Editore"s Note
Tilting at Windmills

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October 7, 2010

THE GOP'S 'HICKY' AD.... In West Virginia's U.S. Senate race, where polls show right-wing businessman John Raese with growing support, Democrats have tried to highlight the fact that the Republican nominee isn't what he might appear to be.

Raese, for example, claims to side with working people, but he opposes the minimum wage and mine-safety laws. He claims to be a West Virginian, but his home is in Florida.

The Democratic case was made slightly easier with evidence that a Republican ad in support of Raese is a sham, too.

A new Republican ad that shows a couple of guys at the counter of a diner, wearing ball caps and plaid shirts as they take shots at West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin (D), was shot with actors, from a script, in Philadelphia. [...]

"We are going for a 'Hicky' Blue Collar look," read the talent agency's casting call for the independent-expenditure ad, being aired by the National Republican Senatorial Committee. "These characters are from West Virginia so think coal miner/trucker looks."

"Clothing Suggestions" included jeans, work boots, flannel shirt, denim shirt, "Dickie's [sic] type jacket with t-shirt underneath," down-filled vest, "John Deer [sic] hats (not brand new, preferably beat up)," and "Trucker Hats (not brand new, preferably beat up)."

For Dems hoping to make the case that the GOP message, like its candidate, is a big deception, this certainly can't hurt. For that matter, one wonders how West Virginians will respond to being called "hicky" looking.

On a related note, Salon's Joan Walsh noted that John Kasich's (R) latest ad in Ohio's gubernatorial race features a "steelworker" trashing incumbent Gov. Ted Strickland (D). As it turns out, Kasich's campaign couldn't find a real Ohio steelworker, so the former Lehman Brothers executive hired an actor to pretend to be an Ohio steelworker.

"When we saw Congressman Kasich's ad, we wondered why any Ohio steelworker, whose job has been threatened by the unfair trade deals Kasich supported in Congress, would be willing to appear in his commercials," said USW Local 1238's John Saunders. "As it turns out, when Congressman Kasich couldn't get a real steelworker to do his dirty work, he did what any congressman from Wall Street would do -- he paid someone."

To be sure, hiring actors for campaign ads isn't exactly new or shocking. But under the circumstances, and the ways in which these revelations cut against the Republican message, it's the kind of story that might get some attention in the closing weeks of the campaign.

Steve Benen 8:00 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (24)

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Why wouldn't Republican candidates hire actors? Hell, the candidates are 'acting' like they care about the little people, not the corporate donors.

I would call them all 'thespians,' but that would just confuse the crap out of them, and get the relgious Christy people all stoked up, as well.

Posted by: c u n d gulag on October 7, 2010 at 8:09 AM | PERMALINK

If only the Dimocrats knew what to do with such rich material.

But they don't.

Posted by: rrk1 on October 7, 2010 at 8:13 AM | PERMALINK

The "trucker" caps should have been a dead giveaway. No one outside Brooklyn, NY, wears them, least of all truckers (who are likely to prefer the much nicer golf-style caps that the vendor or the tool rental place gives out).

Posted by: kth on October 7, 2010 at 8:14 AM | PERMALINK

Good Golly, Molly, you mean TeeVee ain't REAL? And here I been believin' since the boob tube was invented that you "couldn't say it, if it wasn't true"? After all, the print ads always say: "As seen on TV!"

-next thing they'll tell us that all them big titties ain't real. . .

Posted by: DAY on October 7, 2010 at 8:16 AM | PERMALINK

"For that matter, one wonders how West Virginians will respond to being called 'hicky' looking."

In *this* election cycle? It will be a badge of honor. Until a Democrat says it. Then, outraged.

Posted by: Perspecticus on October 7, 2010 at 8:21 AM | PERMALINK

No, DAY, television *is* real. The voices you are hearing from the little box in your living room with antennas sticking out of it is not from your imagination. Those are real voices, primarily from real people. What is fake is the notion that any Republican is actually working for your benefit.

Posted by: Perspecticus on October 7, 2010 at 8:25 AM | PERMALINK

Children behave
that's what they say when we're together

And watch how you play
they don't understand .

And so we're running hard right
just as fast as we can

Holding on to another wingnut spin .
Trying to get away into the night
until we can drop the compassionate conservative
charade
I think were in power now
it doesn't really matter what the dirty freakazoid truckers , hippie , miner's whine on about
I think were in power now
I am really glad we measured for the drapes

Look at the way
we gotta hide what we're doin'

'Cause what would they say if they ever knew ?

And so we're running just as fast as we can
Avoiding information that could lead us far astray

I know which side my bread is buttered on

Posted by: FRP on October 7, 2010 at 8:34 AM | PERMALINK

Thanks, Steve. I actually laughed out loud @ that one ;)

And I think Perspecticus is wrong. Hicks don't mind being called hicks just so long as it's not coming from the likes of some slick Floridian who pays actors to be West Virginia "hicky".

Posted by: Oh my on October 7, 2010 at 9:01 AM | PERMALINK

For what it's worth, this was the big story on the conservative news-talk radio station this morning here in East TN. The host and his supporting cast were outraged and offended.

