Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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April 20, 2010

WHAT'S WITH THE GOP AND MICROCHIPS?.... This report, from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Jim Galloway, is disconcerting on its face, but it also raises questions about the larger connection between conservatives and their microchip-related concerns.

Last week, the Georgia House Judiciary Committee held a hearing to consider a Republican proposal to "prohibit the involuntary implantation of microchips in human beings." I'm not entirely sure what the point is -- it's not as if there's been an outbreak of involuntary microchip implantation -- but GOP officials nationwide have a tendency to worry about imaginary threats, so I suppose this shouldn't be too surprising.

The legislative hearing led to remarks from a local woman, who claimed to have personal experience on the matter.

"I'm also one of the people in Georgia who has a microchip," the woman said. Slowly, she began to lead the assembled lawmakers down a path they didn't want to take. [...]

She spoke of the "right to work without being tortured by co-workers who are activating these microchips by using their cell phones and other electronic devices."

She continued. "Microchips are like little beepers. Just imagine, if you will, having a beeper in your rectum or genital area, the most sensitive area of your body. And your beeper numbers displayed on billboards throughout the city. All done without your permission," she said.

It was not funny, and no one laughed.

When a lawmaker asked her to clarify as to whether she's been implanted with a microchip, the woman said that she did, and that it was involuntarily put in her body by the U.S. Department of Defense.

The state lawmakers politely thanked the woman for her time, and proceeded to vote in support of the proposal.

And that's really the point I'm curious about. We talked in February about an identical effort among Republicans in Virginia's House of Delegates, where a GOP lawmaker sought to prohibit involuntary microchip implantation in order to help save humanity from the antichrist. His proposal passed.

Indeed, there are now three states -- and counting -- that have instituted bans on involuntary microchip implantation. Georgia will likely become the fourth. At the same time, some conservatives are apparently concerned about non-existent microchip-related provisions in the Affordable Care Act.

Was there some kind of memo about the dangers of microchips at some point? Where did all of these concerns come from? I like to think I keep up fairly well on far-right rhetoric, but all of this seems to be popping up around the same time, out of the blue.

Steve Benen 3:55 PM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (74)

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Comments

It looks like the GOP just locked up the tinfoil hat vote.

Posted by: Stetson Kennedy on April 20, 2010 at 3:52 PM | PERMALINK

It's just more hyper-religiosity from the end-times crowd. A micro-chip will eventually reveal the "mark of the beast" depicted in Revelation. Of course, they used to say that about social security numbers, too.

Posted by: Michael W on April 20, 2010 at 3:52 PM | PERMALINK

Republicans can enjoy their new role as the party joined by the microchip-paranoid fringe thanks to their willingness to be seen as the Party Against Science. When all science takes a backseat to religion, becoming the Neo-Luddites is the logical extension.

There was a time when the cosmopolitan centers of Islam set the pace for the world in science and math. Now they are impoversihed towns of dust, full of self-proclaimed Islamic leaders railing against modernity and using improvised bombs to ensure societies move toward the 12th century, not the 22nd.

Any similarities are not merely coincidental.

Posted by: zeitgeist on April 20, 2010 at 3:54 PM | PERMALINK

The Republican Party as an institution is truly insane. The kind of insanity that used to lead individuals to be locked up.

How did this happen? Are so many of its individual members insane that the organization reflects that? Or is their some kind of feedback cycle going on in which its leaders, having decided to pursue power at all costs, pick up on everything that frightens its most paranoid members, validates those fantasies and infects the previously sane?

Posted by: tanstaafl on April 20, 2010 at 3:57 PM | PERMALINK

It's far worse than you think:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iy1UU56c8uC5kNgiZz5luBw2jXHQD9F6U80O1

Posted by: Paul Dirks on April 20, 2010 at 3:59 PM | PERMALINK

Yeah, this has been a bête noire of the End-Times crowd since at least the 1980s. In this case, maybe it's just another dog whistle tactic to bolster fundamentalist support: it doesn't mean anything (but doesn't sound BAD) to mainstream Americans, but gives an immediate and recognizable "one of us" cue to theocrats.

