Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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April 7, 2010

ANOTHER SETBACK FOR GOP MINORITY OUTREACH.... Shortly after the 2008 presidential election, Sophia Nelson, a former congressional staffer and a black Republican, had an op-ed piece lamenting the fact that her party seems wholly disinterested in minority outreach.

I thought about Nelson's piece after seeing the latest moves from Virginia's new Republican leadership. (via TS)

Gov. Robert F. McDonnell, reviving a controversy that had been dormant for eight years, has declared that April will be Confederate History Month in Virginia, a move that angered civil rights leaders Tuesday but that political observers said would strengthen his position with his conservative base. [...]

The seven-paragraph declaration calls for Virginians to "understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War."

McDonnell had quietly made the proclamation Friday by placing it on his Web site, but it did not attract attention in the state capital until Tuesday.

McDonnell apparently went out of his way to make his declaration as insulting as possible. Virginia's last two governors -- Democrats Mark Warner and Tim Kaine -- scrapped the practice of annual Confederate resolutions altogether, while Virginia's last Republican governor, Jim Gilmore, included anti-slavery language in his resolution. McDonnell turned back the clock, honoring those who fought against the United States, and neglecting entirely to mention slavery.

Adam Serwer noted, "[N]ot only does McDonnell venerate those who took up arms against their own country, he does so without acknowledging that the institution for which they fought was the right to preserve the right to own human beings as slaves. He then papers over the horrors of reconstruction, lynching, and Jim Crow that followed."

Del. Kenneth Cooper Alexander (D), chairman of Virginia's Legislative Black Caucus, added, "Governor McDonnell's proclamation was offensive and offered a disturbing revision of the Civil War and the brutal era that followed. Virginia has worked hard to move beyond the very things for which Governor McDonnell seems nostalgic."

James McPherson, dean of Civil War scholars, described McDonnell's proclamation as "obnoxious."

I'd just add McDonnell, a graduate of radical TV preacher Pat Robertson's college, was only too pleased to present himself to voters last year as a relative moderate. Indeed, the governor capitalized on friendly support (though not an official endorsement) from former Virginia Gov. Doug Wilder (D), the first African-American governor in the nation since Reconstruction.

But the facade didn't last after McDonnell's inauguration. It's the funny thing about conservative Republicans who downplay their ideology to get elected -- they invariably stop pretending just as soon as they're in positions of authority.

Steve Benen 8:35 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (52)

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Comments

This suggests 1) an actual conservative, who doesn't feel the need to send out racist dog-whistles would be hard to beat in Virginia, 2) there is no such person.

Posted by: MattF on April 7, 2010 at 8:44 AM | PERMALINK

Taking Virginia back to the old days, there must be some Virginians with brains intact to see what is going on, if not, the inmates have just taken over the asylum.

Posted by: JS on April 7, 2010 at 8:44 AM | PERMALINK

Republicans frequently scoff and belittle such things as "Black History Month", "Women's History Month," or "Gay/Lesbian History Month" and libburul Political Correctness run amok. "We're all Americans," they loudly proclaim, "Why divide us along these lines? You all just revel in your victimhood." So now we see this?

What's next...... Affirmative Action for Daughters and Sons of the Confederacy? Quotas based on who your great-great-great-great grandfather fought for in the War of Northern Aggression? Re-definition of "Marriage" to allow cousins to wed as long as they're offspring of Confederate soldiers?

Posted by: Eeyore on April 7, 2010 at 8:45 AM | PERMALINK

"understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War."

Sacrifices like giving up their slaves. Oh Yeah.

Confederate Memorial Day is a state holiday here and is just around the corner. I can hardly wait. The Nobel Causers are the 19th Century version of the tea party. But with real tea. And hoop skirts.

Posted by: martin on April 7, 2010 at 8:47 AM | PERMALINK

As it is that a branch of my family is from the venerable state of West Virginia, and as it also is that many members of that branch overtly refused to take up arms as part of the Confederacy---and were politically active in the Northwestern Counties' subsequent secession from that Confederacy (not to mention that more than a few of them never took off "the blue uniform" in the first place)---I will most assuredly participate in Mr. McDonnell's celebration.

It just won't be quite the participation Mr. McDonnell is expecting....

