College Guide

Blog

February 29, 2012 4:13 PM Indiana Jones, Tenure Denied

By Daniel Luzer

NoTenureForYou

It’s actually rather easy to forget, but Indiana Jones was a professor, of archeology, at Marshall College (or sometimes Barnett College). Would he have received tenure? Well, probably not today.

Andy Bryan has a fun piece about this at McSweeney’s. The chairman of the Committee on Promotion and Tenure regrets to inform the archeologist that his “recent application for tenure has been denied by a vote of 6 to 1.”

The committee concurred that Dr. Jones does seem to possess a nearly superhuman breadth of linguistic knowledge and an uncanny familiarity with the history and material culture of the occult. However, his understanding and practice of archaeology gave the committee the greatest cause for alarm. Criticisms of Dr. Jones ranged from “possessing a perceptible methodological deficiency” to “practicing archaeology with a complete lack of, disregard for, and colossal ignorance of current methodology, theory, and ethics” to “unabashed grave-robbing.” Given such appraisals, perhaps it isn’t surprising to learn that several Central and South American countries recently assembled to enact legislation aimed at permanently prohibiting his entry.
Though Dr. Jones conducts “field research” far more often than anyone else in the department, he has consistently failed to report the results of his excavations, provide any credible evidence of attending the archaeological conferences he claims to attend, or produce a single published article in any peer-reviewed journal. Someone might tell Dr. Jones that in academia “publish or perish” is the rule. Shockingly, there is little evidence to date that Dr. Jones has successfully excavated even one object since he arrived at Marshall College. Marcus Brody, curator of our natural-history museum, assured me this was not so and graciously pointed out several pieces in the collection that he claimed were procured through Dr. Jones’s efforts, but, quite frankly, we have not one shred of documentation that can demonstrate the provenance or legal ownership of these objects.

“Moreover,” the chairman writes, “no one on the committee can identify who or what instilled Dr. Jones with the belief that an archaeologist’s tool kit should consist solely of a bullwhip and a revolver.”

Poor Jones. The letter is dated January 22, 1939, which would make him 40 years old, with a PhD and somewhat limited career prospects.

Whatever will he do? Well there’s maybe a dean of students position open at Marshall…. It probably pays really well. [Image via]

Daniel Luzer is the news editor at Governing Magazine and former web editor of the Washington Monthly. Find him on Twitter: @Daniel_Luzer

Comments

  • Steve P on March 01, 2012 10:06 AM:

    Not to mention the fact that some of his activities have placed our many long-standing ties with the German government in jeopardy, as well as our alumni associations in the upper Midwest.