Posted by: Matt Sandwich on April 20, 2010 at 3:59 PM | PERMALINK

But, how are we going to control the return of illegal aliens if we don't implant microchips into them to monitor their comings and goings? Or, is it only OK if they are non-citizens. So, apparently the law only concerns U.S. citizens...unless they are targeted for killing as national security threats. So, who, exactly, is exempt from the implantation of these devices into their genital and other private areas? Only white males of a certain class and financial standing?

Posted by: st john on April 20, 2010 at 4:01 PM | PERMALINK

Would it be over-the-top snark if I threatened to (1) move to Georgia, (2) live right next door to crazy-woman, (3) build a DoD-certified thermonuclear ion-pulse generator, and (4) aim the damned thing at her house?

I could, y'know....

Posted by: S. Waybright on April 20, 2010 at 4:01 PM | PERMALINK

The technology DOES exist...there's a company called VeriChip that makes it. There's been suggestions of possible use for medical emergencies (kind of like a internal medical bracelet) or for security access (like a military facility). There's no real-life examples as of yet...mostly because the technology has security problems (easy to clone, unlike a smartcard reader or proximity detector) and it's unclear what the big advantage is over something like a fingerprint scanner.

It's sort of like the North American highway urban legend...a grain of truth that gets spread on the internet. Helps that it jibes well with long-running fears of a national ID or other detection systems. Besides, if the government wants to know where you are, they'll target your iPhone.

Posted by: rashomon on April 20, 2010 at 4:02 PM | PERMALINK

It's not so much about microchips as it is about keeping their nether regions clear to receive other forms of input.

Posted by: BillFrom PA on April 20, 2010 at 4:07 PM | PERMALINK

Obama needs to implant the microchips so that he can keep track of the American patriots that he's rounding up and putting in FEMA detention camps. I know it's true because Glenn Beck told me so.

Posted by: ameshall on April 20, 2010 at 4:10 PM | PERMALINK

I think the microchip was implanted in Gillian Anderson's character in the X-Files movie, or was an element of the last season of that series---not that I think right wingers were X-File fans.

But of course there it was evidence of an
alien conspiracy to take over the earth, wasn't it?

Posted by: nancycadet on April 20, 2010 at 4:10 PM | PERMALINK

Someone I work with actually told me we need to be concerned about microchips being implanted in us. She also told me I need to watch "The Obama Deception". I don't know where this stuff comes from, but she really believes it.

Posted by: Gretchen on April 20, 2010 at 4:12 PM | PERMALINK

This is just sad, because one of the most common delusions that schizophrenics develop is that the government is monitoring them, usually by implanting something in their bodies.

This woman needs serious psychiatric help and probably medication, but instead her delusions are being validated by the Georgia legislature.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on April 20, 2010 at 4:12 PM | PERMALINK

I assume the link above is to the same story I found, about a mentally ill patient who killed three hospital workers after becoming convinced that his doctor had implanted a chip in him during an appendectomy surgery.

Stoking paranoia is not harmless. I really wish they would stop it.

Posted by: Barbara on April 20, 2010 at 4:13 PM | PERMALINK

This is nowhere near new. I remember anti-government and religious lunatics harping about "the mark of the beast" (at the time it was UPC codes, not chip implants) being implanted in/on you in the late 90's.

The difference, as the last year has clearly shown, is that it's a hell of a lot easier for these lunatics to reach the higher tiers of public discourse. This was always around; it's just being listened to because the Republican Party is riding a massive wave of conspiratorial rhetoric.

It's pretty much a dot-com boom for insanity right now.

Posted by: August J. Pollak on April 20, 2010 at 4:14 PM | PERMALINK

It looks like the GOP just locked up the tinfoil hat vote.

