Features

November/December 2012 The Conservative War on Prisons

Right-wing operatives have decided that prisons are a lot like schools: hugely expensive, inefficient, and in need of root-and-branch reform. Is this how progress will happen in a hyper-polarized world?

By David Dagan and Steven M. Teles

“Don’t Mess with Texas” bumper stickers have long found their most extreme confirmation in the state’s criminal justice system. Over the last two decades, Texas has been one of the most avid jailers in the nation. It was home to the largest prison-conditions lawsuit in American history, a thirty-year ordeal that infuriated conservatives and led them to plaster the state with posters calling for the impeachment of Judge William Wayne Justice. And of course, no prison cooks have taken as many last-meal orders as those in the Lone Star State—until officials recently did away with that perk for the condemned. But even as Texas continues to buff its toughest-on-crime reputation, it is also becoming, unexpectedly, a poster child for criminal justice reform.

A handful of liberal organizations have valiantly kept alive the argument for prison reform even through the dark days of the 1980s and ’90s. But most Democrats are still terrified of appearing timid before voters and can be persuaded to go along if the right gives them cover.

It started in 2005, when Tom Craddick, the first Republican speaker of the state legislature in more than a century, appointed Jerry Madden, a conservative from Plano, to run the House Committee on Corrections. As Madden recalls, the speaker’s charge to him was clear: “Don’t build new prisons. They cost too much.”

Madden was a corrections novice with a disarming, aw-shucks manner; his Senate counterpart, Democrat John Whitmire, was an old hand whose resume included being robbed at gunpoint in his garage. The greenhorn and the veteran soon agreed on what ailed the Texas criminal justice system: it was feeding on itself. Too many people flunked probation and went into prison. And too many prisoners committed new offenses shortly after being released, landing them back behind bars. To tackle the first problem, Madden and Whitmire suggested cutting loose veteran probationers who had proved reliable, thus allowing officers to focus their time on people at higher risk of screwing up. The legislature signed off, but Governor Rick Perry vetoed the bill.

At the start of the 2007 legislative session, legislative analysts predicted that Texas was on track to be short 17,700 prison beds by 2012 because of its growing inmate population. The Texas Department of Criminal Justice’s response was to ask legislators to build three new prisons, but Madden and Whitmire had other ideas. Not only did they bring back a revamped version of their probation proposal—they also took aim at the revolving-door problem by cranking up funding for programs such as in-prison addiction treatment and halfway houses. This time, Perry relented (persuaded at least in part, the duo contends, by a high-stakes meeting they held with him shortly before the opening of the legislative session). Since then, the prison population has not increased, and last year, the TDCJ closed a prison for the first time in decades.

Budget shortfalls do not explain this shift. In 2007 Texas was basking in a huge projected surplus, and the Great Recession was still a year away. Instead, Madden and Whitmire had different winds at their backs. For one thing, the policy context favored reform. One legacy of the state’s prison litigation trauma is that Texas has strict restrictions on overcrowding (unlike, say, California). Under Texas law, when the system approaches capacity, corrections staff must seek certification from the attorney general and the governor to incarcerate more prisoners. The approval process forces state leaders to confront the choice between more prisons and more diversion programming. The political environment had also changed since the GOP completed its takeover of state politics in 2003. As a longtime observer of the state’s criminal justice notes, “Now … all the tough guys are Republicans. They don’t want to be outdoing each other on this stuff.”

Texas was not the first state to experiment with common sense. Several others had begun tinkering with their criminal justice systems in the wake of the 2001 recession. When the fiscal belt tightened on a swelling inmate population in New York, for example, corrections officials prevailed upon then Governor George Pataki to take steps leading to earlier releases. But none of these initiatives reverberated like the Texas reforms.

The Texas turnaround created a golden opportunity to rebrand prison reform nationally. “People think if Texas does something, by definition it’s not going to be soft,” said Adam Gelb, director of a criminal justice initiative at the Pew Charitable Trusts. “There’s just this instant, deep credibility on the crime issue for Texas.” In 2005, the Texas Public Policy Foundation (TPPF)—the state’s premier conservative think tank—hired Marc Levin to become its first-ever crime wonk. The position was financed by Tim Dunn—a deeply conservative oilman, Republican donor, and Colson-inspired critic of the criminal justice system. Levin promptly threw himself into the Texas debates of 2005 and 2007, but his biggest contribution came later in building momentum for prison reform among conservatives across the country.