Posted by: S. Waybright on April 7, 2010 at 8:50 AM | PERMALINK

Northerners fail to understand the importance in recognizing those who fought against the 'War of Northern Aggression'. As we move forward, it is critical that we continue to recognize the sacrifices and heroism of our Southern leaders, military, and citizens who resisted the northern aggression.

All that we seek is a return to our country's roots, as were put forth in the constitution. We seek only to abrogate the radical changes made to our forefathers intent. To prove that we are not radicals in this day and age, we are willing to accept only the repeals of the 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th and 19th amendments.

Posted by: ConfederateFlagForever on April 7, 2010 at 8:53 AM | PERMALINK

So i'm thinking what an idiot! Then I thought with this act he could please the regular republicans (reviving tradition ), the tea party (another celebration of states rights), and the racists (3/5 of a human). While everyone else is outraged, the people this is aimed at pleasing will ignore the negative press and think themselves unfairly villified. Twisted, these folks are seriously twisted.

Posted by: KurtRex1453 on April 7, 2010 at 8:54 AM | PERMALINK

I am glad I don't live in Virginia.

Posted by: Ron Byers on April 7, 2010 at 8:59 AM | PERMALINK

I think you used "disinterested" when you meant "uninterested."

Posted by: Virginia on April 7, 2010 at 9:01 AM | PERMALINK

When the inevitable commenter starts to wail "State's Rights" please remember the Fugitive Slave Act, wherein federal officials could seize escaped slaves (property) from states that had banned slavery in complete disregard to that state's rights.

Then again, Alexander Stephens (Vice President of the Confederacy) said is straight out in his Cornerstone speech in May 1861:

"Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner- stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition."

For such are proclamations in Virginia made.

Posted by: Mudge on April 7, 2010 at 9:02 AM | PERMALINK

Sacrifices like giving up their slaves. Oh Yeah.

Well that and taking a minié ball from the rifle I've got mounted over the fireplace. I consider their sacrifice every time I look at it and I feel proud that my ancestors, my southern ancestors, had the good sense and common decency to fight for the Union (like most everyone else from eastern Tennessee).

Posted by: Sarcastro on April 7, 2010 at 9:05 AM | PERMALINK

To the extent that the CSA rank and file were not slave holders and did not necessarily fight to preserve that odious institution, this sentimentalism is instructive; today's T-partiers exhibit equal parts ignorance and vehement acceptance of corporate/monied talking points, and are consequently a good analog.

Posted by: jhm on April 7, 2010 at 9:06 AM | PERMALINK

The civil war ended almost 150 years ago. Isn't it time to let it go?

Posted by: Gandalf on April 7, 2010 at 9:07 AM | PERMALINK

They got some funny notions down there in the Anti-American states.

Ever notice how "states' rights" is always about the individual states arrogating to themselves the right to treat one arbitrary group of people worse than some other arbitrary group of people?

Posted by: Cap'n Chucky on April 7, 2010 at 9:10 AM | PERMALINK

So I guess the only history allowed is what the left and minorities deem as ok?

Posted by: bulldog on April 7, 2010 at 9:12 AM | PERMALINK

"So I guess the only history allowed is what the left and minorities deem as ok?"

Hey, go with it, bulldog. Why not celebrate other traditions of Southern culture like the KKK, lynching and segregated lunch counters?

I think it is perfectly OK for folks like you to celebrate the subjugation of African-Americans. It will assure perpetual minority status for your party.

Posted by: Joel on April 7, 2010 at 9:19 AM | PERMALINK

This is an opportunity to double down on the event. All of the photos of lynchings, whippings and any of the other positives of slavery should be shown during Confederate Month. That's what they fought for.

Posted by: pokeybob on April 7, 2010 at 9:20 AM | PERMALINK

Confederate Memorial Day? Sounds like a good time to raise a glass to William Sherman, if you ask me...

Posted by: BruceK on April 7, 2010 at 9:22 AM | PERMALINK

Gandalf, Gov. McDonnell isn't concerned about the civil war that ended 150 years ago. He is trying to position himself a leader in what the tea partiers perceive to be a coming revolution. To do that he has to curry favor with the old white boomers who think that life and history will pass them by if they don't reassert the power slipping from their fingers.

