Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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February 11, 2010

MICROCHIPS AND ANTICHRISTS.... Virginia's House of Delegates spent some time this week debating a bill to prevent employers or insurance companies from implanting microchips in Virginians' bodies against their will. There's no effort underway to actually impose involuntary chips on anyone, but lawmakers just want to be sure.

Part of the concern is based on privacy rights, and part of this is motivated by a desire to "save humanity from the antichrist." Seriously.

Del. Mark L. Cole (R-Fredericksburg), the bill's sponsor, said that privacy issues are the chief concern behind his attempt to criminalize the involuntary implantation of microchips. But he also said he shared concerns that the devices could someday be used as the "mark of the beast" described in the Book of Revelation.

"My understanding -- I'm not a theologian -- but there's a prophecy in the Bible that says you'll have to receive a mark, or you can neither buy nor sell things in end times," Cole said. "Some people think these computer chips might be that mark." [...]

[T]he growing use of microchips has collided with the Book of Revelation.... David Neff, editor of the magazine Christianity Today, said that some fundamentalist Christians believe that bar codes and implanted microchips could be used by a totalitarian government to control commerce -- a sign of the coming end of the world.

The legislation passed yesterday.

Some state lawmakers found all of this hard to believe. "We've got a $4 billion hole, and we're spending time on microchips," said Del. Albert C. Pollard Jr. (D). "At least when Nero fiddled, they got good music."

Virginia isn't the only state where this is come up -- Georgia's state Senate is apparently supposed to take up the issue next week.

Steve Benen 12:35 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (58)

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We are talking about the bible belt; where the Southern Baptists dominate. It is said to say normal for this area.

Posted by: verberne on February 11, 2010 at 12:43 PM | PERMALINK

I'm okay with this. Mostly because I don't want a situation where you MUST be implanted under the skin to even be eligible for work, or so you can be tracked the entire time.

I could understand if it was a wrist band or pin or something. I could also understand if we are talking about a job in say the military. But if you're a corporate researcher or something, the company should not be able to force it on you.

Also I went to an evangelical school k-8 and while the teachers were pretty neutral, I heard stuff like this coming from the students a lot. So I guess I am just more sympathetic to their concerns. Basically it's a minor law that is probably a good thing to have passed that someone people passed for different reasons that are somewhat questionable.

Posted by: MNPundt on February 11, 2010 at 12:45 PM | PERMALINK

These people never cease to amaze. Are they really this stupid, or are they just pols being a bit more cynical than usual? Has pat robertson weighed in on the issue yet?

Posted by: CDW on February 11, 2010 at 12:46 PM | PERMALINK

The GOP is trying to keep us safe from the Borg. Isn't that nice.

Posted by: Jamie on February 11, 2010 at 12:47 PM | PERMALINK

The Rethugs get confused about reality now and then. I have a feeling that they heard about the SPCA using the microchips to help people recover lost animals and they took it to the next "logical" step. There has to be a conspiracy behind every bush for these people.

Posted by: candideinnc on February 11, 2010 at 12:48 PM | PERMALINK

Holy Fucking Shit!
"I'm not a theologian No shit, Sherlock...

These kids need a good Sunday school teacher...and civics, and economics...morans, indeed...

Posted by: neill on February 11, 2010 at 12:51 PM | PERMALINK

I don't get it---it's in Revelations, so that means it's going to happen. It's sacrilegious to pass bills that interfere with prophecy. Isn't it?

Posted by: Daryl McCullough on February 11, 2010 at 12:51 PM | PERMALINK

Um, wouldn't even just the existence of these chips be enough to make the existence of the antichrist present? Just wondering - since I assume not everyone will have the mark of the beast. But then I'm not crazy. and then if this really is the mark of the beast that requires you to buy and sell things - the unmarked are just going to barter? I'm no theologian, but...

Posted by: Julene on February 11, 2010 at 12:51 PM | PERMALINK

Actually, I am in favor of the ban on privacy grounds, but I don't think the "anti-christ" would follow this law if he actually existed and gained power in Virginia.