The TPPF is one of the most prominent members of the State Policy Network, which connects free-market think tanks in every state. Founded in 1992, the Arlington-based SPN zaps ideas—like Wisconsin-style restrictions on public employee pensions—from one member organization to another. Levin was and remains the only full-time crime analyst at any SPN member organization. As a result, he quickly became the go-to guy on the issue among state-level conservatives, fielding calls from curious colleagues, cowriting editorials and policy briefs, and making presentations at conservative conferences. Eventually, he decided to convert the effort into a formal campaign he called Right on Crime.

When Nolan heard about Right on Crime, he contacted Levin to offer his support—and his Rolodex. Nolan rounded up the members of his informal working group and other conservative luminaries to endorse a revised approach to crime control. Among the signatories: Keene, Viguerie, Gingrich, former Attorney General Ed Meese, and former drug czars Asa Hutchinson and Bill Bennett. Political scientist and long-time prison proponent John DiIulio is there, too, as is Grover Norquist. The Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins and other social conservatives also signed on. Right on Crime backers say explicitly that their goal was to lend their reputations to the effort and give conservatives political cover to launch reforms. “We wanted to create an atmosphere in which, amongst conservatives, there would be total legitimacy,” Nolan said.

David Dagan and Steven M. Teles collaborated on this article. Dagan is a doctoral student in political science at Johns Hopkins University and a freelance journalist. Teles is an associate professor of political science at Johns Hopkins.

Comments

  • Jack Lohman on November 13, 2012 7:37 AM:

    Hey, let's not mess with the private prison operators, like Correctional Institute of America. They are substantial campaign contributors, as are the prison guard unions. Our prison population of 10 times China's is fueled by minimum sentencing and three-strikes laws implemented by these very politicians.

  • P.S. Ruckman, Jr. on November 13, 2012 10:47 AM:

    I offer this post as additional reading re this topic: http://www.pardonpower.com/2010/12/conservative-case-for-pardon-power.html

  • paul on November 13, 2012 11:20 AM:

    This could be a good idea, or it could be a way to push Christianist indoctrination on an even larger percentage of prisoners and parolees. With another plus: gps-equipped ankle bracelets aren't unionized.

  • Ilene Flannery Wells on November 13, 2012 11:21 AM:

    People with serious mental illness make up approximately 5-7% of the US Adult population, yet make up over 20% of the prison population.

    The fact that the plight of the seriously mentally ill was not brought up in this article is very telling.

    Please read the Insanity Offense by Dr. E. Fuller Torrey. We have gone from "warehousing" the most seriously ill with mental illness in state hospitals to letting them rot and be raped in prison in even larger numbers than were so poorly treated in the state hospitals...one million are in lock up in local and county jails, and state and federal prisons, at any given moment. Over 200,000 are homeless.

    Not one mention about the days without end in solitary confinement for not "obeying" orders, while psychotic. Is that compassionate conservatism at work?

  • CanuckPhD on November 13, 2012 12:19 PM:

    Actually, CONservatives, the reason why the crime rate has dropped so much is because of Roe v. Wade. I know you folks are anti-intellectual, but TRY reading the following: http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/DonohueLevittTheImpactOfLegalized2001.pdf. I know if the CONS are moronic enough to actually ban abortion completely, I shall be investing heavily in private prison companies. America's pain, my gain.

  • Johnny Exchange on November 13, 2012 12:37 PM:

    On any given day there are 2.4 million inmates in American jails and prisons. The majority share one thing in common, a substance abuse problem. Nothing will change until we get to the root of how to deal with helping Americans with their addiction and abuse of drugs.

  • TonyT on November 13, 2012 12:39 PM:

    I'm all for reducing prisons. I don't believe the author's anecdotal link between crime rates and the rate of incarceration, there are other factors at play here in addition to some statistical kung-fu. The US is worse than China in locking people up. There are lots of people in prison that have no business being there. I see a prison as a place for verified dangerous people, nothing more.

  • Butch on November 13, 2012 12:56 PM:

    Johnny Exchange - first thing is to recognize that substance abuse/addiction is a medical/behavioral problem that incarceration doesn't do anything to solve. We don't treat alcohol and tobacco (the primary abused substances) that way.

    While people should get jail time and other punishments (fines, loss of drivers license) for endangering others (DUI), simple use should be legal, regulated, and taxed. Use all that tax revenue to boost treatment and palliative options.

  • Perry Jordan on November 13, 2012 1:05 PM:

    This headline is misleading. It's more like the Conservative War FOR Prisons. Private prisons, just like private education is where the money is at. The taxpayer money that is. This ingenious plan of offering more for less, getting you hooked, then raising the price tag has been done plenty of times. I believe it was where the term Pusher came from. It appears that since the public pool has dried up for new products, our "entrepreneurs" have their sites set on the tax dollars raked in. Didn't we test this private prison solution in Pennsylvania where a judge was sentenced to prison for sending kids to private juvenile homes for minor reasons while getting a kickback from the prison industry. Is that what we want? More private prisons, more laws, more people in jail, higher taxes to hold them all, more graft for judges? Naw, I don't think so.