Strictly speaking, I'd say this is the tinfoil underpants vote.
Which might explain everything.

Posted by: dr2chase on April 20, 2010 at 4:14 PM | PERMALINK

I searched and searched and searched The Onion, but I couldn't find that story.

I tried slashdot and Mad Magazine on line (http://www.dccomics.com/mad/), It wasn't there either.

Bigfib.com? No.
http://www.borowitzreport.com/? Not there.

Wait. You mean this is REAL??!? An actual state legislature passed it? And not on April 1?

Ahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!

Beyond parody? Hell, they can't even see parody from there.

What a bunch a'maroons.

Posted by: efgoldman on April 20, 2010 at 4:14 PM | PERMALINK

In the days before microchips, it was dental fillings.
I knew a chap who insisted he heard alien radio broadcast through his fillings.

I know mental illness isn't contagious but the Georgia Legislature seems to be infected.

Posted by: evagrius on April 20, 2010 at 4:16 PM | PERMALINK

Micro potato-chips maybe.

Posted by: apeman on April 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM | PERMALINK

No, It's Time We All Had Them

Hey, the front page story on yesterday's paper was all about a cat who walked out of its Albuquerque home 8 months ago and wasn't seen again until it was picked up by Animal Control ... in Chicago. The little beast was identified by its embedded microchip and returned to its owner, thousands of miles away.

Without the chip, kitty would be just another euthanized stray.

More apropos - this could happen to Grandma. Too bad she won't have any fallback ID, given her dementia and carelessness with her possessions. Just another crazy woman wandering the streets...

And how about all those missing little children on the milk boxes and in the 1040 form packages? Too bad they didn't have embedded IDs; if they had been chipped, portals at any Post Office, public library, or school would be able to pick up their whereabouts and allow them to be returned to the rightful parent.

The trouble with the Republicoids these days is that none of them ever bother to think anymore.

Posted by: Zandru on April 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM | PERMALINK

I hope these people didn't hear the interview of Ray Kurzweil on BBC World Service this past Sunday. It would send them right over the edge. Check it out for some Borg-collective, wierd science, not-too-far-in-the-future stuff.

Posted by: skitso on April 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM | PERMALINK

This nonsense with involuntary chip implantation started amongst the fundamentalists in the '80s with the 'end of times' crowd, and it's gone mainstream.

Posted by: J on April 20, 2010 at 4:18 PM | PERMALINK

@ evagrius

Actually this isn't as silly as you'd think. Under certain circumstances, people *can* pick up broadcast frequencies on fillings, or protective plates in their skulls. Rare, but documented.

I worked in a radio station, and once in a while someone would say they heard the station in their head when they walked near the transmitter.

Posted by: efgolman on April 20, 2010 at 4:19 PM | PERMALINK

What's with the GOP always talking about stuff they don't want being put in their rectums?

Posted by: Shalimar on April 20, 2010 at 4:20 PM | PERMALINK

@skitzo

Which program was that? Could it have been Digital Planet?

Posted by: Zandru on April 20, 2010 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

My friend, who is mostly apolitical but credulous of conspiracies, mentioned forced microchip implantation to me earlier this year.

Posted by: Jamobey on April 20, 2010 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

Why the hell was the chip planted in the first place? Why would the department of defene order that to happen. Who's watch was it on when it was done. There had to be a reason. What was it?

Before we all go flying off the handle let's get some background...

Posted by: Stevio on April 20, 2010 at 4:22 PM | PERMALINK

Actually, in 2004, a small group of people in the Mexican Attorney General's office were implanted with an RIFD chip as both an effort to increase information security in the Department and an anti-kidnapping measure.

There have been recurring reports of various employers considering RIFD implants.

Also, US passports now include a chip. They are reportedly vulnerable to snooping and spoofing.

