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February 17, 2012 10:53 AM Foster Friess Doubles Down

By Ed Kilgore

So on his “Campfire Blog,” which is apparently how he communicates with the world when he’s not on our television screens, Santorum Super-PAC heavy and all-purpose spokesman Foster Friess apologized to the poor dumb humorless people who didn’t get his “joke” about “gals” back in his day using “Bayer aspirin between their knees” as a birth control method. He duly begs our forgiveness for his not anticipating our humorlessness.

But instead of just shutting up on the subject, and maybe letting his money do all the talking like the Supreme Court has encouraged him to do, Friess went on to say the controversy over his “joke” gave him a fresh opportunity to remind everyone what a cool dude Rick Santorum is on the subject of contraception:

He publicly stated he would not ban contraception; he has said if he were a member of a state legislature which introduced such a bill, he would vote against it.

That’s mighty nice of Rick, but not exactly a big act of courage, and not really honest, either, since he’s supported a “Personhood Amendment” under which any number of devices and presciption drugs that most Americans understand to be “contraceptives” (intra-uterine devices, the Plan B “morning-after” pill, and perhaps even “The Pill,” the basic oral contraceptive used by tens of millions of women) are in fact homicidal “abortifacients” that should be banned in all circumstances.

Friess doesn’t acknowledge any of that, but he does acknowledge Rick’s outspoken personal opposition to contraception by any definition and tries to turn his candidate’s kind (if extremely limited) tolerance of the heathen on this subject into an invidious contrast with the president:

[H]e has never attempted to turn his personal preference into public policy unlike the stand President Obama has taken in forcing Catholic institutions to embrace his world view.

If this is Foster Friess’ idea of an act of contrition, I’d sure hate to see how he’d behave if he became the Power Behind the Throne at the White House.

Ed Kilgore is a contributing writer to the Washington Monthly. He is managing editor for The Democratic Strategist and a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. Find him on Twitter: @ed_kilgore.

Comments

  • MattF on February 17, 2012 11:04 AM:

    Q: Is it a surprise that Santorum's patron is an elderly white misogynist?
    A: No.

  • RepublicanPointOfView on February 17, 2012 11:06 AM:

    This once again shows that you liberals do not have a sense of humor; while us good old boys do! All our good social conservatives want is to overturn Griswold vs Connecticut and go back to the good old days.

    Your politicial correctness is destroying our country and we sure do miss the good old days when we could call a spade a spade and a kike a kike and a brown a spic.

  • martin on February 17, 2012 11:10 AM:

    I anxiously await Friess making a few jokes about using Coca Cola as birth control:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NOULyMvcXk

  • boatboy_srq on February 17, 2012 11:11 AM:

    The problem with this whole debate is that when Progressives talk about "contraception," they mean condoms, IUDs and The Pill; when Conservatists use that word what they really mean is "abstinence," and anything else seems to fall under "abortion."

    Interesting that Friess would use a state-specific illustration - when his candidate is running for federal office.

    Captcha: 'villsolv surgeon,". Is Captcha anti-choice?

  • zandru on February 17, 2012 11:16 AM:

    It's just amazing, truly incredible the way the GOP is deliberately throwing away over 50% of the vote.

    You go, guys!! (heh, heh, heh)

  • Anonymous on February 17, 2012 11:21 AM:

    back in his day using “Bayer aspirin between their knees” as a birth control method

    And his pappy used an even more ingenious method of nightly stitching women folk in gunny sacks....

    [H]e has never attempted to turn his personal preference into public policy.....

    Bullshit. Santorum personally believes rich people pay toooo much taxes. Since I belong to the Church of Sanity and American Tradition, Santorum's world view would be shoved so far down my throat, I'd likely need some santorum to lube up a surgical extraction.

  • T-rollop on February 17, 2012 11:21 AM:

    I'm sorry but isn't Foster's Freeze a low budget Dairy Queen?

    This guy should have been one very messy abortion.

  • steve on February 17, 2012 11:27 AM:

    Watching Repub's self-destruct is fun. However, the issue we must stay focused on is economic equality\fairness. The .01% would love for us to get distracted by contraception arguments. Don't fall for it.