The fact is the boomers have been in decline for a long time. They suffered a lot under the Bush regime. A lot of them lost their jobs to the Chinese and Indians. They haven't seen a raise in the last 15 years. Most of them haven't saved a thing for retirement. They are frightened. They don't know who to blame. They are blaming that black guy in the White House and liberals because they can't bear to blame the conservatives who passed some laws and repealed others that allowed American wealth to drain away.
Anyway those nice blond people on Fox News tell them that the black guy is to blame.

Scary times.
This next decade could be noisy as the boomers refuse to go quietly into that good night.

Posted by: Ron Byers on April 7, 2010 at 9:23 AM | PERMALINK

"I'm glad I don't live in Virginia"

Mr Byers, you stand tall in Progressive circles, but, as a Jayhawk, may I remind you, sir, of the tarnished past of the Show Me State in the Border War, especially in the destruction of lives in Lawrence and the support of ever so many living in that state for their co-operation with Confederate forces.

However, as to choosing April, yes, it is the month of the firing on Ft Sumter. But, Governor McDonnell, it is, also, the month of Appomattox. Suggest you change it to either July or August, thereby, you can glory in either the First or Second Bull Run, or as you would say, Manasses.

Posted by: berttheclock on April 7, 2010 at 9:24 AM | PERMALINK

If you live in the South as I do, and especially if you become part of an old Southern family, as I have, you realize how complicated the role of slavery and the Confederacy has been in shaping the South to this day. So I don't have any problem with the notion that we ought to study the history of the South or of the Confederacy, as, I am sure, most universities and historians agree. The problem with this "proclamation" is that it isn't simply a wish to study, but expresses a point of view that veers towards admiration of southern "sacrifice" without any context of the purpose and result of that sacrifice, which obviously included the continuation of slavery, but it also included a continuation of a culture that emphasized qualities like "honor" and "class" and that devalued other qualities, like curiosity and achievement. It's embarrassing, even if I didn't vote for the guy.

Posted by: Barbara on April 7, 2010 at 9:29 AM | PERMALINK

Man, these idiots just keep digging themselves deeper and deeper into the parody hole with each passing day. I'm beginning to think that pretty soon even the Mainstream Media is going to have to come to terms with the reality that these guys really are stark raving mad.

Posted by: Patrick Star on April 7, 2010 at 9:39 AM | PERMALINK

The South LOST. Get. Fucking. Over. It.

No one alive was alive then to tell the stories. Few if any one alive likely had someone with first hand accounts telling the stories. The southern economic system was not something to be proud of. The Civil War, War Between the States or whatever it is called was not a glorious cause. These people are basically lauding the days when their entire economic system was based on the backs (literally) of people that were exploited and bought and sold. This is not something to be proud of. It is something to be acknowledged.

I am from the south and am so freaking tired of this I just can't stand it.

A Republican governor of a southern state brings this up and Republicans wonder why so few African Americans want to join their party when so many in their party seem to go out of their way to bring this shit up over and over again.

Posted by: ET on April 7, 2010 at 9:48 AM | PERMALINK

Yeah, I hope Wilder and that BET executive, or whoever she was, are happy with themselves now.

Live and learn the hard way Virginia voters, you just elected a bigoted confederate sympathizer.
Why people were willing to ignore the many warning signs is always amazing to me.

Posted by: whatever on April 7, 2010 at 9:52 AM | PERMALINK

So I guess the only history allowed is what the left and minorities deem as ok?

Oh we should definitely be studying the history, just not setting aside a month clearly intended to honor traitors who fought to maintain slavery.
Or do actually think we should?

Posted by: whatever on April 7, 2010 at 9:57 AM | PERMALINK

"The civil war ended almost 150 years ago. Isn't it time to let it go?"

Amen, Gandalf.

Posted by: June on April 7, 2010 at 10:08 AM | PERMALINK

Why people were willing to ignore the many warning signs is always amazing to me.

I blame the media quite a lot. McDonnell got a pass for so much, and I won't be surprised if it happens again this time.

All through the campaign, evidence would surface of his support for some retrograde position, and he would put out evidence about his family or staff showing that he doesn't personally treat people that way, and the collective reaction would be "oh, that's okay then, he must not really believe that."