While this poor lady obviously has issues - just think about what your cell-phone says about you (location, calls, sites lookedup, text). None of us would have voluntarily disclosed this information to the Government or to random commercial interests.

Posted by: 22state on April 20, 2010 at 4:23 PM | PERMALINK

I think they need an amendment to create an exemption in the case of vampires. After all, it was only because he had a chip implanted in him that Spike was able to turn from evil to good on Buffy.

Posted by: jimBOB on April 20, 2010 at 4:24 PM | PERMALINK

Was there some kind of memo about the dangers of microchips at some point? Where did all of these concerns come from? I like to think I keep up fairly well on far-right rhetoric, but all of this seems to be popping up around the same time, out of the blue.

Apparently organized religion no longer functions as intended (keeping the rabble in line via fear of going to hell) so now it comes down to X Files paranoia and implanted microchips.

Posted by: Monty on April 20, 2010 at 4:24 PM | PERMALINK

What's with the GOP always talking about stuff they don't want being put in their rectums? Posted by: Shalimar

They need all the room for their heads, which are generally up there.


just think about what your cell-phone says about you (location, calls, sites lookedup, text). None of us would have voluntarily disclosed this information to the Government or to random commercial interests. Posted by: 22state

but in fact, in your example, we did voluntarily give that information and we do everytime we carry a cell phone (or GPS unit) with the power on. the key to all of this - including RFIDs -- is the "voluntary" part. There is not even one shred of evidence that anyone in government in the United States is seriously contemplating involuntary implantation of chips. There may be perfectly good reasons some people will do it voluntarily -- just like most of us make the cell phone trade-off, and scores of other privacy trade-offs every time we use technology or just get lazy about shredding paper documents.

Posted by: zeitgeist on April 20, 2010 at 4:27 PM | PERMALINK

For the Ray Kurzweil interview, go the the BBC World Service home page and look for the "Interview" program. It was aired on Sunday, April 18.

Posted by: skitso on April 20, 2010 at 4:27 PM | PERMALINK

Have not made up my mind about microchips, but, it would not be a bad idea for all RepuGs to be spayed and neutered.

Posted by: berttheclock on April 20, 2010 at 4:28 PM | PERMALINK

Fear works.

Posted by: Ohioan on April 20, 2010 at 4:29 PM | PERMALINK

This woman is clearly in need of psychiatric help for schizophrenia, and the legislature is not doing her any favors by lending credence to her delusions.

Posted by: doubtful on April 20, 2010 at 4:30 PM | PERMALINK

You know, these guys who want to ban implanting microchips into people are the same ones who are pushing for a standard national ID card that everyone has to have in their possession at all times. The current iteration of this is standardizing state driver's licenses to meet national specifications.

Posted by: Rick B on April 20, 2010 at 4:31 PM | PERMALINK

Its just full metal jacket, wingnut paranoia.

Posted by: bob h on April 20, 2010 at 4:32 PM | PERMALINK

There's no real-life examples as of yet...

That's what they want you to think. But I'm living this nightmare ever since an undercover fed posing as a podiatrist chipped me during a routine consultation about my arches. And all the people calling me batshit crazy don't seem to understand that it's not my own well-being I'm screaming about. I have no idea what this chip could be doing to my unborn child, conceived during my overnight kidnapping by aliens in late January.

Posted by: shortstop on April 20, 2010 at 4:36 PM | PERMALINK

August, you win the prize for the thread:

"It's pretty much a dot-com boom for insanity right now."

Too funny.

Posted by: Scott F. on April 20, 2010 at 4:36 PM | PERMALINK

I don't see how anyone can say that the woman's statement wasn't hilarious. I have no idea how the committee members kept from bursting out laughing.

Posted by: bos'n on April 20, 2010 at 4:39 PM | PERMALINK

A lot of this stuff started out with Katherine Albrecht. http://www.spychips.com/

Posted by: redbone on April 20, 2010 at 4:40 PM | PERMALINK

It isn't funny because mental illness isn't funny. What is both funny and terrifying is that the legislators were less afraid of being associated with her clearly delusional beliefs than alienating the anti-government base.