The idea of an "anti-christ" being deterred by the Virginia legislature is pretty comical. Think about it. The most evil force in the world brought up short by a bill passed by the Virginia legislature. That is funny. The sketch writes itself.

Well, passing the bill keeps the legislators out of other mischief.

Posted by: Ron Byers on February 11, 2010 at 12:52 PM | PERMALINK

When the anti-christ comes, he'll have the votes to overturn the law. I never saw a portion of Revelations where democracy trumps the antichrist...

Posted by: Mudge on February 11, 2010 at 12:52 PM | PERMALINK

MNpundt -- who the f*** would consider working for a company that would implant these chips to begin with? Get friggen real. And have you had a company ask you to do this?

I can't believe who we're electing these days to government. It's scary.

Posted by: bill on February 11, 2010 at 12:52 PM | PERMALINK

Dick Cheney is moving to Virginia?

Posted by: ComradeAnon on February 11, 2010 at 12:53 PM | PERMALINK

This particular bit of paranoia has been around for a long time, as MNPundt's post indicates. Timothy McVeigh, as you may recall, was convinced that he'd already been implanted with a microchip. The technology exists, but as far as I know it's only been used for house pets. I'd like to know where people like MNPundt get the notion that implantation in humans is being seriously considered, let alone that it might become a requirement for employment. Is anyone talking about doing so -- aside, that is, from the fear mongers who want to convince you that some evil big-brother type government is secretly watching you at every moment? And why are southern conservatives frightened of this far-fetchd sci-fi scenario when they idolized George Bush -- even thought in absolute seriousness that he had been chosen by God to lead -- and justified his administration's very real abuses of privacy?

Posted by: T-Rex on February 11, 2010 at 12:55 PM | PERMALINK

The Rethugs get confused about reality now and then.

From the same Washington Post article: "Del. David Englin (D-Alexandria) also spoke in support of the bill, saying that as a Jew he knew Orthodox believers who decline to pierce their ears on religious grounds."

Democrats supported this too. Nice try though.

Posted by: axx on February 11, 2010 at 12:56 PM | PERMALINK

A new acronym for the internet -- IANAT. As in:
"IANAT, but I think Katrina was a judgement on homos." Or, "IANAT, but our Constitution was clearly divinely inspired." Or, "IANAT, but damn!"

Posted by: hells littlest angel on February 11, 2010 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

Several years ago, some group of kooks, maybe it was the Lyndon Larouche guys or maybe some other group, was all worried about cannibalism. They tried to get city councils to pass laws against cannibalism.

I see the threat of microchips against our will and cannibalism as about equal. But I guess the GOP figures you can't be too careful.

Posted by: Emily on February 11, 2010 at 12:58 PM | PERMALINK

So when the Anti-christ comes, he'll say "yeah I was thinking about implanting microchips into all Americans, but I've been foiled by the Virginia legislature!" Because if that's the case, this approach could end up being pretty useful.

Posted by: Christopher on February 11, 2010 at 1:00 PM | PERMALINK

said that some fundamentalist Christians believe that bar codes and implanted microchips could be used by a totalitarian government to control commerce -- a sign of the coming end of the world.

I remember a time when people who thought like this were put where they belong: in an asylum. Do they think the Borg are based on an actual race of beings, I wonder?

Posted by: electrolite on February 11, 2010 at 1:00 PM | PERMALINK

T-Rex. There has never been a technology that somebody hasn't tried to exploit to it's logical conclusion. I can imagine some company dominated by command and control freaks insisting on tracking implants as a condition of employment. The data developed would be used to make sure every employee is where he is supposed to be every minute. If you can't you must not know anybody who went to an Ivy League business school.

Posted by: Ron Byers on February 11, 2010 at 1:02 PM | PERMALINK

The most interesting comment from Del. Cole (R-Fredericksburg) was this one:

Cole said that the growing use of microchips could allow employers, insurers or the government to track people against their will and that implanting a foreign object into a human being could also have adverse health effects.