It was infuriating. He wasn't running for dad, he was running for governor, and if he thought government should pursue a social conservative agenda, it shouldn't matter that he didn't have a history of enforcing it personally against people he knew.

It happened again last month when he replaced the previous administrations' the executive orders about discrimination so that it didn't include LGBT folks. There was an uproar, and he issued a non-binding executive directive discouraging such discrimination, and it was widely reported that he had reversed his decision, but actually he had just done a formal version of the same slick act that got him through the campaign.

Maybe people will get wise to it as some point, and maybe it will even get through the even thicker skulls of our political media. But I doubt it.

Posted by: Redshift on April 7, 2010 at 10:22 AM | PERMALINK

So without getting into the whole issue of veneration of the imaginary Confederacy invented by Hollywood and the Daughters of the Confederacy--which is one of my favorite topics--here's what I really don't get.

Was McDonnell's whole "I'm a moderate, really" act something that was just swollowed hook, line and sinker by an electorate that wasn't really paying attention, or was it just the fig leaf that allowed people who wanted someone just like he really is in office but didn't want to admit it to their friends to vote for him?

The Republicans run this "I'm a moderate, trust me" scam over an over again--most famously with George W. Bush and pretty much continuiously whenever they try to push one of their extremists onto the national stage. I mean, George Allen, fer cripes sake, ran this scam. And yet, a number of people seem to fall for it, time and again. It just leads one to conclude that no one's really being fooled and that it's all just a pitch designed to give coter to people who don't have enough integrity to admit they really like hateful wingnuts.

Posted by: Steve (Not That One) on April 7, 2010 at 10:23 AM | PERMALINK

As a former Virginia resident that lived through the last GOP political wave in the Commonwealth, all I can say is that this is right out of the standard playbook. It is pretty simple. You get elected governor by campaigning as a business-oriented moderate, and then you switch, and govern from the right once you get into office. Because it is now payback time - and in this case, McDonnell owes Pat Robertson and the religious right a massive debt for promoting and building up his career. They want their culture war, and they want it NOW.

People forget how extreme George Allen and Jim Gilmore were during their respective terms as governor - when they were doing things like refusing to enforce federal environmental laws on state's rights grounds, or when they were trashing the Commonwealth's public university system (where they did some really serious damage).

Same old game. Do something vicious and destructive and divisive, and then smirk (and rake in the campaign dough). When McDonnell gets criticized for this, as he inevitably will, he will play victim, express shock at the intolerance of his critics for southern heritage (who he will probably call left-wing extremists), and milk the provocation for all it is worth.

Posted by: Bokonon on April 7, 2010 at 10:33 AM | PERMALINK

McDonnell is quickly showing himself to be the quintessential white privilege protagonist in our early 21st century social dialog - too bad he wants to use 17th century intellect and 19th century emotion to do so! -Kevo

Posted by: kevo on April 7, 2010 at 10:48 AM | PERMALINK

No wonder they hate Obama, he is trying to drag them kicking and screaming into the 21st century.

Posted by: Joan on April 7, 2010 at 10:56 AM | PERMALINK

When the money dries up the RNC will throw Steele out. If they raised more money this March than in any previous March change isn't likely to happen - unless of course Steele has a stripper pole installed in his office.

Posted by: rrk1 on April 7, 2010 at 10:56 AM | PERMALINK

So I guess the only history allowed is what the left and minorities deem as ok?

Oh, don't worry, I'm teaching my first graders about the Confederates. I'm teaching them that there once were people in America that thought it was OK to own other people and make them do all sorts of very dangerous and very hard work otherwise they would punish the slaves or shoot them. They had a hard time believing this. I told them that there was a big war and that President Lincoln was shot by one of them who wanted to keep people as slaves.

Then, when they've a bit older, I'll take them to Arlington Cemetary where their and my ancestors were buried who fought to keep these racist traitors from destroying our country.

Posted by: ericblair on April 7, 2010 at 11:01 AM | PERMALINK

This thread needs a soundtrack

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VsE9T4Sr30

Posted by: Ab on April 7, 2010 at 11:06 AM | PERMALINK

The seven-paragraph declaration calls for Virginians to "understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War."

Looks like my ancestors didn't make these unrepentant SOUTHERN TRAITORS suffer enough.