Posted by: T-Rex on April 20, 2010 at 4:43 PM | PERMALINK

A couple things:

1. These people who believe they're microchipped and are being controlled by their neighbors or whatever - they are schizophrenic. They're not run of the mill conspiracy theorists, they have an honest to god disease and require treatment.

2. This sort of bill is not as uncommon as you would think. When you work in a campaign office, you will invariably get mentally ill people calling up and complaining about the government beaming thoughts into their heads or whatever. In my experience, you are generally coached to agree with these people and tell them that your candidate will propose bills to stop this. Votes are votes, and it doesn't hurt to pass bills banning alien abductions or the like.

3. This is not confined to the right, not even a little. Search for "chemtrails" and "mind control":
http://www.fas.org/sgp/congress/2001/hr2977.html

Posted by: Jesus Fucking Christ, PhD on April 20, 2010 at 4:47 PM | PERMALINK
I knew a chap who insisted he heard alien radio broadcast through his fillings.

Hey! I can hear alien radio broadcasts through my fillings - I know they're aliens because they all have Canadian accents

Posted by: firefall on April 20, 2010 at 4:47 PM | PERMALINK

Well, I can't count, but my PhD ain't in counting.

Posted by: Jesus Fucking Christ, PhD on April 20, 2010 at 4:48 PM | PERMALINK

The actual forced implanting part is wacko, but the concern about government being able to track people and gather more information that ever before is a real concern. All new cell phones have gps devices in them that give their constant location -- whether turned on or not. So do new cars. Government has gotten around legal restrictions of formerly illegal collection of an individual's personal information thru passage of less restrictive laws, or when that doesn't work, simply buying data from corporations that do not have the government's restrictions.
The unreasonable fears of implantation is an irrational over-reaction to a more rational fear of the real danger from the government's increasing ability to monitor us.

Posted by: patrick on April 20, 2010 at 4:51 PM | PERMALINK

What I find astounding is that this woman made it through the vetting process ... and was presented by the GOP as a witness WITHOUT THEM NOTICING THAT SHE WAS NUTS.

When your political program is based on paranoia, fear, conspiracy theories and interpretations of the Book of Revelations, it is sometimes so hard to distinguish the boundaries of "sane" and "insane." Or what is legitimate "proof" or "facts" that justify your belief system (if your first move is rejecting the mainstream media or analytic data).

Come to think of it, the entire GOP has a problem with this right now.

Posted by: Bokonon on April 20, 2010 at 4:54 PM | PERMALINK

The Book of Revelation, one of the most hateful and pernicious documents in the histoyr of human civilization, has been inciting fear, paranoia, and oppression for two millenia. How many have been accused of being the anti-Christ since the one intended by the book's author, namely Nero? Every generation of paranoids labors under the delusion that this document, which clearly references the Roman empire of the first century, has to be about current times. The day this piece of trash was included in the New Testament canon was a horrible day for humanity.

Posted by: Virginia on April 20, 2010 at 4:55 PM | PERMALINK

I am a Democrat and a liberal, and further to the left than many liberals I know. But I am also a civil libertarian, and I have a problem with the idea of microchips. They are routinely put in pets these days, and there has been a mild push to put them in Alzeimer patients, who tend to wander. I also remember a program instituted when my son was only about 2 years old to get the kids fingerprinted in case they were kidnapped. I was prey to these fears and of course had my son fingerprinted. That was back in 1985. I certainly wouldn't do the same thing today. Privacy is a big deal to me. It's why I'm not on Face Page or My Space. It's also why i've never set up profiles on any websites I might comment on. It's why I don't have an On-Star system in my car.

Involuntary chip implantation is really not the threat right now, but the voluntary implementation of such technology for a variety of reasons...largely based on fear of one sort of another...is. And it is a fact that people are having chips implanted currently, though it is rare.