  • jaja on November 13, 2012 3:30 PM:

    WTF. has anyone read THE NEW JIM CROW by Michelle Alexander? Maybe its a race thing. oh wait.... it IS!!!!

  • Tomm Katt on November 13, 2012 5:15 PM:

    This is an effort to privatize prisons. I can say for certain that from 2003 thru 2005 I worked for a security wholesaler that that targeted the hardware supply side because they KNEW that this was the goal.
    Each facility has a budget for millions of dollars to purchase door hardware, locks, and heavy duty (and VERY expensive) detention security devices.
    It must be constantly maintained to meet specifications set during the bid process by the product manufactures AND the wholesalers with access to those specific products. That assures that only the "chosen" suppliers meet the spec and the government must pay the lowest price that meets the requirement. There is ASTRONOMICAL COLLUSION INVOLVED IN THE ENTIRE PROCESS.
    All that is required on the political side is a steady supply of inmates so it is not in the best interest of profitability to offer assistance to those that are desperate enough to commit crimes.
    Since there are a lot more people that smoke weed and get caught than there are pedophiles, which inmates are more profitable?
    Ruining lives, price fixing, and laws that are used to subjugate minorities and the poor are the bread and butter of the GOP. It's an oppressors dream!!!!

  • Soulplumber on November 13, 2012 6:12 PM:

    Brewer wouldn't be Govenor of AZ without private prions backers, OH a new one on the way.
    The State of hate and fear

  • Jason Williams on November 13, 2012 7:50 PM:

    Let us not forget that the right is the biggest beneficiary of these so called "community oriented progs" that serve to "help" the formerly convicted. Also, let's not forget that the "reentry industry" is BIGGGGG MONEY!! This is not reform, it's simply the RELOCATION of justice into the hands of the "community" or more blatantly into the hands of the private sector under the so called guise of reformation when in fact it's the "deformation" of justice. I can hear them now, "Let's continue to profit off of the justice system, but let's do it in such a way where it is instead observed as a good". Ya ok! Hey welcome to the neo-liberal age folks! On a side note, when will criminologist begin to cover this, never??!

  • Marty on November 14, 2012 6:53 AM:

  • Karen Morison on November 14, 2012 9:39 PM:

    Jason Williams: you could nit be more wrong. I'm an expert on those community programs funded by the Feds. They're a creation of the Left, and the money goes to the same types of people who've always gotten social service funds. I guarantee that is correct. I followed those programs (including the authorizing statutes plus appropriations plus exactly who got the funds and what they did with them).

  • Phil on November 15, 2012 12:46 PM:

    This article is encouraging, but a number of the comments that follow it are not.
    The evolution in conservative thought on prison reform does represent real progress. Liberals should at least recognize this, and a not be opposed an idea merely because it comes from the mouth of a conservative.

    Regarding the privatization of prisons, let me take the opportunity to point out to liberal readers that this is a good example of an issue that divides establishment Republicans from libertarian conservatives. The libertarian wing doesn't want government money given to wasteful corporate contracts any more than it wants the government to waste money by direct spending. Opposition to corporate cronyism is a major libertarian theme.

    Libertarians also see the growth of government power manifested by an expansive prison system, the militarization of law enforcement, and ongoing futile drug war as a corrosive force which has eroded our most cherished values of liberty.

    In last week's election, both the GOP establishment and the social conservatives appear to have lost ground. Time will tell whether libertarian Republicans are able to take advantage of that. Meanwhile liberals would be wise to understand the differences between factions on the other side of the political spectrum and not put all conservatives in one basket.

  • jean on November 15, 2012 3:13 PM:

    Could it possibly be the PRIVATIZATION of the prison system that adds to the costs?


    Private Prisons: A Reliable American Growth Industry

    - Seeking Alpha
    seekingalpha.com/.../157536-private-prisons-a-reliable-american-gro...


    Cheney, Gonzales Indicted in Texas Prison Case

    | Fox News
    www.foxnews.com/.../cheney-gonzales-indicted-texas-prison-case/

    Haliberton and Blackwater/XE were such a bargain too right?

  • Southern Beale on November 15, 2012 8:19 PM:

    The view on prisons from my corner of the conservative hellhole (home of Corrections Corporation of America) is this: everything is better/cheaper/shinier/sparklier once it's been privatized.

    End of story.

  • Ed on November 17, 2012 4:55 AM:

    Prison rape was a natural issue to express conservatives' humanitarian impulses. Evangelicals who think homosexuality is immoral can easily be persuaded that homosexual rape under the eyes of the state is an official abomination.