"I just think you should have the right to control your own body," Cole said.

Of course, it all depends the meanings of the words "you," "right," "control" and "body."

For example, if you're a woman who might want to terminate a pregnancy, your "right to control your own body" only kicks in after you ask a doctor for permission.

HB 2301 Abortion; informed consent thereto shall include determination by physician. Mark L. Cole

Informed consent to an abortion. Provides that informed consent to an abortion shall include a determination by a physician, who shall neither perform the abortion nor gain financially by the performance of the abortion, of the viability of the pregnancy as indicated by the presence of a fetal sac within the uterus and of fetal cardiac activity.

Maybe he didn't think it all the way through before he went on the record standing up for the people of Virginia to control their own bodies.

Or, maybe he's just a narrow-minded hypocrite.

Posted by: UncommonSense on February 11, 2010 at 1:02 PM | PERMALINK

No, no, no! The Mark of the Beast is your Social Security Number. Everyone knows *that*, don't they?

Posted by: Jim Strain on February 11, 2010 at 1:03 PM | PERMALINK

If you think this is bad, you should check out what the Utah legislature ("reddest of the red!") is doing. Force women to watch ultrasounds before abortions, making miscarriages illegal, saying that gunz made in Utah aren't subject to federal laws, passing resolutions that say global warming is a conspiracy to limit population, resolving to kill any wolves that stray into Utah, threatening to use emminent domain to take federal lands, and on and on.

Posted by: rdale on February 11, 2010 at 1:05 PM | PERMALINK

I take it the current resurgence of this particular paranoia is about the president being black?

Posted by: Allen on February 11, 2010 at 1:07 PM | PERMALINK

Of course the Repulicans are proposing these kooky bills just to detract attention from the national debates on health care, the strategic lies that the Republicans are telling, and improving economy. BUT its too delicious story not to make a comment

Scene: a convenience store in Virginia

Man brings in another man who wears a suit.

Storekeeper: What have we here?

Man: I'd like to return this state legislator please. He's not right in the head.

Storekeeper: He seems all right to me. What's the problem?

Man:He wants to pass laws preventing the involuntary implanting of microchips into people. The problem is, nobody has ever proposed this. He's looney. He thinks that the computer chip is the tattoo 666 in the book of Revelations.

Store keeper: you mean he's--

Man: Yes! Bonkers, nuts, fruitcakes, over the hill, mad, strange, deranged, kooky, odd, weird, wacked, bats, psycho, overly eccentric, needing psychological help. He is an insane person.

Store keeper: I see your point. I'll give you a complete refund.

Posted by: Kurt on February 11, 2010 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

Why is he worried? As a committed Christian he'll be taken up in the Rapture before the tribulation begins along with all the other committed Christians. Only the unbelievers will be left behind to suffer under the Antichrist.

Unless he's one of those post-tribulation Rapture guys.

Posted by: thorin-1 on February 11, 2010 at 1:10 PM | PERMALINK

If we're going to base public policy on fairy tales, can we at least base it on more entertaining fairy tales?

Posted by: Roddy McCorley on February 11, 2010 at 1:15 PM | PERMALINK

Why stop at employers and insurers? I don't partularly want my cable company, ticketmaster, Microsoft or Acorn involuntarily implanting microchips in me either. But, since none of those organizations employ me, Del. Mark Cole seems to think that would be okay.

Posted by: chuck on February 11, 2010 at 1:17 PM | PERMALINK

Ok, considering what these christians are like, do you really think the antichrist would be that bad?

Posted by: SaintZak on February 11, 2010 at 1:18 PM | PERMALINK

T-Rex makes mention of it, but it probably never dawned on the good leaders of the Virginia legislature that their proposed law is in the same paranoia league as the dude who blew up the federal building in Oklahoma.