  • Mimikatz on February 17, 2012 11:30 AM:

    I'm just old enough to remember that old saw about the aspirin, having been in college in the early '60s. What Foster Freeze doesn't realize is that the reason that irritates women so much is that it reinforces the old idea that women are responsible for controlling men's sexuality. Men had natural desires, but the woman had to keep her legs closed to prevent pregnancy, rather than the man keeping his pecker under control. If there was a failure and they "went too far" it was the woman's fault and she paid by being known as slut when he boasted or worse, with pregnancy.

    The pill and then other means for women ended all that, so much so that younger women seemed not even to understand the joke at first (although Andrea Mitchell is a decade or more older than I) . But still. The Eve stereotype is alive and well even in younger men, like Santorum. And we are all Mary Magdalene in the Bishops' eyes.

  • T2 on February 17, 2012 11:30 AM:

    if Santorum becomes president, Foster Friess will be the least of our problems. One thing he did say on Andrea's show yesterday, overshadowed by his "aspirin" comment was that next year after Santorum is elected and the House and Senate are all Republican once again, we will return our country to its rightful place as the "Shining LIght on the Hill." In addition to misogynist, I think we might add racist to his resume. No surprise for a GOPer.

  • AndThenThere'sThat on February 17, 2012 11:55 AM:

    [H]e has never attempted to turn his personal preference into public policy unlike the stand President Obama has taken in forcing Catholic institutions to embrace his world view.

    OMG. That's a breathtaking statement made in defense of a former Senator who did everything he could to bring the weight of the entire federal government down on one family's decision.

  • Sgt. Gym Bunny on February 17, 2012 11:58 AM:

    @ Mimikatz

    Hear, hear!!!

    When these conversations about contraceptives and abortion come up, male culpability is never discussed in bringing about these unfortunate circumstances. No mention of shotgun weddings or anything (not that they're desirable). From the way these 'Publican potheads rage against women's reproductive business, you'd think that these men-folk were innocent bystanders to an orgy of lesbian women and sperm-producing battery-operated boyfriends.

  • Ron Byers on February 17, 2012 12:13 PM:

    One of the effects of Citizens United is we are going to be exposed to more billionaires than we have in the past. George Soros, Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and the rest of the regular billionaire players on the national stage are media savey. Most of the guys on the Republican side are like Friess, Adelman and the Koch Brothers, utterly clueless dinosaurs. Notice I didn't mention Donald Trump. Anybody who has gone bankrupt as much as "Teh Donald" and needs a reality show to stay afloat isn't a real billionaire.

    Guys like Friess would do well to let Rove spend their money, but the just don't have such self restraint in them. A lot of them are going to go off the reservation in very public ways.

  • exlibra on February 17, 2012 12:22 PM:

    And his pappy used an even more ingenious method of nightly stitching women folk in gunny sacks.... -- Anonymous, @11:21

    That's because his pappy was reduced to poverty by excessive taxation. His great-great-great... grand pappy used something much more reliable than that:
    http://www.calonsong.org/CalontirSongs/chastitybelt.htm

    But chastity belt, gunny sack and condom (the contraceptive that many -- though not Santorum -- think is the perfect alternative to all other, morally dubious, contraceptives) all have one thing in common -- the decision to use them is not the woman's; the control remains in man's hands.

  • Conrad Baylor on February 17, 2012 12:26 PM:

    The humorless left. One just has to feel sorry for them.

  • LAC on February 17, 2012 12:34 PM:

    "[H]e has never attempted to turn his personal preference into public policy unlike the stand President Obama has taken in forcing Catholic institutions to embrace his world view."

    Now, that is funny joke, Foster. Open with that one next time at the Dean Martin celebrity roast.

    Did someone order the old fashioned?

  • TooManyJens on February 17, 2012 12:53 PM:

    "he’s supported a “Personhood Amendment” under which any number of devices and presciption drugs that most Americans understand to be “contraceptives” (intra-uterine devices, the Plan B “morning-after” pill, and perhaps even “The Pill,” the basic oral contraceptive used by tens of millions of women) are in fact homicidal “abortifacients” that should be banned in all circumstances. "

    Actually, no, because those forms of contraception actually work prior to fertilization: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/17/health/religious-groups-equate-some-contraceptives-with-abortion.html?_r=1

  • boatboy_srq on February 17, 2012 1:39 PM:

    @TooManyJens:

    Actually, um, no, Ed's right here. The IUD and Plan B are explicitly included in the "religious" opposition, because they work prior to implantation, not fertilization. Preventing fertilization (what the religionists call "conception") seems OK - but much of what modern society considers preventing "conception" actually falls on the wrong side of their criteria.