The woman who testified to the Georgia legislature does sound like she is probably ill. More troubling is the passage of the bill based around that type of testimony.

But I suspect that these folks who voted in favor of the bill would have absolutely no problem if the issue was "national security" as the excuse for doing so -- voluntarily or non.

Posted by: winddancer on April 20, 2010 at 4:55 PM | PERMALINK

@zeitgeist:

I sure didn't "volunteer" to have AT&T keep track of where I am 24/7 (and to co-locate me with other cell phone users) to snoop on my phone/email/text habits, and to data-mine my purchases. Merely purchasing a good or service should not permit the provider/seller to take your personal information for other commercial purposes (and any contract language saying that all users give up the rights to their personal information just because should be unenforceable).

Never mind about what the Government spies on.

You know, we used to have a Constitution and privacy laws that had something to say about this.

Posted by: 22state on April 20, 2010 at 4:56 PM | PERMALINK

Of course Federal law will supercede state law in this matter. We are coming to get you. (maniacal laughter)

Posted by: mikeyes on April 20, 2010 at 4:58 PM | PERMALINK

Makes more sense, now, why those Young RepuGs went to that Pole Dancing bar. It was to conduct research on implants.

Posted by: berttheclock on April 20, 2010 at 4:59 PM | PERMALINK

Winddancer, you're really onto something there. If there were a Republican in the White House and Liz Cheney said that we needed microchips in order for the government to Keep Us Safe (registered trade mark), these same people would line up to get them.

Posted by: T-Rex on April 20, 2010 at 5:01 PM | PERMALINK

This is just sad, because one of the most common delusions that schizophrenics develop is that the government is monitoring them, usually by implanting something in their bodies.

my mother, an otherwise educated sophisticated urbane Democratic life-long NYer is convinced that aliens planted one in her butt years ago. I tried reasoning with her that her life just isn't *that* interesting or important for aliens to really make that kind of effort. So it's not just a right wing thing.

I'm down with the schizophrenia explanation though.

Posted by: andy on April 20, 2010 at 5:02 PM | PERMALINK

That woman should be thankful for modern technology. In the fifties the DoD would have used vacuum tubes.

Posted by: Tim H on April 20, 2010 at 5:09 PM | PERMALINK

I sure didn't "volunteer" to have AT&T keep track of where I am 24/7 (and to co-locate me with other cell phone users)

Sure you did. No one requires you to use a cell phone. It isn't a necessity of life. And the Constitution's privacy protections apply to governments, not AT&T - and they never have applied to AT&T (except when AT&T is doing the government's bidding).

A little hint: cell phones simply wont work without knowing where you are all the time. Before GPS chip sets, they could get within about 300 yards through tower triangulation. So when you decide the convenience of a cell phone is something you want, you can't get by with the landline phone everyone used up until 10 years ago, yes you volunteered to let AT&T know your whereabouts at all times. It really is that simple.

I know it is hard to feel much sympathy for the big AT&T's of the world, but in the pre-GPS chip days, I represented a wireless carrier who was sued because when the user pushed 911 the carrier didn't know exactly where the user was and couldn't tell the government the user's whereabouts. Those suits cost a lot of money, and citizens argued for regulations that would require technology to monitor the users' exact location at all times. It was not some government conspiracy -- it was companies and regulators responding to other citizens who value safety versus privacy in different priorities than you do.

Posted by: zeitgeist on April 20, 2010 at 5:09 PM | PERMALINK
I sure didn't "volunteer" to have AT&T keep track of where I am 24/7 (and to co-locate me with other cell phone users) to snoop on my phone/email/text habits, and to data-mine my purchases. Merely purchasing a good or service should not permit the provider/seller to take your personal information for other commercial purposes (and any contract language saying that all users give up the rights to their personal information just because should be unenforceable).

