Ten Miles Square

Blog

May 27, 2012 9:14 AM Candidates and Position-Taking

By Jonathan Bernstein

I’m a little behind on my “elsewhere” posts, but in lieu of one of those I’ll mention that I’ve started looking at Republican Senate candidate web sites now, and wrote a couple of posts yesterday — I found that Paul Ryan only rated a mention by a single candidate (out of 16 I looked at) and that marriage showed up for about half of them. Oh, just in case you’re wondering — not a single one of the candidates I looked at said anything about the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. Not exactly a surprise, but we shouldn’t forget how successful the roll-out of that one has been. I mean, we’re talking about quite a few very conservative candidates, many of whom are running in competitive Republican primaries, and none of them think they can get any traction with gays in the military — and half don’t want to speak publicly about any sexual orientation issue at all. The old language about “special” rights is fading fast, as is perhaps the whole conservative rhetoric of sexual orientation.

Anyway, the real reason for this post is to get some suggestions. I’m set up to go back through the Republicans, or I could look at the Democrats again — are there any issues that would be of interest? I’ve looked at marriage, public option, torture/civil liberties, and Senate reform for Democrats, plus the two above ones for Republicans. I think I asked about this before, but I find this stuff interesting (and the underlying question of what policy promises the parties are making is an important one, even though it’s not clear how useful the web pages are for that). So, what would you like to know about what Senate candidates are saying?

[Cross-posted at A plain blog about politics]

Jonathan Bernstein is a political scientist who writes about American politics, especially the presidency, Congress, parties, and elections.
tags

Comments

  • Bart Preecs on May 28, 2012 12:40 PM:

    I would be curious how many Democrats mention "inequality" or "fairness" in their websites.

    The framing and naming of the Occupy argument about 99 % and 1% is still a work in progress for Democratic officeholders I suspect, but with Dodd-Frank and financial regulation bubbling up again, the issue might continue to grow in importance.