    FYI this IS all in the Times article.

  • MelanieN on February 17, 2012 2:02 PM:

    Something nobody has mentioned yet, about this old "aspirin" joke (and yes, it is an old joke; Friess didn't invent it): The implication of the joke is, if you don't want to get pregnant, don't have sex. Fine. What do these jolly jokesters have to say to married women, who want the right to plan their families while still engaging in the holy matrimony these righties are all in favor of? Remember that Santorum is a Catholic, and the Catholic hierarchy doesn't approve of contraception by ANYBODY; married couples are supposed to use the rhythm method, aka Vatican Roulette. These jokesters don't want to ban just unmarried sex; they want EVERYBODY to have to conform to Vatican guidelines.

  • TCinLA on February 17, 2012 2:38 PM:

    I don't know if anyone here remembers a relatively obscure (i.e., non-commercial) movie John Carpenter made back in the late 1980s, but the concept was that if one had these special glasses, and looked at right wingers, one could see that they were reptilian space aliens come to invade us - I've always thought that was pretty close to the truth.

    It never ceases to amaze me how these guys are always so surprised when their idea of "humor" turns out to be pretty humorless.

    But let's thank them for ripping off their disguises and parading their reptilian splendor for all to see, because it's doing nothing but good for our side.

    And it's always nice for a moron like this guy to once again demonstrate that there is no connection between the brain and the billfold. How did he get his money anyway? Inherit it? He's certainly incapable of having made it on his own.

  • DianaW on February 17, 2012 2:51 PM:

    Fleiss doesn't get a break and he didn't make a "joke."
    Oral contraception in particular and contraception in general have been around for over 60 years. Unless he's over 85, or he's sexually clueless, he knows this. There's no folksy "back in my day" here. The mainstream media shouldn't be treating this as a joke. It's a flat out misrepresentation of how important birth control is to women and families. He should be called on this

  • zandru on February 17, 2012 3:12 PM:

    So Mr. Tastee Friesse believes that women are the only ones responsible for causing sex to break out, and the wizened council of Catholic biships believe that, like themselves, men should just not have sex.

    Proving, once again, that reality has a strong liberal bias!

  • Anonymous on February 17, 2012 3:34 PM:

    I don't know if anyone here remembers a relatively obscure (i.e., non-commercial) movie John Carpenter made back in the late 1980s, but the concept was that if one had these special glasses, and looked at right wingers, one could see that they were reptilian space aliens come to invade us

    TCinLA: Yes, "They Live", one of the best scifi flicks ever, and the inspiration for at least one South Park scene.

  • G.Kerby on February 17, 2012 3:35 PM:

    Err, that was my post:

    TCinLA: Yes, "They Live", one of the best scifi flicks ever, and the inspiration for at least one South Park scene.

  • zandru on February 17, 2012 3:40 PM:

    They Live

    Two people beat me to it! (Well, I had to take a phone call and generate a document...) Now I have to see it...

    "netdoc shalt". Well, it makes a nice change from all the "shalt nots" we've been getting lately from our Republican brethren. (No word from their sistren, though...)

  • TCinLA on February 17, 2012 4:15 PM:

    I finally figured this guy out: he's from wyoming, the dumbest place in the West (yeah, I know, you have the competition of Idaho and Utah, but Wyoming actually manages to squeak past both for this honor). You can actually feel the IQ drop when you drive across the state border.

  • Cal Gal on February 17, 2012 5:00 PM:

    "{H]e has never attempted to turn his personal preference into public policy ..."

    Oh, no? He has never voted to limit a woman's access to abortion?


    Really?

  • Texas Aggie on February 17, 2012 11:53 PM:

    May I nominate Richard Santorum for the Humorlessness Award of the Decade? Have you ever heard him react to Dan Savage's joke about what "Santorum" means? Did his reaction sound to you like someone who enjoys a good joke?