Before the McVeigh delusion, remember the international bar code that was supposed to be the mark of the beast? How's that going Evangelical shoppers? -Kevo

Posted by: kevo on February 11, 2010 at 1:20 PM | PERMALINK

We can make fun of the mark of the beast stuff, but I do not think the privacy issue is paranoia. Many employers have GPS units in cars to track their employees work habits. Car rental companies do the same thing. Whenever you use a credit card, it goes in "your permanent record". Somebody is tracking this posting as well as the other websites I visit and the grocery store gets a record of what I purchase when I scan my discount card. I can not get health insurance without opening my entire medical history to the insurance company who will keep it up to date if I want it to pay for any medical treatment I recieve. If I spend anytime in the more populated part of any city in the country the odds are that I will be a tv star and if anybody wants to find me all they have to do is contact my cell phone company.

Posted by: Terry on February 11, 2010 at 1:21 PM | PERMALINK

I have no idea if it's considered now. But think, there's already always tracking devices on the phones that indicate our location, even if we don't want them. We can't even turn them off unless we pull out the battery. They justify them as locators for safety but remember the stir over them a while back because of secrecy and lack of consumer opt out?

Look, I'm not saying companies are doing this now but if all or most companies decide to make it a requirement well.... people are out of luck. The last year has seen just how powerful corporations are in this country. Corporations are basically enemies of the people. You've seen it time and again and each day they get more audacious than the last. They're now openly boasting about their influence in Congress.

Posted by: MNPundit on February 11, 2010 at 1:24 PM | PERMALINK

Doesn't anyone remember this story being on Ron Paul's website back in August?
http://www.dailypaul.com/node/105079

Posted by: david pavlak on February 11, 2010 at 1:26 PM | PERMALINK

but emily, if we have to turn to cannibalism won't the microchips get stuck in our teeth?

Posted by: mellowjohn on February 11, 2010 at 1:30 PM | PERMALINK

"I do not think the privacy issue is paranoia. Many employers have GPS units in cars to track their employees work habits. Car rental companies do the same thing. Whenever you use a credit card, it goes in "your permanent record". Somebody is tracking this posting as well as the other websites I visit and the grocery store gets a record of what I purchase when I scan my discount card. I can not get health insurance without opening my entire medical history to the insurance company who will keep it up to date if I want it to pay for any medical treatment I recieve. If I spend anytime in the more populated part of any city in the country the odds are that I will be a tv star and if anybody wants to find me all they have to do is contact my cell phone company."

... and for some strange reason Virginia's House of Delegates is ignoring all of these so that they can pass laws against their fantasies instead.

Maybe they finally found the one privacy concern they're interested in. Or maybe this is a flucht nach vorn, a baby step toward escaping from their paranoid hallucinations and dealing with privacy concerns in reality too, someday.

Or maybe the inmates really are running the asylum, in Virginia. Which seems more likely to you?

Posted by: Fleas correct the era on February 11, 2010 at 1:37 PM | PERMALINK

I don't care about no stinkin' legislation. I'm getting a collander and some tin foil to wear just in case.

And what about all those invisible radio waves sneaking into my house 24 hours a day without my say so? I'm putting foil over all the electric lights just to be safe. You never know.

Posted by: pj in jesusland on February 11, 2010 at 1:39 PM | PERMALINK

I, for one, welcome our microchip-implanting overlords, especially this keeps me from losing my car keys.

Posted by: Ranger Jay on February 11, 2010 at 1:42 PM | PERMALINK

MNpundt -- who the f*** would consider working for a company that would implant these chips to begin with?

Who would do it? Someone who's been out of work for over a year, someone who's about to lose their house to foreclosure, someone who needs health insurance, someone who wants to feed their kids -- let's not pretend that there aren't a lot of desperate powerless people out there. If it's "chip or your house", "chip or your children's education", "chip or your $100K plus of medical bills" then a lot of people would choose chip.

Posted by: Stefan on February 11, 2010 at 1:50 PM | PERMALINK

Son of a...foiled yet again by the Virginian legislature. Time for plan B.

Menacing laugh.