While I agree it sucks that companies do that, you did, in fact, volunteer that info.

You did so the second you accepted their "Terms and Conditions." Read through them some time. It'll be in there.

All I can say about the microchip insanity is that P.T. Barnum was wrong.

There's one born every second.

Posted by: Mark D on April 20, 2010 at 5:10 PM | PERMALINK

The lady claims a microchip was involuntarily planted in her somewhere (rectum?) by the Dept of Defense. Do we know this to be a fact and what was/is the DOD program which forced this on her and what is its legality -- if it exists anywhere but in her mind?

Posted by: Regis on April 20, 2010 at 5:12 PM | PERMALINK

Let's see, if we assume that 20% of the U.S. population is made up of embattled heros trying to stave off the advances the evil devil-liberal government, that would mean that approximately 60,000,000 people would need to be 'chipped' if the glorious right-wing is to be 'monitored.'

And the legislature of Georgia is going to thwart this scheme? Really?

Posted by: -syzygy- on April 20, 2010 at 5:15 PM | PERMALINK

I sure feel better that my great State of Georgia had someone testify about her Ben Wa Balls.

Posted by: ComradeAnon on April 20, 2010 at 5:19 PM | PERMALINK

As a Georgia native, I'm glad the bigger world has a glimpse at what the Republican Chips--Republican Majority leader Chip Rogers, and bill sponsor Republican [micro]Chip Pearson do to our state and it's citizens. They don't do anything smart or gainful, are greed-driven, and racist.

These fear-mongering, anti-science, anti-education GOP hacks have really set the state back. Last year, Pearson re-defined 'ephemeral streams' to make environmental plunder easier for his buddies in the development business (who haven't bankrupted like Pearson's grading business did) even as we face an unsolved and growing water crisis, though we have the largest population on the smallest watershed in North America. And the Chips and GOP Gov Perdue have cut our low-ranked education system funding by record amounts, though Perdue bought an $18 million jet and made the Dubai Air show. Palin at least sold the new jet. Perdue and the GOP dropped our strong 2003 mortgage law, and now Georgia leads in bank failures. We're about to be the only state without an arts council. Mental patients are loose everywhere, as this lady's 'testimony' shows, and our only Level 1 trauma center is in default--but the GOP doesn't care because black people go there. Go Georgia GOP--your legacy will live long...in infamy.

Posted by: Native Georgian on April 20, 2010 at 5:27 PM | PERMALINK

Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated. We are the Borg-bama.

Posted by: GringoNoraca on April 20, 2010 at 5:30 PM | PERMALINK

Tim McVeigh infamously warned against forced micro-chip implantation as one of the reasons for his attack in Oklahoma City. A Dallas news magazine (The Dallas Observer) spoofed this the next year with a headline: "Micro-chip in Timothy MvVeigh's ass to be upgraded to Pentium". I laughed at the time (I was working with TI RFID micro-chips so I knew what the technology could and couldn't do) but it doesn't surprise me that the GOP is obsessed with this; they'd love to do it to the general population but exclude themselves.

Posted by: Steve Staton on April 20, 2010 at 6:00 PM | PERMALINK

Well I think it's the cell phones revving up Republican implants throughout America.

The implants make them aware of having implants and of being controlled because that keeps them freaked out and desperate for someone else to take charge.

Ingenious.

Posted by: cld on April 20, 2010 at 6:35 PM | PERMALINK

So it's not just a right wing thing.

Exactly. The people who are pissing me off here are the ones who are taking advantage of her mental illness to advance their own partisan agenda. I seriously doubt more than, say, 25% of the legislators who voted in favor of this bill actually believed her testimony.

Of course, it is Georgia, so we could be looking at 50% of them actually believing her.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on April 20, 2010 at 7:44 PM | PERMALINK

Er, "here" in my comment above refers to the story, not to any commenters here. Just to be clear.

