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May 17, 2013 9:00 AM How Persuadable Are Voters?

By John Sides

Political candidates often believe they must focus their campaign efforts on a small number of swing voters open for ideological change. Based on the wisdom of opinion polls, this might seem like a good idea. But do most voters really hold their political attitudes so firmly that they are unreceptive to persuasion? We tested this premise during the most recent general election in Sweden, in which a left- and a right-wing coalition were locked in a close race. We asked our participants to state their voter intention, and presented them with a political survey of wedge issues between the two coalitions. Using a sleight-of-hand we then altered their replies to place them in the opposite political camp, and invited them to reason about their attitudes on the manipulated issues. Finally, we summarized their survey score, and asked for their voter intention again. The results showed that no more than 22% of the manipulated replies were detected, and that a full 92% of the participants accepted and endorsed our altered political survey score. Furthermore, the final voter intention question indicated that as many as 48% (±9.2%) were willing to consider a left-right coalition shift. This can be contrasted with the established polls tracking the Swedish election, which registered maximally 10% voters open for a swing. Our results indicate that political attitudes and partisan divisions can be far more flexible than what is assumed by the polls, and that people can reason about the factual issues of the campaign with considerable openness to change.

From this piece by Lars Hall and colleagues.  It is connected to their broader research agenda on choice blindness.  It’s a pretty striking result, though one wonders whether there is any real-world analogue to the experimental manipulation they carried out.  And I’d like to see what kinds of conditions might affect subjects’ ability to detect the manipulation.  Regardless, I thought this was interesting.

[Cross-posted at The Monkey Cage]

John Sides is an associate professor of political science at George Washington University.