Posted by: N.T. Christ on February 11, 2010 at 1:52 PM | PERMALINK

Given the usual Republican care and skill in drafting legislation, this bill will probably turn out to ban pacemakers

Posted by: rea on February 11, 2010 at 1:53 PM | PERMALINK

But think, there's already always tracking devices on the phones that indicate our location, even if we don't want them. We can't even turn them off unless we pull out the battery. They justify them as locators for safety - MNPundit

Not exactly. Since the first commercial cell phone networks, users have always been locatable within a fairly small range due to triangulation from the nearest two antenna, even if the phone is "off." This is not for safety or anything more nefarious; this is for proper network operations to meet customer expectations. Because the phone is mobile, the network has to have some way for you to prompty acquire signal if you want to make a call, or for the network to find you if a call is dialled to your phone. As a result, it constantly transmits its EIN (electronic ID number) so that the network can do what it does with a landline phone: determine the proper routing steps of trunks and switches (and towers in the case of a mobile phone) between you and the other end of the call as quickly and seamlessly as possible. Once the call is underway, the constant EIN transmission also allows the network to estimate the next tower you will be carried on and allow the current tower you are on and that next one to coordinate a hand-off without dropping your call. Without the "background" stuff that constant ID transmission allows, customers would never put up with mobile wireless service -- the experience would be too frustrating and too far removed from what we've gotten used to from landline service.

Posted by: zeitgeist on February 11, 2010 at 1:53 PM | PERMALINK

As a former Virginia resident, I suggest that two words explain why this is a priority of the legislature. Those words are "Pat" and "Robertson". You know, that TV evangelist from Virginia Beach that acts as the GOP's kingmaker in the commonwealth, and pulls the strings on its priorities.

Posted by: Bokonon on February 11, 2010 at 2:07 PM | PERMALINK

It's things like this that make me wish Lincoln had just let the south secede. The idiocy that comes out of that region is astonishing.

Posted by: Mikey on February 11, 2010 at 2:19 PM | PERMALINK

yes, Stefan, and these same people who voted for this legislation approved of the actual ways in which our freedom has been infringed upon in this country.

What's scary about this legislation is that it quotes from Revelations for its rationale.

And it ignores real existing infringements upon our freedom and instead legislates against an imaginary one prompted by fundamentalist christian end days conspiracy theorists.

Posted by: bill on February 11, 2010 at 2:19 PM | PERMALINK

Please set me straight; the Beast of Revelation is a man. (singular) The antichrist is plural/singular representing the zeitgeist of the times described by John the revelator. It is a minor yet persistent irritation to hear folks label some politician they hate as "the Antichrist" instead of the "Beast" though maybe I've got it wrong. Isn't there a serious head wound that the Beast miraculously recovers from before he works his agenda? Come Bible scholars, and clarify this please.

Posted by: Bathrobespierre on February 11, 2010 at 2:20 PM | PERMALINK

Here's a good read about RFID chips from 2006. Last cell phone I had allowed the user to turn off GPS tracking. Perhaps newer ones don't, but check your menu options.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/07/10/rfid/

Posted by: Dave on February 11, 2010 at 2:20 PM | PERMALINK

I second Mikey. I moved to VA a year ago, and I feel like I've been living in an alternate reality. My daughter is actually prohibited from sleeping over at friends' houses because she admitted we are athiests. My employer is way behind the curve of current thinking and trends that are status quo in the Northeast. Attitudes toward Barack Obama scare me.

Plus, I can't get decent pizza down here.

I'm moving back ASAP.

Posted by: bella on February 11, 2010 at 2:24 PM | PERMALINK

Any bills to protect our precious bodily fluids yet?

Posted by: ChicagoPat on February 11, 2010 at 2:29 PM | PERMALINK

Dear State of Virginia Stoopid-folk:

I am neither a physician nor an insurance company. However, I am going to personally install a microchip in each and every one of you teabagging fools who dares set so much as one toe in Ohio.

Ever again.

