthcare bill is already expanding prescription-drug coverage to Medicare recipients. Nelson's amendment would have increased that expansion.

Posted by: converse on September 24, 2009 at 5:35 PM | PERMALINK

Our Al has outdone himself in the comments on the Byrd release:
Your right you do have all the uninformed/uneducated people behind you. But us Republicans we achually pefer to know what were voting for. We don’t just vote for someone becuase their black or becuse they want to “change america” (into the united scocalist states of america)
— Al

Lemon tea straight onto the keyboard (thank goodness for the keyboard "condom") :) Good job, Al!

Posted by: exlibra on September 24, 2009 at 6:29 PM | PERMALINK
Matt Yglesias: ""I was out on the Hamburg cocktail party circuit last night and mentioned to a German woman that an American Senator had been mentioning Germany as an example of a country where government doesn't run the health care system. Well, she laughed pretty hard at that idea."

What Really Happened: "So there I was, trying to pick up this totally hot German babe, because I hadn't been laid in weeks if not months, and when I asked her if she wanted to share a wienerschnitzel - cocking my eyebrow suggestively - she just laughed, called me pathetic, and then threw her beer in my face."

Posted by: Out & About in the Castro on September 24, 2009 at 6:35 PM | PERMALINK

Nothing about the cops beating the shit out of G20 protesters?

Guess cop violence in "protection" of a Dem Pres just ain't news on this blog....

Posted by: Disputo on September 24, 2009 at 6:41 PM | PERMALINK

Speaking of keyboard condoms...

Krugman's 90-minute warning

Posted by: koreyel on September 24, 2009 at 6:56 PM | PERMALINK

"The Senate Finance Committee rejected a Democratic amendment to its healthcare bill that would have expanded prescription-drug coverage to people on Medicare."

No surprise, considering the venue.

Let's just get this baby into conference, where the House side can make sure there is a Public Option, better subsidies, and more prescription drug coverage for Medicare. Then when it comes out of conference we get to see which Senate Democrats are willing to allow the entire healthcare reform legislation to go down in flames just because it has a Public Option.

Oh, and in the mean time, can we get somebody to watch Senator Byrd and make sure he doesn't fall down any stairs ?

Posted by: Joe Friday on September 24, 2009 at 7:00 PM | PERMALINK

We can find water on the moon but scabble over providing basic healthcare to all of our citizens.

We can argue til the cows come home about how many boots to have on the ground in a country that doesn't have much more water than the moon, but we can't provide basic healthcare to our electorate, here, in this country, on this planet.

We can spend 100s of billions bailing out gambling finacial institutions but we balk at basic healthcare for ourselves.

I don't claim to have a handle on the numbers, but I'm sure that basic healthcare for us all would be a wonderfully positive thing! So what if the government gets involved? Who runs the military? Who built our Interstates? Who bailed out Wall Street? Who pays for our elected officials healthcare? Who runs our schools? Who sent men to the moon? Who subsidized satellite launches so that you and I can use all manner of modern electronic devices? Yes... the god awful govment which so many punkin heads think has NO business managing basic healthcare!

To everyone (in DC)..... stop the bullshit, we need help with the spiraling costs of healthcare in this country. It ain't about socialism, it's about plain, simple human decency. Get 'er dun.

Posted by: Tom Nicholson on September 24, 2009 at 7:02 PM | PERMALINK

CNN's current Breaking News headline:

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was hospitalized after falling ill, a court spokeswoman said.

No details yet.

Posted by: Michael W on September 24, 2009 at 8:07 PM | PERMALINK

EVERYTHING Tom Nicholson said at 7:02

Posted by: Kevin on September 24, 2009 at 8:31 PM | PERMALINK

Everything Tom Nicholson said.

Maybe the Money Party wants Ruth Bader Ginsberg out of action after what she said during opening arguments last week. Please be careful Judge Ginsberg. Avoid right wing health care professionals and restaurants where they might work. Isn't it awful that I have to suggest this?

Many rocks contain H2O in molecular form that is released by heating and reabsorbed when cooled. Maybe that's the water they've found on the moon in such thin layers. (2 or 3 molecules thick) Solar heating while the sun is shining and really cold shadows at other times.

Posted by: anonymous on September 24, 2009 at 9:02 PM | PERMALINK

You can say that again...

* I'd encourage the White House to put Vice President Biden in front of more seniors, more often.

Posted by: koreyel on September 24, 2009 at 9:51 PM | PERMALINK

Deep question

The foreigner Rupert Murdoch pays Glen Beck, his domestic mouthpiece, millions of dollars to say things like this:

This president, I think, has exposed himself as a guy, over and over and over again, who has a deep-seated hatred for white people or the white culture.