Sadly, it looks like we'll have to review that situation in the near future.

Posted by: TCinLA on April 7, 2010 at 11:15 AM | PERMALINK

I consider their sacrifice every time I look at it and I feel proud that my ancestors, my southern ancestors, had the good sense and common decency to fight for the Union (like most everyone else from eastern Tennessee).

Yes, this month might be a very good time to remember these folks, and not just those in Tennessee, but those in northern Georgia, northern Alabama and northern Mississippi, as well as eastern Kentucky. These are the mountain folks, who the rest of the slaveowning South looked down on - they were the ones who migrated down the Appalachians from Pennsylvania, rather than up from the lowlands. In Alabama, they forced three elections on the subject of secession, which in the end only won by a bare majority after a campaign of terrorism against the northern counties. A similar event happened in Mississippi. During the War of Southern Treason, 100,000 of these folks fought their way to the northern lines (there was a county-by-county miniature civil war in Alabama) and served with distinction - the most important of which was the 2nd Alabama Cavalry, US Volunteers, the first unsegregated Army unit in the US Army and the only one for another 84 years, who were so good they formed Sherman's bodyguard during the March to the Sea. With the example of West Virginia, in 1862-63 there was a movement of these mountain people in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee to form "the free state of Nickajack."

Sadly, the true history of the real South has been hijacked by the Unreconstructed Traitors and their Hollywood sympathizers who think the true story of the Civil War was shown in the movies "Birth of a Nation," "Gone With The Wind" and all the other pro-South movies that have been made over the years ("Raintree County," "Cold Mountain"), and those who were truly loyal patriots have been largely forgotten.

Posted by: TCinLA on April 7, 2010 at 11:29 AM | PERMALINK

Steve (Not That One), @10:23,

Door number two: the plausible cover for one's real sentiments. And it didn't help that Deeds ran the most unfocused and tone-deaf campaign I ever witnessed (until Coakley upped the stakes).

People forget how extreme George Allen and Jim Gilmore were during their respective terms as governor - when they were doing things like refusing to enforce federal environmental laws on state's rights grounds,[...] -- Bokonon, @10:33

And history is repeating itself there, too. Everyone's talking about the suit the Cuckoo has filed against the health insurance reform but he's also fled another one -- against EPA. And, sure as sure, that's being done in concert with little Bobby McD, not a wild start of his own.

Posted by: exlibra on April 7, 2010 at 11:30 AM | PERMALINK

To the extent that the CSA rank and file were not slave holders and did not necessarily fight to preserve that odious institution,

After Gettysburg, it became more and more that the only way the traitors could fill their ranks was with pressgangs. Another bit of Southern Mythology, that the poor whites fought for Ol' Massa willingly right to the last. The unfortunate thing was that these people were too used to knuckling their brow to ol' Massa before the war, so they let it continue to happen while their racism was whipped up with demagoguery after the war.

Posted by: TCinLA on April 7, 2010 at 11:33 AM | PERMALINK

Keep in mind, this is also the state that insisted on turning Martin Luther King Day into "Lee/Jackson/King Day." Meaning a day set aside to remember the contributions of Confederate General Robert E Lee, Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, and Civil Rights Activist Martin Luther King Jr. What's not to love about that? Everybody's happy, right?

Meanwhile, I'm interested to see when Germany sets aside an entire month to remember its "Heroes of the Third Reich." I know it's not the same thing. But, Jesus, could my home state get any more stupid?

Posted by: chrenson on April 7, 2010 at 11:37 AM | PERMALINK

When people wonder why tea-partiers are out there defending the wealthy corporate elite, remember that hundreds of thousands of southerners DIED defending the wealthy corporate elite of that time, otherwise known as estate holding slaveowners.

Using race and cultural issues to have poor and working class whites defend the interests of the wealthy is NOT new in this country. We shouldn't forget that.

Posted by: Archon on April 7, 2010 at 11:44 AM | PERMALINK

Archon, true that. It's that authoritarian follower mentality all over again. "As long as someone in charge tells me who I should be afraid of, who I should hate, and who I should kill, I will do exactly as they say."