Posted by: elmo on October 7, 2010 at 9:10 AM | PERMALINK

But under the circumstances, and the ways in which these revelations cut against the Republican message, it's the kind of story that might get some attention in the closing weeks of the campaign.

Fortunately, Democrats can count on the "liberal media" to get their message out...ah, who am I kidding. The fact that "these revelations cut against the Republican message" is exactly why the story won't get attention.

And even if it did, Republican voters have demonstrated time and again that they just don't care if their leaders are phonies, hypocrites or outright criminals -- indeed, electing people like that is seen as "pissing off liberals," and therefore a win.

Posted by: Gregory on October 7, 2010 at 9:12 AM | PERMALINK

I've seen that Kasich ad. Ye gods. The hard-hat guy is perfect, wounded war veteran eyes and a lower jaw just a-quiverin' at the sheer personal outrage he feels at Gov. Strickland in his fancy-pants suit ordering Ohio factories to fire workers just because he hates Ohio so much.

Posted by: beejeez on October 7, 2010 at 9:24 AM | PERMALINK

New ad:

Manchin- "I was born in West Virginia, spent my whole life here... I raised my family here. I love this state and care about its people, because to me, West Virginia is home. What does my opponent, John Raese, think of West Virginia? He's raising his family in Florida and in his latest attack ad against me he hired paid actors from Philadelphia to dress West Virginia "hicky". That's what Raese thinks of you.
I'm Joe Manchin and I approve this message."

There, dems, I wrote the frickin ad for you.

Posted by: Alrighty Then on October 7, 2010 at 9:25 AM | PERMALINK

What Alrighty Then said. The stuff just writes itself, if the Dems have the good sense to take advantage of it.

Posted by: low-tech cyclist on October 7, 2010 at 9:42 AM | PERMALINK

What's with the [sic] in the quote?

Dickey's is a brand of jeans popular with working people and John Deer caps are a staple of every rural area in the US.

The ad people knew EXACTLY what they were doing. It is the person who inserted the [sic] who is clueless.

http://www.dickies.com/product/product_listing.jsp;jsessionid=227hMtRHVVTVQJJTQL8HzFQwFvn1Ln8HCSLqTtd7LJ4Lxhk2GqhJ!-741193102?clearShopBys=true&FOLDER%3A%3Afolder_id=2534374302024402

http://www.deere.com/en_US/ProductCatalog/FR/category/FR_TRACTORS.html

Posted by: OKDem on October 7, 2010 at 9:59 AM | PERMALINK

Another second for Alrightly. And BTW, hasn't anyone thought to inquire of Raese whether he and bis wife file taxes jointly from his West Virginia address (I assume he has one). 'Cause if she filed with him as a resident of West Virginia, then she is commmitting fraud with the Florida homeowner exemption - and if she files separately, well, what's up with that? (Not that a lack of family values is a detriment for a Republican.)

Posted by: dcsusie on October 7, 2010 at 10:00 AM | PERMALINK

"What's with the [sic] in the quote?"

The indicated brand names were misspelled ... should be Dickies (no apostrophe) and John Deere.


Posted by: KTinOhio on October 7, 2010 at 10:09 AM | PERMALINK

I will not be too surprised when it is revelaed that the Angle/Vitter Race baiting ad features 3 "illegals" who are actually American citizens

Posted by: l4 on October 7, 2010 at 10:52 AM | PERMALINK

You get the "authenicity" you're willing to pay for, apparently.

For that matter, one wonders how West Virginians will respond to being called "hicky" looking.

I've long since quit being surprised by the amount of subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, contempt the red-state base is willing to put up with from GOP elites.

Posted by: Chet on October 7, 2010 at 12:46 PM | PERMALINK

kTinOhio - Opps. I get so used to adjusting the bad spelling on the web that I missed that Politico was clueless and not the editor.

Politico being clueless about blue collar anything...Duh!

Posted by: OKDem on October 7, 2010 at 1:20 PM | PERMALINK

The stuff just writes itself, if the Dems have the good sense to take advantage of it.

That's a mighty big if.

It would appear that a large portion of the Democratic establishment really believes -- in their heart of hearts -- that's it's only fair to give Republicans a shot at governance.

Posted by: Jasper on October 7, 2010 at 4:09 PM | PERMALINK

OKDem, the quote marks and the [sic] were both all in the Politico article, the misspellings and cluelessness were entirely on the part of the Philadelphia ad agency making this spot for the John Raese.

Posted by: tanstaafl on October 7, 2010 at 7:03 PM | PERMALINK

"What's with the [sic] in the quote?"
(sic) simply means Standard Industrial Code...inserted when written material includes Brand Names. It's not intended to bash the brand itself.

Posted by: Gina on October 8, 2010 at 11:11 AM | PERMALINK

Idiots.....it was one fool who used the term "hicky". Not the whole Republican Party.

Posted by: stan on October 10, 2010 at 3:14 PM | PERMALINK

@Gina - you're not serious.....are you? You do know what "sic" means really? If you are serious - where the hell did you get that idea from?

Posted by: Andy websdale on October 12, 2010 at 6:41 AM | PERMALINK




 

 

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