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August 17, 2012 8:12 AM Daylight Video

By Ed Kilgore

As a tribute to Dave Weigel’s fine series on Progressive Rock that’s running at Slate this week, here’s Yes performing “Yours Is No Disgrace” in 1972. I don’t care if this band’s excesses did kill Prog: they got me emotionally through college.

Ed Kilgore is a contributing writer to the Washington Monthly. He is managing editor for The Democratic Strategist and a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. Find him on Twitter: @ed_kilgore.

Comments

  • daveminnj on August 17, 2012 9:03 AM:

    bring on the six wives of henry the eigth!

  • berttheclock on August 17, 2012 9:21 AM:

    G'day, Ed

    How about a shout out to Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine, for the band's Op-Ed lashing out against Paul Ryan. Ryan has said they are his favorite band. Morello, the Harvard grad really rips him.

  • berttheclock on August 17, 2012 9:23 AM:

    G'day, Ed

    How about a shout out to Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine, for the band's Op-Ed lashing out against Paul Ryan. Ryan has said they are his favorite band. Morello, the Harvard grad, really rips him.

  • Jack G on August 17, 2012 10:29 AM:

    Weigel started with the premise that prog rock "died" at some point in the '70s. Not true.
    Prog began as "underground" music, and the interests of the musicians/listeners involved in it were in finding alternatives to the shallow "pop" music pervading the airwaves and record stores.
    When bands like Yes and ELO "went pop", they flamed out after a few years (as all pop sensations seem to do), but prog did not die; it went underground again.
    If you want to see where prog has been for the last 30 years or so, try the internet radio station, auralmoon.com. Look at their library (I think you have to register on the site to see it). There are hundreds of prog bands listed, most of it very good and interesting music. Prog encompasses many different sounds (from Andreas Vollenweider to Godspeed You! Black Emperor, from Jeff Beck to Mogwai), but the one thing it has in common is that you won't hear it on Top 40 stations.

  • Jack G on August 17, 2012 10:32 AM:

    Weigel started with the premise that prog rock "died" at some point in the '70s. Not true.
    Prog began as "underground" music, and the interests of the musicians/listeners involved in it were in finding alternatives to the shallow "pop" music pervading the airwaves and record stores.
    When bands like Yes and ELO "went pop", they flamed out after a few years (as all pop sensations seem to do), but prog did not die; it went underground again.
    If you want to see where prog has been for the last 30 years or so, try the internet radio station, auralmoon.com. Look at their library (I think you have to register on the site to see it). There are hundreds of prog bands listed, most of it very good and interesting music. Prog encompasses many different sounds (from Andreas Vollenweider to Godspeed You! Black Emperor, from Jeff Beck to Mogwai), but the one thing it has in common is that you won't hear it on Top 40 stations.

  • mike reilly on August 17, 2012 11:52 AM:

    Great video!!! I loved this group. Along with early Pink Floyd, early Fleetwood Mac, early Peter Frampton.... get the drift... you can probably say the same thing about movie stars...as in, early Harrison Ford, early Tom Cruise, and of course, early Kevin Costner.

    But Yes was definitely in my top ten bands in college, and live they were great. How about this concert in Akron Rubber Bowl. Warm up band, The Eagles, followed by John McLaughlin & Mahavishnu Band, and then Yes. Not bad. Great memories...thanks. (trying playing it on vinyl, really great sound.

  • Crystal on August 17, 2012 12:14 PM:

    like James said I am inspired that a stay at home mom can make $4943 in four weeks on the internet. did you see this page (Click on menu Home more information) http://goo.gl/P5e1Z

  • shelli n on August 17, 2012 1:09 PM:

    ed -- thanks much for the video -- yes was also one of my favorites during high school (i started college in '76). as for what happened to prog rock, it is a lot of what jack g. posted -- but huge cultural and commerical forces in this country in the last 30 years contributed mightily to the backbenching of it. i remember listening to FM radio when it was new -- and discovering treasures like the paul butterfield blues band, hot tuna, and other great bands that weren't in the top 40 on AM radio. it was the beginning of my musical evolution and a lifelong love affair with the blues. but as with anything in this country, commercialization and consolidation seem as inevitable as being assimilated by the borg. the bands that didn't assimilate found their music delted from radio stations' playlists - and back then, this was really the only way to get one's music public.

    we are a poorer nation for this.

  • moodmovesmarkets on August 17, 2012 1:53 PM:

    I agree with Jack. My 20-year old nephew turned me on to The Mars Volta. Prog enough for me.

  • reidmc on August 17, 2012 2:30 PM:

    Thanks for not posting something by the Nice.

  • pjcamp on August 18, 2012 1:34 AM:

    " they got me emotionally through college. "

    Really? Because I never could figure out what the F they were talking about. Witness:

    Sing, bird of prey;
    Beauty begins at the foot of you. Do you believe the manner?
    Gold stainless nail,
    Torn through the distance of man
    As they regard the summit.

    Even Siberia goes through the motions.
    Hold out and hold up;
    Hold down the window. Outbound, river,
    Hold out the morning that comes into view. Bluetail, tailfly.
    River running right on over my head.

    Um, yeah. I guess he wouldn't lie about a think like that.