    This probably wasn't the authors intention, but the quote seems to suggest that gay men are most often the perpetrators of male-on-male prison rape. My understanding is that the perpetrators are usually straight or straight-identified.

  • kitten on November 17, 2012 11:34 AM:

    I'll believe there is any serious movement on criminal justice reform when something is done to end the egregious practices of employers asking about past convictions on job applications, and the proliferation of background checks. Asking about past convictions at any time during the hiring process should be banned outright, and background checks should only be required for a small percentage of jobs and then only limited to a certain period of time - say 7 years for felonies and 1 year for misdemeanors - and limited to offenses which directly relate to the job in question. Those websites proliferating of late which let you run background checks on all your neighbors without even getting their express written permission first should also be banned.

    Anyone who is serious about cutting the incarceration rate would start here. As long as a past conviction makes it difficult to find meaningful work, it creates a situation where these people are left with no other option than to return to crime.

    "Reentry" programs aren't good enough. They are little more than excuses for employers to continue to ask "the question", while funnelling ex-convicts into menial low-wage jobs.

  • Jane on November 19, 2012 11:13 AM:

    My son was convicted for an internet crime. He was caught with 'some' child porn on his computer along with a lot of other porn. I was compelled to see the evidence for myself and asked friends from Belgium to look at the exact files they say they found in evidence, and describe them to me, and they were family members inducing youngish (12, 14, 16 years old) to be sexual. It's wrong, totally wrong, but my son had nothing to do with the original crime. He was sentenced to 3 years for two videos they found on his computer. I'm very angry that he is doing time for this. We couldn't afford an attorney so we had no choice but to accept the work of a public defender. In the end it might not have made any difference. The judge said the images they found on his computer would be used against him similarly as if it were a murder scene. Only my son didn't murder anyone, and he didn't even make those images. They said in court that he would be charged for each individual video as if he were the perpetrator in the video, so he was "lucky" to get only 4 years.

    Prison should be a last resort to a non-violent offense. And we have a moral obligation to help these people we incarcerate to learn different skills and behaviors. My son has been in there a year now and I get all the stories first-hand. It's a horrible situation we've created. What's even sadder is that a lot of these people have no clue what to do with their lives when released. We've done NOTHING to help them.

    It's unconscionable in my eyes. I would have never known about this whole setup if this had not happened to us.

  • Jane on November 19, 2012 11:55 AM:

    About the article. I don't believe the conservatives move toward justice or fairness, generally. I'm not sure liberals have the right answers so yeah maybe there needs to be a middle ground, but I don't know. I do know that the current system is a waste. And privatization should not be happening. I really believe, as a society, we have a moral obligation to incorporate programs, educate, teach skills and ways to think differently, because most prisoners end up back into society, right? If we're going to go to the extreme of incarcerating people, we owe this to them and to ourselves, as a society, to rehabilitate people or at least give it our best shot. Rehabilitation should be the first line defense, but absolutely if we imprison people. Maybe I'm being naive or idealistic. Warehousing people is stupid and damaging. And pointless.

  • Bill on November 20, 2012 2:19 AM:

    This article completely misses the fact that the American Legislative Exchange Council stopped lobbying for prison privatization as soon as it no longer had any private prison corporations paying membership fees. That corporate bill mill has only one motivation behind its policies: money.

  • Anonymous on November 22, 2012 4:25 PM:

    I resent the racial material in the article. Except for drug laws (see below) the system is not biased against minorities: they simply offend more often, and they can stop anytime they want. It would help if they stopped listening to the likes of Al Sharpton, who tells them Whitey owes them a free living. That debt was paid in 1964 and it's racist to say it still exists.

    @Johnny Exchange: You're right about one thing -- most US prisoners are in for drugs, a victimless crime that would not be on the books in any civilized country (and all crime and suffering attributed to drugs is caused by the laws against them). Free those people and more than half the problem goes away.

  • Duggan Flanakin on May 10, 2013 10:41 AM:

    The simple fact is that the nation's biggest criminals -- bankers, politicians, and such -- escape not only incarceration but also prosecution. Even worse, they are rewarded for their crimes with huge golden parachutes and bonuses. They laugh at the rest of us as they mock justice and impose burdens on the rest of America. Until Chris Dodd, Barney Frank and Franklin Raines are in prison, I believe that we owe an apology to every person in America behind bars -- and indeed, if our President and Secretary of State can flat out lie about BenGhazi (and so much more) then we should dismantle all of our security apparatus -- especially the Transportation Safety Agency and the Internal Revenue Service -- that has any power over the lives of American citizens.