Posted by: Mnemosyne on April 20, 2010 at 7:49 PM | PERMALINK

Hmmm... There's one thing that really worries me (other than the fact that a sick woman is being used as a prop for the GOP instead of getting help she needs).

The right wing tends to accuse others of things that they have already done, or would like to do... I wonder which category this falls into.

Posted by: David Langdon on April 20, 2010 at 9:06 PM | PERMALINK

They are cleverly trying to split the Democratic coalition by forcing us to defend Big Microchip.

Also, apropos of Dave Langdon's comment, not only is it a good point, it would provide their media enablers with a more comfortable explanation for what happened to Joe Lieberman and John McCain. Darth Cheney controlling their microchips is soooo much more credible than the truth; that they were always soulless dirtbags and the press is just now starting to notice, albeit only on the fifth cloudy Thursday of the month.

Posted by: bluewave on April 20, 2010 at 9:58 PM | PERMALINK

I sure didn't "volunteer" to have AT&T keep track of where I am 24/7 (and to co-locate me with other cell phone users)

You don't sem to have quite grasped how cell phones work.

Posted by: rea on April 21, 2010 at 6:52 AM | PERMALINK

Muldur lives!

The microchip fear dates back to the 70s and crazy evangelist preacher Hal Lindsey's The Late Great Planet Earth, as well as other apocalyptic types.

I don't think it was microchips at the time, but there was a definite fear that we were going to have to have social security numbers tattooed to our wrists as part of the Antichrist's grand scheme.

Posted by: lou on April 21, 2010 at 10:12 AM | PERMALINK

Where is your vision!? You guys are being short-sighted idiots to make fun of this one. This is not tin-hat fear of technology, this is a justified fear of where certain elitist individiuals' desire for control is leading us. It includes corporate employers and the military. It is backed by Verichip's desire to make a profit. It is a logical outcome of moving to an electronic society. It's a logical outcome of moving medical records to electronic form. It's a logical outcome of reacting to identity theft.

It's ironic that the GOP are the ones trying to alert people to this rapidly approaching invasion of our freedom to make decisions over our own bodies -- since wealthy GOP backers are the ones who are actively working toward implementing this technology.

Posted by: Steve on April 21, 2010 at 12:01 PM | PERMALINK

I know why they passed the law.

What if the DIDN'T???

"OMG!!! The Georgia Legislature is in cahoots with the DoD!!! Grab your rifles, boys!"


Now if a Georgia state law is going to stop DoD or Dick Cheney from planting microchips in my bunghole, hey, go for it, but she has more faith in our government's adherence to legal constraints than I do.

As a side note: just for the sake of accuracy, the DoD puts microchips at the base of your skull. It's ALIENS that put microchips in your rectum and genitals.

Don't ask me why. I don't make the rules.

Posted by: toowearyforoutrage on April 21, 2010 at 2:23 PM | PERMALINK

People who think all concern about microchipping is a delusional fantasy should read the papers. There -is-, in fact, a movement promoting the implanting of GPS locator microchips in children, similar to what is done with pets now, to track them if they are lost or kidnapped. For God's sake, it's been in the national news. In Sutter, California, children attending elementary school are required to wear a card with an ID microchip. This was a move by the school, without parental consent, and many parents denounced it. But fear of "predators" has caused many parents to push for it. It could be useful in some ways, for instance The Army wants to use it to help track lost or captured soldiers. I think you can ask hospitals to put in a microchip implant with your medical info on it, like those bracelets people wear now. Could save your life in an emergency, provided the hospital has a scanner to read it. If I volunteer to use one of these things and if it can be taken out later, that's fine, but I don't want it put in without my knowledge or to become a requirement for my kids to attend public school. And for the record I am a lifelong progressive and don't have a Republican bone in my body. It isn't government I distrust so much as big f$&%-you corporations that stand to make $$$ from things like this.

Posted by: Jack Young on May 1, 2010 at 7:51 PM | PERMALINK




 

 

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