By the way---you've got Revelations all wrong. "Rapture" was a misinterpretation of "rupture", which is what God's gonna do to all the self-anointed Pharisees running about and pretending to be Christians. You'll all be like little soap-bubbles in a cactus field....

Posted by: S. Waybright on February 11, 2010 at 2:39 PM | PERMALINK

Sure the antichrist angle is stupid but I'm actually excited to see congress try to be proactive and get laws passed about issues BEFORE the problems start. Chipping people isn't some pie in the sky idea it's already done (voluntarily) and it really doesn't require much imagination to see mandatory chipping start happening.

Posted by: Tlaloc on February 11, 2010 at 3:05 PM | PERMALINK

Next up: a resolution banning black cats to prevent the practice of witchcraft.

Posted by: The Virginia House of Delegates on February 11, 2010 at 3:13 PM | PERMALINK

Why do they need microchips implanted? Can't they just track the chips in your credit cards in your wallet? Or the magnetic strips on the currency in same? The threats loom all around.

Posted by: J. Frank Parnell on February 11, 2010 at 3:29 PM | PERMALINK

The irony here is that draconian measures such as these are plausible if we do not take our nation back from the corporations and their Christian enablers! I've been telling my fellow yokels (most of them, Christian Fundamentalists) nigh on 25 years that it is they who are enabling wealth and power to concentrate to such absurd proportions.

Posted by: JTK on February 11, 2010 at 4:46 PM | PERMALINK

Scene: a swank hotel in the Carribean.
Characters: James Bond, M, and guy with a briefcase.
Action: Man pulls out hypo out of briefcase and points at at Bond's arm.

Bond: What's that a microchip so you can tell where I am and rescue me?
M: Exactly. Hold still.

Bond thrashes around shouts: No its a plot so you can prevent me from entering the kingdom of heaven when the rapture comes. Microchips ARE the mark of the Beast.

M nodds at man with hypo. Man pulls out gun, shoots James Bond. Who looks at M with a question in his eyes.

M: Bye James. That kind of insane supersition may be good for a Legislator in America, but Her Majesty's Government has no use agent who incapable of rational thinking.

M: and by the way. Had you not been shown to be such a mental kook, your next assignment would ahve been to investigate rumors that the American Republican Party is using the tactics of the Soviets in their attempt to break down the Obama Administrattion. If it works there, it may work other places and their strategy that "A lie told enough times may become the truth" is dangerous nt only for America but for the Commonwealth as well. But, alas, you were to insane to see that, so you had to "retire."

Posted by: Kurt on February 11, 2010 at 4:47 PM | PERMALINK

Bathrobespierre,

Remember that fundamentalists believe in a "literal reading" of the Bible - the Scofield Reference Bible, that is. (They usually claim the King James, but most of their beliefs, such as the Rapture or the singular Antichrist. are only found in Scofield's footnotes).

In this case, Scofield's footnotes for Revelation 13:16, indicate that the multiple antichrists of John are predecessors of the Antichrist, who is identified with the Beast.

http://www.searchgodsword.org/com/srn/view.cgi?book=re&chapter=13

Scofield's notes are largely based on a rather twisted interpretation of the Bible (called Dispensationalism) invented by one John Darby in the 19th Century.

Posted by: Redwood Rhiadra on February 11, 2010 at 5:24 PM | PERMALINK

Hope this could be worked out earlier. The Virginia government should do something.

Posted by: Virginia Resident on February 11, 2010 at 9:53 PM | PERMALINK

"Last cell phone I had allowed the user to turn off GPS tracking. Perhaps newer ones don't, but check your menu options"

Yep, I'm sure that'll be every bit as effective as pushing the "Pedestrian Crossing" button at the intersection redlight or pushing the "Close Doors" button on the elevator. Another bright shiny thing to keep us distracted ;-)

Posted by: loco moco on February 12, 2010 at 10:33 AM | PERMALINK

I think it should be illegal for anyone or any agency to VOLUNTARILY or INVOLUNTARILY plant a microchip in a human being, especially a citizen of the United States..supposedly a free country based on a constitution of independence.