Has there ever, in the history of the USA, been a foreigner who has used the country's own infrastructure to foment such rage and hate at a sitting president?

Posted by: koreyel on September 24, 2009 at 10:01 PM | PERMALINK

Update on Justice Ginsburg

Ginsburg, 76, felt faint, light-headed and fatigued about 4:50 p.m., around an hour after receiving a treatment for iron deficiency, the court said in a statement.

She was monitored by an in-house physician, who performed blood tests and found her to be in stable health.

Her symptoms improved, though she was taken to the Washington Hospital Center as a precaution at about 7:45 p.m., according to the court statement.

Sounds like she's going to be okay. Good to hear.

Posted by: Michael W on September 25, 2009 at 12:12 AM | PERMALINK

"HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebilius makes clear that flu vaccines will be voluntary. "

Well, of course. We are short of vaccine anyway. Why waste it on someone who doesn't want it?

Actually this isn't such a good idea in all cases because vaccination of most people provides herd immunity to protect the few who either don't get vaccinated or didn't develop immunity. Some examples of where vaccination should be required is workers at nursing homes since the aged don't have the strongest immune systems in the world and vaccination of the elderly won't protect them if they are heavily exposed. Another example would be people who are in close contact with lots of other people like the security checkers at airports or food servers just about anywhere.

Posted by: Texas Aggie on September 25, 2009 at 12:25 AM | PERMALINK

***Matt Yglesias: ""I was out on the Hamburg cocktail party circuit last night and mentioned to a German woman that an American Senator had been mentioning Germany as an example of a country where government doesn't run the health care system. Well, she laughed pretty hard at that idea."
What Really Happened: "So there I was, trying to pick up this totally hot German babe, because I hadn't been laid in weeks if not months, and when I asked her if she wanted to share a wienerschnitzel - cocking my eyebrow suggestively - she just laughed, called me pathetic, and then threw her beer in my face."***

What he forgot was "then I massaged the German Chancellor's shoulders... grabbed a fresh bottle and headed back to Crawford"

If you want fantasy MORAN (yeah I know, but they won't get it), try a little plausible BS

Posted by: JHT on September 25, 2009 at 1:19 AM | PERMALINK

Looks like Iran got caught red-handed with a secret nuclear weapons facility. Oops. Makes all that nuclear disarmament talk yesterday at the UN looks like just that - talk.

It also puts a fresh spin on why Russia will agree to sanction Iran: not because of Obama withdrawing its missile shield from Poland, but because the US told Russia of Iran's secret facility.

It also gives the Israelis more credit. They have been warning for months if not years about an aggressive Iranian program.

Question is: what will Obama do? What can he do, at this point?

Posted by: Pully Bullpit on September 25, 2009 at 7:53 AM | PERMALINK

So Rick Cantor thinks a woman with stomach tumors who was kicked off her health insurance plan by her insurer should have options? Just what options does he think she should have?

Lets see if we can identify them:

Option 1: Her insurer has a change of heart and puts her back on her old plan, treats the tumors and the woman lives. Odds of this happening: 0

Option 2: Rep. Cantor contacts the woman's family directly and helps them identify a government grant program for cancer-stricken mothers that will help them pay for treatment. Odds of this happening: 0

Option 3: A rich member of the stricken woman's church ponies up $500,000 for chemotherapy at commercial list prices. Odds of this happening: 1%

Option 4: People in the woman's home town band together and holds bake sales, 5K runs, 10K walks, door-to-door candy sales, gift wrap sales, direct fund appeals at the local grocery store and they raise $25,000 for one month of treatment and hospitalization. Odds of this happening: 15%.

Option 5: Congress passes a public option and the woman gets the treatment she needs and recovers. Odds of this happening: 50%

Option 6: The woman's cancer goes untreated, she lives another two months and dies. Odds of this happening: 95%

Let's see how Rep. Cantor plays this out. Does he come through or just pass the buck because he was just dealing with the immediacy of the situation?

Posted by: pj in jesusland on September 25, 2009 at 9:13 AM | PERMALINK

Here is my theory about the death of the census-taker in Kentucky: the man was an attention seeker. He wrote FED on his own body, tied himself up, then waited to be found by someone so he could give his story to the media. Unfortunately, the rope looped around his neck was tighter than he had planned. He passed out, his body sagged and he died from accidental strangulation.

Posted by: nate on September 25, 2009 at 9:54 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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