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July 30, 2013 1:34 PM Lunch Buffet

By Ed Kilgore

It’s going to be difficult to avoid the temptation to keep reposting The Fugs’ “Nothing” in the coming months on those occasions when I look at the news aggregators and find—nothing. Thank God for the Virginia governor’s race, which should be wild and wooly.

Here are some mid-day items hot off the stove:

* Military judge finds Bradley Manning not guilty on capital charge of “aiding the enemy,” but guilty on 19 lesser charges of violating the Espionage Act.

* Boehner and McConnell reject Obama “bargain” on corporate taxes practically before he even formally proposes it.

* Folks are beginning to look back at the big Times Magazine and People puff pieces on Anthony Weiner’s “rehabilitation” last year and wonder why the authors didn’t ask a few more questions.

* Hill Rats beginning to freak at possible premium costs of switch from FEHBP coverage to Obamacare exchanges, insisted on by Republicans during consideration of ACA.

* New PPP survey shows you-know-who leading Republican U.S. Senate field if she runs, but losing to Mark Begich by double-digits.

And in non-political news:

* Georgia woman baffled by 7-foot KFC bucket in front yard, a 40-year-old relic placed by landlord without notice. KFC gives her fried chicken picnic. Everybody’s happy.

What makes me happy is that I found a very different relic, a 1972 song by The Fugs’ Ed Sanders, that’s been rattling around my memory for decades. Entitled “The Shredding Machine,” it’s about one of the less-remembered Watergate scandals involving illegal campaign contributions to the Nixon campaign by ITT, allegedly brokered by a lobbyist named Dita Beard. Enjoy, serious political junkies; it’s very catchy:

Back in a while.

Ed Kilgore is a contributing writer to the Washington Monthly. He is managing editor for The Democratic Strategist and a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. Find him on Twitter: @ed_kilgore.

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