Posted by: Jan on February 14, 2010 at 4:32 PM | PERMALINK

[recently discovered this web article]

PRETRIB RAPTURE SECRECY

by Dave MacPherson


The word "secrecy" when applied to Christ's return can refer to two different things: time and visibility. Before 1830 the only coming Christians looked for was the "every eye shall see him" second advent to earth - secret only in point of time.
Enter Margaret Macdonald in 1830. She saw "the one taken and the other left" before "THE WICKED" [Antichrist] will "be revealed" - and added that her pretrib rapture would not be "seen by the natural eye" but only by "those who have the light of God within." Her rapture was doubly secret: at an unknown day and hour and also invisible to "outsiders."
Desperate to eliminate Margaret as the pretrib originator and the Irvingites as the first public teachers of pretrib, Darby defender Thomas Ice foolishly claims that they taught a secret POSTTRIB coming even though he knows that when Hal Lindsey teaches "one taken" etc. before the Antichrist "is revealed" Lindsey is expressing the kernel of the pretrib view - what MM and the Irvingites clearly taught before Darby did! Google "X-Raying Margaret" and "Edward Irving is Unnerving" to see why they are properly labeled "pretrib.")
As early as June 1832, Irving's journal taught that only "to those who are watching and praying...will Christ be manifested...as the morning star. To the rest of the church, and to the world, this first appearance will be...unintelligible." ("Present State of Prophetic Knowledge" etc., p. 374)
Always trailing and "borrowing" quietly from the Irvingites who in turn had "borrowed" from Margaret, Darby in 1845 finally sounded like them when he wrote that "the bright and morning Star...is the sweet and blessed sign to them that watch...And such is Christ before He appears [at the final advent to earth]. The Sun will arise on the world....The star is before the [Sun], the joy of those who watch. The unwakeful world, who sleep in the night, see it not." ("Thoughts on the Apocalypse," p. 167)
And Lindsey's "Late Great Planet Earth," p. 143, says that "the second coming is said to be visible to the whole earth (Revelation 1:7). However, in the Rapture. only the Christians see Him - it's a mystery, a secret."
My bestselling book "The Rapture Plot" (available at online stores including Armageddon Books) has 300 pages of such documentation and proves that Margaret was the first to "see" a secret, pretrib rapture, that the Irvingites soon echoed her in their journal (which Darby admitted he avidly read), and that Darby was last on all of the crucial aspects of dispensationalism.
Shockingly, all of the earliest pretrib development rested solely on unclear OT and NT types and symbols and NOT on clear Biblical statements. Margaret's rapture was inspired by Rev. 11's "two witnesses." And her "secret visibility" rested on the "types" of Stephen, Paul, and John - all of whom saw or heard what others couldn't see or hear.
For 30 years Darby's pretrib basis was the rapture of Rev. 12's "man child" - actually his plagiarism of Irving's usage of this "pretrib" symbol eight years earlier!
As I said at the start, the "second advent to earth" is secret in point of time with its unknown "day and hour," as Christ stated. Pretribs assert that if Christ returns for the church after the tribulation, we could count down the days and figure out the actual date of His return - which would contradict Christ's words.
But pretribs deliberately ignore the fact that Christ said that the tribulation days will be shortened - and He didn't reveal the length of the shortening!
Our opponents also assume that the "watch" verses prove the "any-moment imminence" of Christ's return. But do they? II Peter 3:12 says we are to be "looking for and hasting unto the coming of the day of God" which all premills claim is at least 1000 years ahead of us and therefore hardly "imminent"! What's the difference between "watching for" and "looking for"?
You have just learned a few of the many secrets that the Secret Rapture Gang has hidden for a long time. Evidently they have forgotten Luke 12:2's warning that "there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed"!
PS - For the ultimate in uncovered secrets, see engines like Google and type in "Pretrib Rapture Dishonesty."

Posted by: Rudy on February 21, 2010 at 9:25 PM | PERMALINK




 

 

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