Posted by: chrenson on April 7, 2010 at 11:51 AM | PERMALINK

All the suckers who bought into the notion that a graduate of Pat Robertson's "university" would be a moderate . . . . what maroons. And by law he can't run for another term, so get ready for an unending string of pandering handouts to the extremely conservative state GOP base, so he can wrap up their Senatorial nomination at the end of his term.

It's amazing how many times Virginia "Independents" can be suckered by the same old bait and switch routine without getting wise. I guess "Independent" is synonymous with "Uninformed" or "Unobservant" or "Hopelessly Gullible."

Posted by: Jon on April 7, 2010 at 12:15 PM | PERMALINK

"understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War."

He's covered everyone but the Confederate slaves. Must have been a typo, right?

Posted by: Jon on April 7, 2010 at 12:17 PM | PERMALINK

@exlibra, you said it! I mean, that car tax sucks, but the $4bn hole Gilmore blew in the budget trying to get rid of it sucks more. Still dealing with that.

I won't even start on their treatment of higher ed. The state institutions are so desperate they have to resort to *selling the bricks of demolished dorms to former residents*. ("For a donation of $200-300, you can have your very own Dobie brick, before they're gone forever!" Real solicitation.)

But the first thing I thought of when I heard about this was, "Hey, from one carpetbagger to anohter: thanks AGAIN, Terry McAuliffe, for splitting the Dem primary and leaving us with that milquetoast Deeds. THANKS!"

Posted by: ajw93 on April 7, 2010 at 12:45 PM | PERMALINK

Meanwhile, I'm interested to see when Germany sets aside an entire month to remember its "Heroes of the Third Reich." -Posted by: chrenson

Or how about Japan's "War Against Western Agression" month?

Posted by: 2Manchu on April 7, 2010 at 1:06 PM | PERMALINK

Boycott Virginia

Posted by: MissMudd on April 7, 2010 at 1:09 PM | PERMALINK

To TCinLA and Sarcastro - thanks for your posts. You bring up a very interesting side of history I'd like to learn more about.

Posted by: June on April 7, 2010 at 1:23 PM | PERMALINK

From the desk of
Robert McDonnell, Governor of the CommonWealth of Virginia
Richmond, VA

April 2, 2010

TO:
Voters of the Commonwealth of Virginia


MEMO:
====

Sike!!!!

Posted by: toowearyforoutrage on April 7, 2010 at 2:10 PM | PERMALINK

TooWearyForOutrage,

It's easy to see that your memo "from the desk of Bob McDonnell" is a forgery. It has the equals sign in it right after the word "MEMO". Bob McDonnell had the equals sign key removed from all state computers in Virginia the day he took office.

Posted by: chrenson on April 7, 2010 at 2:18 PM | PERMALINK

For my money, one of the greatest generals of the war was a Virginian and son of a slave-owning family: George Thomas. He truly was one the great heroes of the war because of the price he paid personally and professionally because of his allegiance to the United States (as opposed to that other general from Virginia, who chose differently and caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands as a result). His family disowned him, even after the war, because of his pro-union stance. And he was viewed with suspicion by many in the Union establishment and passed over for higher command as a result even though the war in the west would have been a longer, and more difficult struggle without his efforts.

If Gov. Robert McDonnell wants to use Confederate History Month to highlight Thomas and other patriotic Virginians who made the right decision, then I say go for it. However, I doubt he will. BTW, Every Confederate state except South Carolina provided regiments for the Union army, a little-known fact.

And if you really want to do justice to the Confederate cause, McDonnell ought to read the declaration of causes passed by various Southern legislatures (along with their ordinances of secession) on the steps of the state capitol so there is no doubt that the only state right that the south fought for was the right to enslave. Somehow I doubt he'll do that.

Posted by: mudwall jackson on April 7, 2010 at 2:38 PM | PERMALINK

This just reminds me of something that I concluded at the turn of the millenium: progressives want to leave the 20th century behind and proceed into the 21st century. Conservatives and the GOP want to leave the 20th century behind... and return to the "good old days" of the 19th century.

Posted by: josef on April 7, 2010 at 3:44 PM | PERMALINK

Is McConnell setting the stage for the great bigot, George Allen, to make a political comeback?

Posted by: Ted76 on April 7, 2010 at 5:31 PM | PERMALINK




 

 

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